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    restify-clientspublic

    restify-clients

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    HttpClient, StringClient, and JsonClient extracted from restify

    This module contains HTTP clients extracted from restify.

    • JsonClient - sends and expects application/json
    • StringClient - sends url-encoded request and expects text/plain
    • HttpClient - thin wrapper over node's http/https libraries

    The idea being that if you want to support "typical" control-plane REST APIs, you probably want the JsonClient, or if you're using some other serialization (like XML) you'd write your own client that extends the StringClient. If you need streaming support, you'll need to do some work on top of the HttpClient, as StringClient and friends buffer requests/responses.

    All clients support retry with exponential backoff for getting a TCP connection; they do not perform retries on 5xx error codes like previous versions of the restify client. You can set retry to false to disable this logic altogether. Also, all clients support a connectTimeout field, which is use on each retry. The default is not to set a connectTimeout, so you end up with the node.js socket defaults.

    Getting Started

    Install the module with: npm install restify-clients

    Usage

    Client API

    There are actually three separate clients shipped in restify:

    • JsonClient: sends and expects application/json
    • StringClient: sends url-encoded request and expects text/plain
    • HttpClient: thin wrapper over node's http/https libraries

    The idea being that if you want to support "typical" control-plane REST APIs, you probably want the JsonClient, or if you're using some other serialization (like XML) you'd write your own client that extends the StringClient. If you need streaming support, you'll need to do some work on top of the HttpClient, as StringClient and friends buffer requests/responses.

    All clients support retry with exponential backoff for getting a TCP connection; they do not perform retries on 5xx error codes like previous versions of the restify client. You can set retry to false to disable this logic altogether. Also, all clients support a connectTimeout field, which is use on each retry. The default is not to set a connectTimeout, so you end up with the node.js socket defaults.

    Here's an example of hitting the Joyent CloudAPI:

    var clients = require('restify-clients');
     
    // Creates a JSON client
    var client = clients.createJsonClient({
      url: 'https://us-east-1.api.joyent.com'
    });
     
     
    client.basicAuth('$login', '$password');
    client.get('/my/machines', function(err, req, res, obj) {
      assert.ifError(err);
     
      console.log(JSON.stringify(obj, null, 2));
    });

    As a short-hand, a client can be initialized with a string-URL rather than an options object:

    var clients = require('restify-clients');
     
    var client = clients.createJsonClient('https://us-east-1.api.joyent.com');

    Note that all further documentation refers to the "short-hand" form of methods like get/put/del which take a string path. You can also pass in an object to any of those methods with extra params (notably headers):

    var options = {
      path: '/foo/bar',
      headers: {
        'x-foo': 'bar'
      },
      retry: {
        'retries': 0
      },
      agent: false
    };
     
    client.get(options, function(err, req, res) { .. });

    If you need to interpose additional headers in the request before it is sent on to the server, you can provide a synchronous callback function as the signRequest option when creating a client. This is particularly useful with node-http-signature, which needs to attach a cryptographic signature of selected outgoing headers. If provided, this callback will be invoked with a single parameter: the outgoing http.ClientRequest object.

    JsonClient

    The JSON Client is the highest-level client bundled with restify; it exports a set of methods that map directly to HTTP verbs. All callbacks look like function(err, req, res, [obj]), where obj is optional, depending on if content was returned. HTTP status codes are not interpreted, so if the server returned 4xx or something with a JSON payload, obj will be the JSON payload. err however will be set if the server returned a status code >= 400 (it will be one of the restify HTTP errors). If obj looks like a RestError:

    {
      "code": "FooError",
      "message": "some foo happened"
    }
    

    then err gets "upconverted" into a RestError for you. Otherwise it will be an HttpError.

    createJsonClient(options)

    var client = restify.createJsonClient({
      url: 'https://api.us-east-1.joyent.com',
      version: '*'
    });

    API Options:

