react-typesafe-routes
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2.0.0-alpha.0 • Public • Published

React (Awesome) Typesafe Routes

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The last routing library you will ever need in your React projects. (At least if you're using react-router–dom but also why wouldn't you?)

Typedoc documentation

Table of Contents

Installing

Make sure you are using at least Typescript 4.1.2 in your project. To find out what version you are using use npm ls typescript. There is a known issue with react-scripts 4.0.1 still requiring Typescript 3 but you can circumvent that by adding a --legacy-peer-deps to your install command.

npm install react-typesafe-routes

or

yarn add react-typesafe-routes

Example

Router definition

const defaultOptions = {
  appBar: true,
};

const AuthMiddleware: RouteMiddleware = next => {
  if (isAuthenticated) {
    return next;
  } else {
    return () => <Redirect to={router.login()} />;
  }
};

export const router = OptionsRouter(defaultOptions, route => ({
  home: route('/', {
    component: HomePage,
  }),
  login: route('/login', {
    component: LoginPage,
    options: { appBar: false },
  }),
  players: route(
    '/players',
    {
      component: PlayersPage,
      middleware: AuthMiddleware,
    },
    route => ({
      info: route(
        '/:name/:id',
        {
          component: PlayerInfoPage,
          params: {
            name: stringParser,
            id: intParser,
          },
        },
        route => ({
          rating: route('/rating/:id', {
            component: PlayerRatingPage,
            params: { id: intParser },
          }),
          ban: route('/rating/:id', {
            component: PlayerRatingPage,
            params: { id: intParser },
          }),
        })
      ),
    })
  ),
}));

Usage in App

The BrowserRouter comes from react-router-dom you can use any Router from that package that you like.

const AppBar = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <ul>
        <li>
          <Link to={router.home()}>Home</Link>
        </li>
        <li>
          <Link to={router.player()}>Players</Link>
        </li>
      </ul>
    </div>
  );
};

const App = () => {
  const { appBar } = useRouteOptions(router);

  return (
    <BrowserRouter>
      <div>
        {appBar && <AppBar />}
        <RouterSwitch router={router} />
      </div>
    </BrowserRouter>
  );
};

Route programmatically

To go to a route programmatically / without a Link Component:

const navigate = useNavigate();
navigate(router.players().player({ id: 1, name: 'playerName' }).$);

The function will require you to input required parameters and don't forget the dollar sign at the end.

Types of Routers

OptionsRouter

This is the router most people will probably use. It supports Global options that configurable on a per Route basis and they automatically apply for child routes.

For example the login route is supposed to be full screen and doesn't require the AppBar.

const defaultOptions = {
  appBar: true,
};

const router = OptionsRouter(defaultOptions, route => ({
  home: route('/', {
    component: HomePage,
  }),
  login: route('/login', {
    component: LoginPage,
    options: { appBar: false }
  }),
});

const App = () => {
  const options = useRouteOptions(router);

  return (
    <div>
      {options.appBar && <AppBar>}
      <RouterSwitch router={router} />
    </div>
  );
};

Router

The Router is basically the same as the OptionsRouter but it doesn't have Options as the name already implied. No idea why you would need this but it's there just in case.

const router = Router(route => ({
  home: route('/', {
    component: HomePage,
  }),
  login: route('/login', {
    component: LoginPage,
  }),
});

const App = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <RouterSwitch router={router} />
    </div>
  );
};

Routes

Routes can only be create inside an OptionsRouter or a Router.

const options = { appBar: true };
const router = OptionsRouter(options, route => ({
  home: route(
    /**
     * The route template
    */
    '',
    {
      // The Component to be rendered on this route.
      component: RouteComponent;

      // The Parsers for the parameters in this route.
      params: Record<string, ParamParser<any>>;

      // A middleware for this route
      middleware?: RouteMiddleware;

      // Global options for this route
      options?: Partial<RO>;

      // Wether or not to include this routes child routes in a RouterSwitch  - Defaults to true
      includeChildren?: boolean;
    }
  ),
});

Route Template and Parameters

Every route requires a component to be defined and for every parameter you define you are required to define a parser.

