react-sortablejs
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    6.0.0 • Public • Published

    react-sortablejs

    React bindings to SortableJS

    semantic-release

    Features

    Installation

    sortablejs and @types/sortbalejs are peer dependencies. The latter only used if intellisense/typescript is desired.

    npm install --save react-sortablejs sortablejs
    npm install --save-dev @types/sortablejs
     
    # OR 
    yarn add react-sortablejs sortablejs
    yarn add -D @types/sortablejs

    Learn

    Here is the TLDR of what sortable is:

    - Shopping List: # list of items / sortable. This represents `react-sortablejs`
      - eggs # list item. These are all the items in the list and is what you move around.
      - bread # list item
      - milk # list item

    Usage/Examples

    Function Component

    import React, { FC, useState } from "react";
    import { ReactSortable } from "react-sortablejs";
     
    interface ItemType {
      id: number;
      name: string;
    }
     
    export const BasicFunction: FC = (props) => {
      const [state, setState] = useState<ItemType[]>([
        { id: 1, name: "shrek" },
        { id: 2, name: "fiona" },
      ]);
     
      return (
        <ReactSortable list={state} setList={setState}>
          {state.map((item) => (
            <div key={item.id}>{item.name}</div>
          ))}
        </ReactSortable>
      );
    };

    Class Component

    import React, { Component } from "react";
    import { ReactSortable } from "react-sortablejs";
     
    interface BasicClassState {
      list: { id: string; name: string }[];
    }
     
    export class BasicClass extends Component<{}, BasicClassState> {
      state: BasicClassState = {
        list: [{ id: "1", name: "shrek" }],
      };
      render() {
        return (
          <ReactSortable
            list={this.state.list}
            setList={(newState) => this.setState({ list: newState })}
          >
            {this.state.list.map((item) => (
              <div key={item.id}>{item.name}</div>
            ))}
          </ReactSortable>
        );
      }
    }

    Plugins

    Sortable has some pretty cool plugins such as MultiDrag and Swap.

    By Default:

    • AutoScroll is premounted and enabled.
    • OnSpill is premounted and NOT enabled.
    • MultiDrag and Swap and NOT premounted and NOT enabled

    You must mount mount the plugin with sortable ONCE ONLY.

    import React from "react";
    import { ReactSortable, Sortable, MultiDrag, Swap } from "react-sortablejs";
     
    // mount whatever plugins you'd like to. These are the only current options.
    Sortable.mount(new MultiDrag(), new Swap());
     
    const App = () => {
      const [state, setState] = useState([
        { id: 1, name: "shrek" },
        { id: 2, name: "fiona" },
      ]);
     
      return (
        <ReactSortable
          multiDrag // enables mutidrag
          // OR
          swap // enables swap
        >
          {state.map((item) => (
            <div key={item.id}>{item.name}</div>
          ))}
        </ReactSortable>
      );
    };

    Sortable API

    For a comprehensive list of options, please visit https://github.com/SortableJS/Sortable#options.

    Those options are applied as follows.

    Sortable.create(element, {
      group: " groupName",
      animation: 200,
      delayOnTouchStart: true,
      delay: 2,
    });
     
    // --------------------------
    // Will now be..
    // --------------------------
     
    import React from "react";
    import { ReactSortable } from "react-sortablejs";
     
    const App = () => {
      const [state, setState] = useState([
        { id: 1, name: "shrek" },
        { id: 2, name: "fiona" },
      ]);
     
      return (
        <ReactSortable
          // here they are!
          group="groupName"
          animation={200}
          delayOnTouchStart={true}
          delay={2}
        >
          {state.map((item) => (
            <div key={item.id}>{item.name}</div>
          ))}
        </ReactSortable>
      );
    };

    React API

    id, className, style

    Thes are all defaults DOM attributes. Nothing special here.

    list

    The same as state in const [ state, setState] = useState([{ id: 1}, {id: 2}])

    state must be an array of items, with each item being an object that has the following shape:

      /** The unique id associated with your item. It's recommended this is the same as the key prop for your list item. */
      idstring | number;
      /** When true, the item is selected using MultiDrag */
      selected?: boolean;
      /** When true, the item is deemed "chosen", which basically just a mousedown event. */
      chosen?: boolean;
      /** When true, it will not be possible to pick this item up in the list. */
      filtered?: boolean;
      [propertystring]any;

    setList

    The same as setState in const [ state, setState] = useState([{ id: 1}, {id: 2}])

    clone

    If you're using {group: { name: 'groupName', pull: 'clone'}}, this means your in 'clone' mode. You should provide a function for this.

    Check out the source code of the clone example for more information. I'll write it here soon.

    tag

    ReactSortable is a div element by default. This can be changed to be any HTML element (for example ul, ol) or can be a React component.

    This value, be the component or the HTML element should be passed down under props.tag.

    Let's explore both here.

    HTML Element

    Here we will use a ul. You can use any HTML. Just add the string and ReactSortable will use a li instead of a div.

    import React, { FC, useState } from "react";
    import { ReactSortable } from "react-sortablejs";
     
    export const BasicFunction: FC = (props) => {
      const [state, setState] = useState([{ id: "1", name: "shrek" }]);
     
      return (
        <ReactSortable tag="ul" list={state} setList={setState}>
          {state.map((item) => (
            <li key={item.id}>{item.name}</li>
          ))}
        </ReactSortable>
      );
    };

    Custom Component

    When using a custom component in the tag prop, the only component it allows is a forwardRef component. Currently we only support components who use the React.forwardRef API.

    If it doesn't have one, you can add one using React.forwardRef().

    todo: Some third party UI components may have nested elements to create the look they're after. This could be an issue and not sure how to fix.

    import React, { FC, useState, forwardRef } from "react";
    import { ReactSortable } from "react-sortablejs";
     
    // This is just like a normal component, but now has a ref.
    const CustomComponent = forwardRef<HTMLDivElement, any>((props, ref) => {
      return <div ref={ref}>{props.children}</div>;
    });
     
    export const BasicFunction: FC = (props) => {
      const [state, setState] = useState([
        { id: 1, name: "shrek" },
        { id: 2, name: "fiona" },
      ]);
     
      return (
        <ReactSortable tag={CustomComponent} list={state} setList={setState}>
          {state.map((item) => (
            <div key={item.id}>{item.name}</div>
          ))}
        </ReactSortable>
      );
    };

    How does it work?

    Sortable affects the DOM, adding, and removing nodes/css when it needs to in order to achieve the smooth transitions we all know an love. This component reverses many of it's actions of the DOM so React can handle this when the state changes.

    Caveats / Gotchas

    key !== index

    DO NOT use the index as a key for your list items. Sorting will not work.

    In all the examples above, I used an object with an ID. You should do the same!

    I may even enforce this into the design to eliminate errors.

    Nesting

    Problem

    Basically the child updates the state twice. I'm working on this.

    What does work?

    Our usage indicates that as long as we only move items between lists that don't use the same setState function.

    I hope to provide an example soon.

    Solutions

    We don't have anything that works 100%, but here I'd like to spit ball some potential avenues to look down.

    • Use onMove to handle state changes instead of onAdd,onRemove, etc.
    • Create a Sortable plugin specifically for react-sortbalejs

    Keywords

    none

    Install

    npm i react-sortablejs

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    89,265

    Version

    6.0.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    60.4 kB

    Total Files

    8

    Last publish

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