    Name Type Description
    accept String Accept header to send
    audit Boolean Enable Audit logging
    auditor Function Function for Audit logging
    connectTimeout Number Amount of time to wait for a socket
    contentType String Content-Type header to send
    requestTimeout Number Amount of time to wait for the request to finish
    dtrace Object node-dtrace-provider handle
    gzip Object Will compress data when sent using content-encoding: gzip
    headers Object HTTP headers to set in all requests
    log Object bunyan instance
    query Object querystring object to be serialized via querystring module
    retry Object options to provide to node-retry;"false" disables retry; defaults to 4 retries
    safeStringify Boolean Safely serialize JSON objects, i.e. circular dependencies
    signRequest Function synchronous callback for interposing headers before request is sent
    url String Fully-qualified URL to connect to
    userAgent String user-agent string to use; restify inserts one, but you can override it
    version String semver string to set the accept-version
    followRedirects Boolean Follow redirects from server
    maxRedirects Number Maximum number of redirects to follow
    proxy String An HTTP proxy URL string (or parsed URL object) to use for requests. If not specified, then the https_proxy or http_proxy environment variables are used. Pass proxy: false to explicitly disable using a proxy (i.e. to ensure a proxy URL is not picked up from environment variables). See the Proxy section below.
    noProxy String A comma-separated list of hosts for which to not use a proxy. If not specified, then then NO_PROXY environment variable is used. One can pass noProxy: '' to explicitly set this empty and ensure a possible environment variable is not used. See the Proxy section below.

    get(path, callback)

    Performs an HTTP get; if no payload was returned, obj defaults to {} for you (so you don't get a bunch of null pointer errors).

    client.get('/foo/bar', function(err, req, res, obj) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%j', obj);
    });

    head(path, callback)

    Just like get, but without obj:

    client.head('/foo/bar', function(err, req, res) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
    });

    post(path, object, callback)

    Takes a complete object to serialize and send to the server.

    client.post('/foo', { hello: 'world' }, function(err, req, res, obj) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
      console.log('%j', obj);
    });

    put(path, object, callback)

    Just like post:

    client.put('/foo', { hello: 'world' }, function(err, req, res, obj) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
      console.log('%j', obj);
    });

    del(path, callback)

    del doesn't take content, since you know, it should't:

    client.del('/foo/bar', function(err, req, res) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
    });

    StringClient

    StringClient is what JsonClient is built on, and provides a base for you to write other buffering/parsing clients (like say an XML client). If you need to talk to some "raw" HTTP server, then StringClient is what you want, as it by default will provide you with content uploads in application/x-www-form-url-encoded and downloads as text/plain. To extend a StringClient, take a look at the source for JsonClient. Effectively, you extend it, and set the appropriate options in the constructor and implement a write (for put/post) and parse method (for all HTTP bodies), and that's it.

    createStringClient(options)

    var client = restify.createStringClient({
      url: 'https://example.com'
    });

    get(path, callback)

    Performs an HTTP get; if no payload was returned, data defaults to '' for you (so you don't get a bunch of null pointer errors).

    client.get('/foo/bar', function(err, req, res, data) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%s', data);
    });

    head(path, callback)

    Just like get, but without data:

    client.head('/foo/bar', function(err, req, res) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
    });

    post(path, object, callback)

    Takes a complete object to serialize and send to the server.

    client.post('/foo', { hello: 'world' }, function(err, req, res, data) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
      console.log('%s', data);
    });

    put(path, object, callback)

    Just like post:

    client.put('/foo', { hello: 'world' }, function(err, req, res, data) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
      console.log('%s', data);
    });

    del(path, callback)

    del doesn't take content, since you know, it should't:

    client.del('/foo/bar', function(err, req, res) {
      assert.ifError(err);
      console.log('%d -> %j', res.statusCode, res.headers);
    });

    HttpClient

    HttpClient is the lowest-level client shipped in restify, and is basically just some sugar over the top of node's http/https modules (with HTTP methods like the other clients). It is useful if you want to stream with restify. Note that the event below is unfortunately named result and not response (because Event 'response' is already used).

    client = restify.createClient({
      url: 'http://127.0.0.1'
    });
     
    client.get('/str/mcavage', function(err, req) {
      assert.ifError(err); // connection error
     
      req.on('result', function(err, res) {
        assert.ifError(err); // HTTP status code >= 400
     
        res.body = '';
        res.setEncoding('utf8');
        res.on('data', function(chunk) {
          res.body += chunk;
        });
     
        res.on('end', function() {
          console.log(res.body);
        });
      });
    });

    Or a write:

    client.post(opts, function(err, req) {
      assert.ifError(connectErr);
     
      req.on('result', function(err, res) {
        assert.ifError(err);
        res.body = '';
        res.setEncoding('utf8');
        res.on('data', function(chunk) {
          res.body += chunk;
        });
     
        res.on('end', function() {
          console.log(res.body);
        });
      });
     
      req.write('hello world');
      req.end();
    });

    Note that get/head/del all call req.end() for you, so you can't write data over those. Otherwise, all the same methods exist as JsonClient/StringClient.

