redux-saga-routines
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    3.2.3 • Public • Published

    redux-saga-routines

    A smart action creator for Redux. Useful for any kind of async actions like fetching data. Also fully compatible with Redux Saga and Redux Form.

    Why do I need this?

    Reduce boilerplate from your source code when making requests to API or validating forms build on top of Redux Form.

    Installation

    yarn add redux-saga-routines

    or

    npm install --save redux-saga-routines

    What is routine?

    Routine is a smart action creator that encapsulates 5 action types and 5 action creators to make standard actions lifecycle easy-to-use:

    TRIGGER -> REQUEST -> SUCCESS / FAILURE -> FULFILL

    So, with redux-saga-routines you don't need to create all these action type constants and action creators manually, just use createRoutine:

    import { createRoutine } from 'redux-saga-routines';
     
    // creating routine
    const routine = createRoutine('ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX');

    'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX' passed to createRoutine is a name of routine (and a prefix for all it's action types).

    You can access all action types using TRIGGER, REQUEST, SUCCESS, FAILURE, FULFILL attributes of routine object:

    console.log(routine.TRIGGER); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/TRIGGER';
     
    console.log(routine.REQUEST); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/REQUEST';
     
    console.log(routine.SUCCESS); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/SUCCESS';
     
    console.log(routine.FAILURE); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/FAILURE';
     
    console.log(routine.FULFILL); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/FULFILL';

    You also have 5 action creators: trigger, request, success, failure, fulfill:

    console.log(routine.trigger(payload)); 
    // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload };
     
    console.log(routine.request(payload)); 
    // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/REQUEST', payload };
     
    console.log(routine.success(payload)); 
    // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/SUCCESS', payload };
     
    console.log(routine.failure(payload)); 
    // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/FAILURE', payload };
     
    console.log(routine.fulfill(payload)); 
    // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/FULFILL', payload };

    Routine by itself is a trigger action creator function:

    // following calls will give you the same result
    console.log(routine(payload)); // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload };
    console.log(routine.trigger(payload)); // { type: 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload };

    Every routine's action creator is a Flux Standard Action

    Payload and meta creators for routines

    redux-saga-routines based on redux-actions, so createRoutine actually accepts 3 parameters: (actionTypePrefix, payloadCreator, metaCreator) => function.

    Changing action payload with payloadCreator

    You may pass a function as a second argument to createRoutine and it will be used as a payload creator:

    const routine = createRoutine('PREFIX', (value) => value * 2);
     
    console.log(routine.trigger(1)); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: 2 }
     
    console.log(routine.request(2)); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: 4 }
     
    console.log(routine.success(3)); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: 6 }
     
    console.log(routine.failure(4)); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: 8 }
     
    console.log(routine.fulfill(5));
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: 10 }

    You may also pass object as a second argument to define unique payload creator for each action:

    const payloadCreator = {
      trigger: (payload) => ({ ...payload, trigger: true }), // we may use payload creator to extend payload
      request: ({ id }) => ({ id }), // or to filter its values
      success: (payload) => ({ ...payload, data: parseData(payload.data) }), // or to change payload on the fly 
      failure: (payload) => ({ errorMessage: parseError(payload.error), error: true }), // or to do all of these at once
      fulfill: () => ({}), // or to completely change/remove payload ...
    };
     
    const routine = createRoutine('PREFIX', payloadCreator); // passing object as a second parameter
     
    console.log(routine.trigger({ id: 42 })); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: { id: 42, trigger: true } }
     
    console.log(routine.request({ id: 42, foo: 'bar' })); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: { id: 42 } }
     
    console.log(routine.success({ id: 42, data: 'something' })); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: { id: 42, data: parseData('something') } }
     
    console.log(routine.failure({ id: 42, error: 'oops...' })); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: { error: true, errorMessage: parseError('oops..') } }
     
    console.log(routine.fulfill({ id: 42, foo: 'bar', baz: 'zab' })); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}} }

    You may use lower or uppercase for payloadCreator-object keys:

    const payloadCreator = {
      trigger: () => {}, // lowercase is okay
      REQUEST: () => {}, // uppercase is okay as well
    };

