render-html

1.2.1 • Public • Published

render-html

This library easily and intuitively allows developers to perform transforms on HTML string input, by specifying custom logic.

Installation

$ npm install --save render-html

Usage

var render = require('render-html');
 
render.element = function (toString) {
    if (this.name === 'span') return this.innerHTML;
    else return toString.call(this);
};
 
render('<div class="foo"><span>hello world</span></div>')
    .then(function (result) {
        console.log(result); // <div class="foo">hello world</div>
    });
render.text = function (toString) {
    if (this.parent.name === 'span') return 'unicorn';
    else return toString.call(this);
};
 
render('<div class="foo"><span>hello world</span></div>')
    .then(function (result) {
        console.log(result); // <div class="foo"><span>unicorn</span></div>
    });
render.attribute = function () {
    if (this.name === this.value) return 'cat="power"';
    // If a string is not returned, the default toString method is used anyway
};
 
render('<div class="foo" id="id" bar="baz"></div>')
    .then(function (result) {
        console.log(result); // <div class="foo" cat="power" bar="baz"></div>
    });

API

render has three properties to which you can assign functions:

  • render.element
  • render.attribute
  • render.text

These functions dictate how those types of nodes are rendered in the result string.

As an example, if you assign a function to render.element, that function is called within the context of each element found in your input string. In other words, the function's this value is always an HTML Element. The return value is how the element will display in the final result string.

You can return any string, as shown here:

render.element = function () {return '*';}
render('<div></div><img><footer></footer> <b></b>')
    .then(function (result) {
        console.log(result); // "*** *";
    });

The first argument of these functions is the original toString method, which you can use to render the node in its default way. There are examples of this in the usage section.

NOTE: if a string is not returned (i.e., if you return undefined), the original toString method is used anyway. So you don't actually need to use this argument to render a node in its default way. It is typically used if you plan on augmenting the default rendering (with regular expressions, for example).

render.reset() is also available to reset all three rendering functions back to their default state.

Element

this.name - the name of the element's tag, lowercased ("div", "span", etc.)

this.children - an array of every child element or text node

this.attributes - an array of the element's attributes

this.parent - a reference to the parent element (or the DOM root)

this.innerHTML - a getter which returns the element's rendered contents

this.innerAttributes - a getter which returns the element's rendered attribute string

this.startTag - a getter which returns the element's rendered start tag, including its name and innerAttributes

this.endTag - a getter which returns the elements's rendered end tag (an empty string for void elements, such as <img>)

this.closeTag - alias for this.endTag

this.getAttribute(name) - a method which returns the string value of the specified attribute (null, if the attribute does not exist on the element)

this.hasAttribute(name) - a method which returns true or false, whether the element has the specified attribute

this.isVoid() - a method which returns true or false, whether the element is a void element (such as <img> and <br>)

this.isElement - a getter which returns true (note that is not a method)

Attribute

this.name - the name of the attribute, lowercased ("class", "src", etc.)

this.value - the value of the attribute, always a string

this.owner - a reference to the element which owns this attribute

this.isAttribute - a getter which returns true

Text

this.value - the string of text that this node represents

this.parent - a reference to the parent element (or the DOM root)

this.isText - a getter which returns true

DOM root

When you use this.parent with top-level elements or text nodes, you'll get a reference to the DOM root, which has no properties other than children, which is an array, just like the children property of an element.

this.isRoot - a getter which returns true

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Install

npm i render-html

Weekly Downloads

9

Version

1.2.1

License

MIT

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Collaborators

  • joshuawise