Basic parameters

Basic parameters are defined with a colon in front of them.

const router = Route(route => ({
  test: route('test/:id', {
    component: TestPage,
    params: {
      id: intParser,
    },
  }),
}));

Optional parameters

If you want a parameter to be optional you can add a question mark behind it. Optional parameters still require a parser to be defined.

const router = Route(route => ({
  test: route('test/:id?', {
    component: TestPage,
    params: {
      id: intParser,
    },
  }),
}));

Query parameters

A query parameter has an ampersand in front of it, they can be chained and also be made optional with a question mark.

const router = Route(route => ({
  test: route('test/:id?&:filter&:page?', {
    component: TestPage,
    params: {
      id: intParser,
      page: intParser,
      filter: stringParser,
    },
  }),
}));

Child Routes

Child routes can be defined with the third argument of the route function - Another route function!

const router = Route(route => ({
  test: route(
    'test/:id?&:filter&:page?',
    {
      component: TestPage,
      params: {
        id: intParser,
        page: intParser,
        filter: stringParser,
      },
    },
    route => ({
      child: route('test'),
    })
  ),
}));

Parameter Parsers

Every parameter has a parser which makes useRouteParams possible.

Available Parsers

The following are self explanatory:

  • stringParser
  • floatParser
  • intParser
  • dateParser
  • booleanParser

But there is also the stringListParser used like this:

// Probably defined in your Page file
const testTabs = ['overview', 'statistics', 'comments'] as const;

const router = Route(route => ({
  test: route('test&:tab', {
    component: TestPage,
    params: {
      tab: stringListParser(testTabs),
    },
  }),
}));

Which will result in your parameter being one of the tabs.

Your own parser

The general interface for a ParamParser is:

export interface ParamParser<T> {
  parse: (s: string) => T;
  serialize: (x: T) => string;
}

You can implement your own kind of parser as an example the intParser:

export const intParser: ParamParser<number> = {
  parse: s => parseInt(s),
  serialize: x => x.toString(),
};

Hooks

There are a few complementary Hooks to make your life easier.

useRouteOptions

This is useful whenever you need those global route options of an OptionsRouter. Since you define defaults in the Router those values will never be undefined and always return the correct values for your current route.

const options = { appBar: true };
const router = OptionsRouter(options, route => ({
  home: route('', {
    component: HomePage
  }),
  entry: route('entries/:id', {
    component: EntryPage
    params: {
      id: intParser
    }
  })
}));

const options = useRouteOptions(router);

// or destructured
const { appBar } = useRouteOptions(router);

useRouteParams

This is the way to go when you need those parameters of your Route. Let's say you have the Router from right above.

export const EntryPage = () => {
  // id is statically typed to be a number
  const { id } = useRouteParams(router.entry);

  return <div>Entry {id}</div>;
};

useRouteActive and useRoutesActive

This is the way to go when you need those parameters of your Route. Let's say you have the Router from right above.

const HighlightLink = (
  props: React.PropsWithChildren<{
    to: { $: string };
    isActive: boolean;
  }>
) => {
  const style: React.CSSProperties = { color: 'blue' };
  const activeStyle: React.CSSProperties = { color: 'red' };

  return (
    <Link to={props.to} style={props.isActive ? activeStyle : style}>
      {props.children}
    </Link>
  );
};

export const App = () => {
  // Check if a single route is active
  const active = useRouteActive(router.home);

  // Check if multiple routes are active
  const { home, entry } = useRoutesActive({
    home: router.home,
    entry: router.entry,
  });

  return (
    <ul>
      <li>
        <HighlightLink isActive={home} to={router.home()}>
          Home
        </HighlightLink>
      </li>
      <li>
        <HighlightLink isActive={entry} to={router.entry()}>
          Entry
        </HighlightLink>
      </li>
    </ul>
  );
};

Components

RouterSwitch

This is what you would use instead of the Switch and Route from react-router-dom. You just give it your router and it automatically adds al the routes for you.

<RouterSwitch router={router} />

Link

This is a simple wrapper Component for the react-router-dom Link.

<Link to={router.home()}></Link>

NavLink

This is a simple wrapper Component for the react-router-dom NavLink.

<NavLink to={router.home()}></NavLink>

Redirect

This is a simple wrapper Component for the react-router-dom Redirect.

<Redirect to={router.home()}></Redirect>

Route

This is a simple wrapper Component for the react-router-dom Route.

<Route to={router.home()}></Route>

Roadmap

  • Optional defaults for optional parameters
  • Parsing parent params in a nicer way

Contributing

All contributions are welcome. Please open an issue about your request or bug fix before submitting a pull request.


DevNico

💻 📖

License

This project is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.

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Install

npm i react-typesafe-routes

Weekly Downloads

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Version

2.0.0-alpha.0

License

MIT

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