    Adding or changing action meta with metaCreator

    createRoutine accept third parameter and treat it as metaCreator. It works almost the same as payloadCreator (function or object is accepted) the only difference is it works with action.meta instead of action.payload parameter:

    const simpleMetaCreator = () => ({ foo: 'bar' });
    const routineWithSimpleMeta = createRoutine('PREFIX', null, simpleMetaCreator);
     
    console.log(routineWithSimpleMeta.trigger()); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}, meta: { foo: 'bar' } }
     
    const complexMetaCreator = {
      trigger: () => ({ trigger: true }),
      request: () => ({ ignoreCache: true }),
      success: () => ({ saveToCache: true }),
      failure: () => ({ logSomewhere: true }),
      fulfill: () => ({ yo: 'bro!' }),
    };
     
    const routineWithComplexMeta =  createRoutine('PREFIX', null, complexMetaCreator);
    console.log(routineWithSimpleMeta.trigger()); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}, meta: { trigger: true } }
     
    console.log(routineWithSimpleMeta.request()); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}, meta: { ignoreCache: true } }
     
    console.log(routineWithSimpleMeta.success()); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}, meta: { saveToCache: true } }
     
    console.log(routineWithSimpleMeta.failure()); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}, meta: { logSomewhere: true } }
     
    console.log(routineWithSimpleMeta.fulfill()); 
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TRIGGER', payload: {}, meta: { yo: 'bro!' } }

    Creating your own routines

    Sometimes you may need custom routines, so now you are able to create your own routine creator to get them!

    import { createRoutineCreator } from 'redux-saga-routines';
     
    const createToggleRoutine = createRoutineCreator(['SHOW', 'HIDE', 'TOGGLE']);
    console.log(createToggleRoutine.STAGES);
    // ['SHOW', 'HIDE', 'TOGGLE']
     
    const myToggler = createToggleRoutine('PREFIX'/*, payloadCreator, metaCreator*/);
    console.log(myToggler._STAGES);
    // ['SHOW', 'HIDE', 'TOGGLE']
     
    console.log(myToggler._PREFIX);
    // 'PREFIX'
     
    console.log(myToggler.SHOW);
    // 'PREFIX/SHOW'
     
    console.log(myToggler.HIDE);
    // 'PREFIX/HIDE'
     
    console.log(myToggler.TOGGLE);
    // 'PREFIX/TOGGLE'
     
    console.log(myToggler.show(payload));
    // { type: 'PREFIX/SHOW', payload }
     
    console.log(myToggler.hide(payload));
    // { type: 'PREFIX/HIDE', payload }
     
    console.log(myToggler.toggle(payload));
    // { type: 'PREFIX/TOGGLE', payload } 

    So, now you are able to group any actions into custom routine and use it as you want!

    createRoutineCreator also accepts custom separator as a second parameter, so you are able to change slash / with anything you want:

    import { createRoutineCreator, defaultRoutineStages } from 'redux-saga-routines';
     
    const createUnderscoreRoutine = createRoutineCreator(defaultRoutineStages, '_');
    const routine = createUnderscoreRoutine('ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX');
     
    console.log(routine.TRIGGER); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX_TRIGGER';
     
    console.log(routine.REQUEST); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX_REQUEST';
     
    console.log(routine.SUCCESS); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX_SUCCESS';
     
    console.log(routine.FAILURE); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX_FAILURE';
     
    console.log(routine.FULFILL); 
    // 'ACTION_TYPE_PREFIX_FULFILL';

    In example above you may notice, that default routine stages are also exported from the package, so you may use them to create your own extended routine. Now all the power is in your hands, use it as you want!

    Usage examples

    Example: fetching data from server

    Let's start with creating routine for fetching some data from server:

    // routines.js
     
    import { createRoutine } from 'redux-saga-routines';
    export const fetchData = createRoutine('FETCH_DATA');

    Then, let's create some component, that triggers data fetching:

    // FetchButton.js
     
    import { connect } from 'react-redux';
    import { fetchData } from './routines'; // import our routine
     
    class FetchButton extends React.Component {
      static mapStateToProps = (state) => {
        return {...}; // map some state to component props
      }
      static mapDispatchToProps = {
        fetchData,
      };
     
      onClick() {
        this.props.fetchData(); // dispatching routine trigger action
      }
     
      render() {
        return (
          <button onClick={() => this.onClick()}>
            Fetch data from server
          </button>
        );
      }
    }
     
    export default connect(FetchButton.mapStateToProps, FetchButton.mapDispatchToProps)(FetchButton);

    Now, let's take a look at reducer example:

    // reducer.js
     
    import { fetchData } from './routines';
     
    const initialState = {
      data: null,
      loading: false,
      error: null,
    };
     
    export default function exampleReducer(state = initialState, action) {
      switch (action.type) {
        case fetchData.TRIGGER:
          return {
            ...state,
            loading: true,
          };
        case fetchData.SUCCESS:
          return {
            ...state,
            data: action.payload,
          };
        case fetchData.FAILURE:
          return {
            ...state,
            error: action.payload,
          };
        case fetchData.FULFILL:
          return {
            ...state,
            loading: false,
          };
        default:
          return state;
      }
    }

    And, saga (but you can use any other middleware, like redux-thunk):

