Nietzsche's Preposterous Moustache

    regedit

    5.0.0 • Public • Published

    regedit

    Read, Write, List and do all sorts of funky stuff to the windows registry using node.js and windows script host.

    No pesky native code :-)

    Install

    NPM NPM

    Example

    var regedit = require('regedit')
    
    regedit.list('HKCU\\SOFTWARE', function(err, result) {
        ...
    })
    
    regedit.putValue({
        'HKCU\\SOFTWARE\\MyApp': {
            'Company': {
                value: 'Moo corp',
                type: 'REG_SZ'
            },
            'Version': { ... }
        },
        'HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MyApp2': { ... }
    }, function(err) {
        ...
    })
    
    regedit.createKey(['HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\Moo', 'HKCU\\SOFTWARE\\Foo'], function(err) {
        ...
    })

    Friendly warning regarding 32bit and 64bit OS / Process

    When launching a 32bit application in 64bit environment, some of your paths will be relative to wow6432node. Things might get a little unexpected if you try to find something you thought was in HKLM\Software when in fact it is located at HKLM\Software\wow6432node. To overcome this the arch methods were added.

    Further reading here

    A note about Electron

    This software uses Windows Script Host to read and write to the registry. For that purpose, it will execute .wsf files. When packaging the app's dependencies with ASAR, node-regedit will not be able to access the windows script files, because they are bundled in a single ASAR file. Therefore it is necessary to store the .wsf files elsewhere, outside of the packaged asar file. You can set your custom location for the files with setExternalVBSLocation(location):

    // Assuming the files lie in <app>/resources/my-location
    const vbsDirectory = path.join(path.dirname(electron.remote.app.getPath('exe')), './resources/my-location');
    regedit.setExternalVBSLocation(vbsDirectory);
    

    Also, take a look at #60

    API

    Every command executes a sub process that runs vbscript code. To boost efficiency, every command supports batching.

    Reading keys and values

    regedit.list([String|Array], [Function])

    Lists the direct content of one or more sub keys. Specify an array instead of a string to query multiple keys in the same run.

    Given the command:

    regedit.list(['HKCU\\SOFTWARE', 'HKLM\\SOFTWARE', 'HKCU\\IM_FAKE_THEREFOR_I_DONT_EXIST'], function(err, result) {
        ...
    })

    Result will be an object with the following structure:

    {
        'HKCU\\SOFTWARE': {
            exists: true,
            keys: [ 'Google', 'Microsoft', ... more direct sub keys ]
            values: {
                'valueName': {
                    value: '123',
                    type: 'REG_SZ'
                }
                ... more direct child values of HKCU\\SOFTWARE
            }
        },
        'HKLM\\SOFTWARE': {
            exists: true,
            keys: [ 'Google', 'Microsoft', ... more direct sub keys ]
            values: {
                'valueName': {
                    value: '123',
                    type: 'REG_SZ'
                }
                ... more direct child values of HKLM\\SOFTWARE
            }
        },
        'HKCU\\IM_FAKE_THEREFOR_I_DONT_EXIST': {
            exists: false,
            keys: [],
            values: {}
        }
    }
    Note about listing default values

    In the windows registry a key may have a default value. When enumarting value names, the default value's name will be empty. This presents a minor problem when including the empty value in a set with other values since it cannot be safely named with anything but the empty string, for fear of collision with other values.

    Thus, accessing the default value becomes slightly awkward:

    regedit.list('path\\to\\default\\value', function (err, result) {
        var defaultValue = result['path\\to\\default\\value'].values[''].value
    })

    For now this is how its going to be, but in the future this will probably change, possibly in a way that will effect the whole interface.

    list with callback api will be deperecated and eventually removed in future versions, take a look at the streaming interface below

    regedit.list([String|Array]) - streaming interface

    Same as regedit.list([String|Array], [Function]) exposes a streaming interface instead of a callback. This is useful for situations where you have a lot of data coming in and out of the list process. Eventually this will completely replace the list() with callback api

    This operation will mutate the keys array

    Example:

    regedit.list(['HKCU\\SOFTWARE', 'HKLM\\SOFTWARE'])
    .on('data', function(entry) {
        console.log(entry.key)
        console.log(entry.data)
    })
    .on('finish', function () {
        console.log('list operation finished')
    })