    One wishing to extend the HttpClient should look at the internals and note that read and write probably need to be overridden.

    Proxy

    A restify client can use an HTTP proxy, either via options to createClient or via the http_proxy, https_proxy, and NO_PROXY environment variables common in many tools (e.g., curl).

    restify.createClient({
      proxy: <proxy url string or object>,
      noProxy: <boolean>
    });

    The proxy option to createClient specifies the proxy URL, for example:

    proxy: 'http://user:password@example.com:4321'

    Or a proxy object can be given. (Warning: the proxyAuth field is not what a simple require('url').parse() will produce if your proxy URL has auth info.)

    proxy: {
      protocol: 'http:',
      host: 'example.com',
      port: 4321,
      proxyAuth: 'user:password'
    }

    Or proxy: false can be given to explicitly disable using a proxy -- i.e. to ensure a proxy URL is not picked up from environment variables.

    If not specified, then the following environment variables (in the given order) are used to pick up a proxy URL:

    HTTPS_PROXY
    https_proxy
    HTTP_PROXY
    http_proxy
    

    Note: A future major version of restify(-clients) might change this environment variable behaviour. See the discussion on this issue.

    The noProxy option can be used to exclude some hosts from using a given proxy. If it is not specified, then the NO_PROXY or no_proxy environment variable is used. Use noProxy: '' to override a possible environment variable, but not match any hosts.

    The value is a string giving a comma-separated set of host, host-part suffix, or the special '*' to indicate all hosts. (Its definition is intended to match curl's NO_PROXY environment variable.) Some examples:

    $ export NO_PROXY='*'               # don't proxy requests to any urls
    $ export NO_PROXY='127.0.0.1'       # don't proxy requests the localhost IP
    $ export NO_PROXY='localhost:8000'  # ... 'localhost' hostname and port 8000
    $ export NO_PROXY='google.com'      # ... "google.com" and "*.google.com"
    $ export NO_PROXY='www.google.com'  # ... "www.google.com"
    $ export NO_PROXY='127.0.0.1, google.com'   # multiple hosts
    

    Note: The url being requested must match the full hostname or hostname part to a '.': NO_PROXY=oogle.com does not match "google.com". DNS lookups are not performed to determine the IP address of a hostname.

    basicAuth(username, password)

    Since it hasn't been mentioned yet, this convenience method (available on all clients), just sets the Authorization header for all HTTP requests:

    client.basicAuth('mark', 'mysupersecretpassword');

    Upgrades

    If you successfully negotiate an Upgrade with the HTTP server, an upgradeResult event will be emitted with the arguments err, res, socket and head. You can use this functionality to establish a WebSockets connection with a server. For example, using the watershed library:

    var ws = new Watershed();
    var wskey = ws.generateKey();
    var options = {
      path: '/websockets/attach',
      headers: {
        connection: 'upgrade',
        upgrade: 'websocket',
        'sec-websocket-key': wskey,
      }
    };
    client.get(options, function(err, res, socket, head) {
      res.once('upgradeResult', function(err2, res2, socket2, head2) {
        var shed = ws.connect(res2, socket2, head2, wskey);
        shed.on('text', function(msg) {
          console.log('message from server: ' + msg);
          shed.end();
        });
        shed.send('greetings program');
      });
    });

    Timings

    Request timings are available under the req.getTimings() in milliseconds:

    {
      dnsLookup: 34,
      tcpConnection: 52,
      tlsHandshake: 112,
      firstByte: 66,
      contentTransfer: 2,
      total: 266
    }

    All timings except total can be null under various circumstances like keep-alive connection, missing https etc.

    Contributing

    Add unit tests for any new or changed functionality. Ensure that lint and style checks pass.

    To start contributing, install the git pre-push hooks:

    make githooks

    Before committing, run the prepush hook:

    make prepush

    If you have style errors, you can auto fix whitespace issues by running:

    make codestyle-fix

    License

    Copyright (c) 2015 Alex Liu

    Licensed under the MIT license.

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    npm i restify-clients

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    version

    2.0.2

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