    // saga.js
     
    import { fetchData } from './routines';
     
    function* requestWatcherSaga() {
      // run fetchDataFromServer on every trigger action
      yield takeEvery(fetchData.TRIGGER, fetchDataFromServer)
    }
     
    function* fetchDataFromServer() {
      try {
        // trigger request action
        yield put(fetchData.request());
        // perform request to '/some_url' to fetch some data
        const response = yield call(apiClient.request, '/some_url');
        // if request successfully finished
        yield put(fetchData.success(response.data));
      } catch (error) {
        // if request failed
        yield put(fetchData.failure(error.message));
      } finally {
        // trigger fulfill action
        yield put(fetchData.fulfill());
      }
    }

    Filtering actions

    It is a common case to ignore some triggered actions and not to perform API request every time. For example, let's make a saga, that perform API request only on odd button clicks (1st, 3rd, 5th, ...):

    // saga.js
     
    import { fetchData } from './routines';
     
    function* requestWatcherSaga() {
      // run handleTriggerAction on every trigger action
      yield takeEvery(fetchData.TRIGGER, handleTriggerAction)
    }
     
    let counter = 0;
    function* handleTriggerAction() {
      if (counter++ % 2 === 0) {
        // perform API request only on odd calls
        yield call(fetchDataFromServer);
      }
     
      // trigger fulfill action to finish routine lifecycle on every click
      yield put(fetchData.fulfill());
    }
     
    function* fetchDataFromServer() {
      try {
        // trigger request action
        yield put(fetchData.request());
        // perform request to '/some_url' to fetch some data
        const response = yield call(apiClient.request, '/some_url');
        // if request successfully finished
        yield put(fetchData.success(response.data));
      } catch (error) {
        // if request failed
        yield put(fetchData.failure(error.message));
      }
    }

    Wrap routine into promise

    Sometimes it is useful to use promises (especially with 3rd-party components). With redux-saga-routines you are able to wrap your routine into promise and handle it in your saga! To achive this just add routinePromiseWatcherSaga in your sagaMiddleware.run(), for example like this:

    import { routinePromiseWatcherSaga } from 'redux-saga-routines';
     
    const sagas = [
      yourFirstSaga,
      yourOtherSaga,
      // ...,
      routinePromiseWatcherSaga,
    ];
    sagas.forEach((saga) => sagaMiddleware.run(saga));

    Now we are ready. There is special promisifyRoutine helper, that wraps your routine in function with signature: (payload, dispatch) => Promise. See example below: First, create routine:

    // routines.js
     
    import { createRoutine, promisifyRoutine } from 'redux-saga-routines';
    export const myRoutine = createRoutine('MY_ROUTINE');
    export const myRoutinePromiseCreator = promisifyRoutine(myRoutine);

    Then, use it in your form component:

    // MyComponent.js
    import { bindPromiseCreators } from 'redux-saga-routines';
    import { myRoutine, myRoutinePromiseCreator } from './routines';
     
    // since promise creator signature is (values, dispatch) => Promise
    // we have to bind it to dispatch using special helper bindPromiseCreator
     
    class MyComponent extends React.Component {
      static mapStateToProps(state) {
        // return props object from selected from state
      }
     
      static mapDispatchToProps(dispatch) {
        return {
          ...bindPromiseCreators({
            myRoutinePromiseCreator,
            // other promise creators can be here...
          }, dispatch),
     
          // here you can use bindActionCreators from redux
          // to bind simple action creators
          // ...bindActionCreators({ mySimpleAction1, mySimpleAction2 }, dispatch)
     
          // or other helpers to bind other functions to store's dispatch
          // ...
     
          // or just pass dispatch as a prop to component
          dispatch,
        };
      }
     
     
      handleClick() {
        const promise = this.props.myRoutinePromiseCreator(somePayload);
        // so, call of myRoutinePromiseCreator returns promise
        // you can use this promise as you want
     
        promise.then(
          (successPayload) => console.log('success :)', successPayload),
          (failurePayload) => console.log('failure :(', failurePayload),
        );
     
     
        // internally when you call myRoutinePromiseCreator() special action with type ROUTINE_PROMISE_ACTION is dispatched
        // this special action is handled by routinePromiseWatcherSaga
     
        // to resolve promise you need to dispatch myRoutine.success(successPayload) action, successPayload will be passed to resolved promise
        // if  myRoutine.failure(failurePayload) is dispatched, promise will be rejected with failurePayload.
     