    This code output will look like this:

    HKCU\\SOFTWARE
    {
        keys: [ 'Google', 'Microsoft', ... more direct sub keys ]
        values: {
            'valueName': {
                value: '123',
                type: 'REG_SZ'
            }
            ... more direct child values of HKCU\\SOFTWARE
        }
    }
    HKLM\\SOFTWARE
    {
        keys: [ 'Google', 'Microsoft', ... more direct sub keys ]
        values: {
            'valueName': {
                value: '123',
                type: 'REG_SZ'
            }
            ... more direct child values of HKLM\\SOFTWARE    
        }
    }
    

    regedit.arch.list32([String|Array], [Function])

    same as regedit.list([String|Array], [Function]), only force a 32bit architecture on the registry

    regedit.arch.list32([String|Array])

    streaming interface, see regedit.list([String|Array])

    regedit.arch.list64([String|Array], [Function])

    same as list, only force a 64bit architecture on the registry

    regedit.arch.list64([String|Array])

    streaming interface, see regedit.list([String|Array])

    regedit.arch.list([String|Array], [Function])

    same as list, only force your system architecture on the registry (select automatically between list64 and list32)

    regedit.arch.list([String|Array])

    streaming interface, see regedit.list([String|Array])

    Manipulating the registry

    regedit.createKey([String|Array], [Function])

    Creates one or more keys in the registry This operation will mutate the keys array

    regedit.deleteKey([String|Array], [Function])

    Deletes one or more keys in the registry This operation will mutate the keys array

    regedit.putValue(Object, Function)

    Put one or more values in the registry. The Object given to this function is almost identical to the result of regedit.list().

    Here is an example:

    var valuesToPut = {
        'HKCU\\Software\\MySoftware': {
            'myValue1': {
                value: [1,2,3],
                type: 'REG_BINARY'
            },
            'myValue2': {
                value: 'aString',
                type: 'REG_SZ'
            }
        },
        'HKCU\\Software\\MySoftware\\foo': {
            'myValue3': {
                value: ['a', 'b', 'c']
                type: 'REG_MULTI_SZ'
            }
        }
    }
    
    regedit.putValue(valuesToPut, function(err) {
    
    })

    Supported value types are:

    • REG_SZ, REG_EXPAND_SZ: a string basically
    • REG_DWORD, REG_QWORD: should use javascript numbers
    • REG_MULTI_SZ: an array of strings
    • REG_BINARY: an array of numbers (representing bytes)
    • REG_DEFAULT: see note about default values below
    Note about setting default values

    When including a default value in a putValue operation, one must use the REG_DEFAULT type. Further more, the name of the value is insignificant since in the registry the default value has no name, but because of the way the node and the vb processes communicate a name must be used. Please note that the only legal value type of a default value is REG_SZ

    this is a temporary solution and is subject to change in future versions

    var values = {
        'HKCU\\Software\\MySoftware': {
            'someNameIDontCareAbout': {
                value: 'Must be a string',
                type: 'REG_DEFAULT'
            },
            'myValue2': {
                value: 'aString',
                type: 'REG_SZ'
            }
        }
    }
    regedit.putValue(values, function (err) {    
    })

    For now this is how its going to be, but in the future this will probably change, possibly in a way that will effect the whole interface.

    regedit.deleteValue([String|Array], [Function])

    Deletes one or more values in the registry This operation will mutate the keys array

    Promises

    To use promises access the function you want through regedit.promisified, all function signatures are the same ([String|Array], [Arch (optional)])

    Default arch is agnostic.

    Example: regedit.promisified.list([String|Array], [Arch (optional)])

    try {
        const registryList = await regedit.promisified.list(['HKCU\\SOFTWARE', 'HKLM\\SOFTWARE', 'HKCU\\IM_FAKE_THEREFOR_I_DONT_EXIST'])
    } catch (e) {
        console.log('Error while listing keys:', e.message)
    }

    Result and errors should be the same as not promisified.

    Develop

    Run tests

        mocha -R spec
    

    Enable debug output

        set DEBUG=regedit
    

    TODO

    None :)

    Install

    npm i regedit

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    9,512

    Version

    5.0.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    179 kB

    Total Files

    35

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • kessler
    • ironsource
    • yaniv