        // we just want to wait 5 seconds and then resolve promise with 'voila!' message:
        setTimeout(
          () => this.props.dispatch(myRoutine.success('voila!')),
          5000,
        );
     
        // same example, but with promise rejection:
        // setTimeout(
        //   () => this.props.dispatch(myRoutine.failure('something went wrong...')),
        //   5000,
        // );
     
        // of course you don't have to do it in your component
        // you can do it in your saga
        // see below
      }
     
      render() {
        return (
          <button onClick={() => this.handleClick()}>
            {/* your form fields here... */}
          </form>
        );
      }
    }
     
    export default connect(MyComponent.mapStateToProps, MyComponent.mapDispatchToProps)(MyComponent);

    You are able to resolve/reject given promise in your saga:

    // saga.js
    import { myRoutine } from './routines';
     
    function* myRoutineTriggerWatcher() {
      // when you call myRoutinePromiseCreator(somePayload)
      // internally myRoutine.trigger(somePayload) action is dispatched
      // we take every routine trigger actions and handle them
      yield takeEvery(myRoutine.TRIGGER, handleTriggerAction)
    }
     
    function* handleTriggerAction(action) {
      const { payload } = action; // here payload is somePayload passed from myRoutinePromiseCreator(somePayload)
      const isDataCorrect = verifyData(payload);
     
      if (isDataCorrect) {
        // send data to server
        yield call(sendFormDataToServer, payload);
      } else {
        // reject given promise
        yield put(myRoutine.failure('something went wrong'));
      }
     
      // trigger fulfill action to end routine lifecycle
      yield put(myRoutine.fulfill());
    }
     
    function* sendFormDataToServer(data) {
      try {
        // trigger request action
        yield put(myRoutine.request());
        // perform request to '/endpoint'
        const response = yield call(apiClient.request, '/endpoint', data);
        // if request successfully finished we resolve promise with response data
        yield put(myRoutine.success(response.data));
      } catch (error) {
        // if request failed we reject promise with error message
        yield put(myRoutine.failure(error.message);
      }
    }

    redux-saga, redux-form, redux-saga-routines combo

    You are also allowed to use combo of redux-saga, redux-form and redux-saga-routines! Since redux-form validation based on promises, you are able to handle redux-form validation in your saga. To achive this just add routinePromiseWatcherSaga in your sagaMiddleware.run(), like in example above.

    There is a special bindRoutineToReduxForm helper, that wraps your routine in function with redux-form compatible signature: (values, dispatch, props) => Promise (it works just like promisifyRoutine but more specific to be compatible with full redux-form functionality)

    First, create routine and it's wrapper for redux-form:

    // routines.js
     
    import { createRoutine, bindRoutineToReduxForm } from 'redux-saga-routines';
    export const submitFormRoutine = createRoutine('SUBMIT_MY_FORM');
    export const submitFormHandler = bindRoutineToReduxForm(submitFormRoutine);

    Then, use it in your form component:

    // MyForm.js
     
    import { reduxForm } from 'redux-form';
    import { submitFormHandler } from './routines';
     
    // you do not need to bind your handler to store, since `redux-form` pass `dispatch` to handler.
     
    class MyForm extends React.Component {
      render() {
        return (
          <form onSubmit={this.props.handleSubmit(submitFormHandler)}>
            {/* your form fields here... */}
          </form>
        );
      }
    }
     
    export default reduxForm()(MyForm);

    Now you are able to handle form submission in your saga:

    // saga.js
    import { SubmissionError } from 'redux-form';
    import { submitFormRoutine } from './routines';
     
    function* validateFormWatcherSaga() {
      // run validation on every trigger action
      yield takeEvery(submitFormRoutine.TRIGGER, validate)
    }
     
    function* validate(action) {
      // redux-form pass form values and component props to submit handler
      // so they passed to trigger action as an action payload
      const { values, props } = action.payload;
     
      if (!isValid(values, props)) {
        // client-side validation failed
        const errors = getFormErrors(values, props);
        // reject promise given to redux-form, pass errors as SubmissionError object according to redux-form docs
        yield put(submitFormRoutine.failure(new SubmissionError(errors)));
      } else {
        // send form data to server
        yield call(sendFormDataToServer, values);
      }
     
      // trigger fulfill action to end routine lifecycle
      yield put(submitFormRoutine.fulfill());
    }
     
    function* sendFormDataToServer(formData) {
      try {
        // trigger request action
        yield put(submitFormRoutine.request());
        // perform request to '/submit' to send form data
        const response = yield call(apiClient.request, '/submit', formData);
        // if request successfully finished
        yield put(submitFormRoutine.success(response.data));
      } catch (error) {
        // if request failed
        yield put(submitFormRoutine.failure(new SubmissionError({ _error: error.message })));
      }
    }

    Version 2

    Module was totally reworked since version 2.0.0. If you still using version 1.* see version 1 docs

    License

    MIT

    Install

    npm i redux-saga-routines

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    10,492

    Version

    3.2.3

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    163 kB

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