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    react-s-alert-khardenstine

    1.3.1 • Public • Published

    React sAlert component

    sAlert is a React component which provides alerts or notifications with rich configuration possibilities. This is a rewritten version of Meteor/Blaze sAlert package which you can find here: s-alert.meteor.com.

    Demo

    The demo website and provided source code are the best learning resources.

    Usage with React

    Here is what you need to do to make it work. Of course you need to have React and ReactDOM installed in your project.

    1. Install the package

    npm install react-s-alert --save
    

    2. Import component

    With ES2015:

    import Alert from 'react-s-alert';
    

    With ES5:

    var Alert = require('react-s-alert').default;
    

    3. Import (or copy) CSS files

    All you need to do is to import (or copy) a default CSS file and some or all CSS files with effects which you want to use. A default CSS file is mandatory. With Webpack you could do something like:

    With ES2015:

    // mandatory
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-default.css';
     
    // optional - you can choose the effect you want
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/slide.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/scale.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/bouncyflip.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/flip.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/genie.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/jelly.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/stackslide.css';

    With ES5:

    // mandatory
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-default.css');
     
    // optional - you can choose the effect you want
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/slide.css');
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/scale.css');
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/bouncyflip.css');
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/flip.css');
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/genie.css');
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/jelly.css');
    require('react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/stackslide.css');

    You can also copy the files and include it another way in your app. It depends on your workflow.

    If you are using CSS Modules for now you need to import these files globally. (You can check the demo website Webpack config file).

    4. Place sAlert component in you main app component

    You need to place the main sAlert container. The best place for it is at the end of your main app component. For Example:

    import React from 'react';
    import {Router} from 'react-router';
    import Alert from 'react-s-alert';
     
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-default.css';
    import 'react-s-alert/dist/s-alert-css-effects/slide.css';
     
    class Main extends React.Component {
        constructor(props) {
            super(props);
        }
        render() {
            return (
                <div>
                    <span>
                        {this.props.children}
                    </span>
                    <Alert stack={{limit: 3}} />
                </div>
            )
        }
    }
     
    export default Main;

    5. Make calls to activate alerts

    You can activate your alerts in many different places in the app. You need to call proper methods. For Example:

    Methods which you can use:

    • Alert.warning(message, configObj)
    • Alert.error(message, configObj)
    • Alert.info(message, configObj)
    • Alert.success(message, configObj)
    • Alert.close(alertId)
    • Alert.closeAll()

    sAlert methods will return the already created alertId.

    Example usage:

    import React from 'react';
    import Alert from 'react-s-alert';
     
    class Home extends React.Component {
        handleClick1(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            Alert.warning('<h1>Test message 1</h1>', {
                position: 'top-right',
                effect: 'scale',
                onShow: function () {
                    console.log('aye!')
                },
                beep: false,
                timeout: 'none',
                offset: 100
            });
        }
        handleClick2(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            Alert.info('Test message 2', {
                position: 'bottom-left',
                effect: 'bouncyflip',
                timeout: 'none'
            });
        }
        handleClick3(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            Alert.error('Test message 3', {
                position: 'bottom-right',
                effect: 'slide',
                timeout: 'none'
            });
        }
        handleCloseAll(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            Alert.closeAll();
        }
        render() {
            return (
                <div>
                    <div>
                        <a href="#" onClick={this.handleClick1}>Click 1</a> |
                        <a href="#" onClick={this.handleClick2}>Click 2</a> |
                        <a href="#" onClick={this.handleClick3}>Click 3</a> |
                        <a href="#" onClick={this.handleCloseAll}>Close All</a>
                    </div>
                </div>
            )
        }
    }
     
    export default Home;

    You always need to provide a message. For example

    Alert.error('Test message 3');

    You can also provide a react component:

    Alert.error(<MyComponent props1={props1} props2={props2}/>);

    You don't need to provide the configuration object here, just remember to provide it globally.

    Configuration details

    With sAlert you can place your configuration as a global config in the main sAlert container, for example:

    <Alert stack={{limit: 3}} html={true} />

    You can also overwrite these global settings in the particular method call. For example, here we will overwrite the global settings for 'html' in our error alert call:

    Alert.error('Error message...', {
        position: 'bottom-right',
        effect: 'slide',
        html: false
    });

    All possible configuration options:

    First - only global configuration options

    You can set it up only in the main sAlert component props

    1. stack

    You can stack your alerts or just display them in the same place.

    Possible stack values:

    • true or false
    • object with:
      • limit (you can limit your alerts displayed on screen)
      • spacing (you can change the space around your alerts)

    Examples:

    <Alert stack={{limit: 3, spacing: 50}} />

    or

    <Alert stack={true} />
    2. contentTemplate

    You can prepare your own content template even with additional fields (More details can be found later on in this README.)

    Examples:

    <Alert contentTemplate={MyContentTemplate} />

    Here you can also use all configuration options listed below.

    Configuration options with a single sAlert method call

    1. effect

    You can provide the name of the animations effect, you also need to import proper CSS file.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        effect: 'genie'
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert effect='genie' />

    Possible effects names:

    • slide
    • scale
    • bouncyflip
    • flip
    • genie
    • jelly
    • stackslide

    Remember that you need to import the CSS files for the effects. See above.

    2. position

    Where the alert should appear.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        position: 'top-right'
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert position='top-right' />

    Possible positions:

    • top (full width)
    • bottom (full width)
    • top-right
    • top-left
    • bottom-right
    • bottom-left
    3. timeout

    You can set up the timeout in ms.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        timeout: 5000
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert timeout={5000} />

    Possible timeout values:

    • (Number - ms)
    • 'none'
    4. html

    You can configure if your alert should display HTML formated messages.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('<h1>Message...</h1>', {
        html: true
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert html={true} />

    Possible 'html' values:

    • true
    • false
    5. offset

    In px. Will be added to first alert (bottom or top - depends on the position in config).

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        offset: 150
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert offset={150} />

    Possible offset values:

    • (Number - px)
    6. beep

    You can set up your audio 'beeps'. Just configure your audio file path. (.mp3 files should work in every browser.) You can also configure 4 paths for 4 conditions.

    There is no default audio sample in the package. You should use sound samples which you know that you have the right to use it.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        beep: '/path-to-audio/file.mp3'
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert beep={{
        info: '/path-to-audio/file-info.mp3',
        error: '/path-to-audio/file-error.mp3',
        warning: '/path-to-audio/file-warning.mp3',
        success: '/path-to-audio/file-success.mp3'}} />

    or just one for all:

    <Alert beep='/path-to-audio/file.mp3' />

    Possible 'beep' values:

    • (String - audio file path) (one audio file for all alerts)
    • (Object)
      • {info: '/path/file.mp3', error: '/path/file.mp3', warning: '/path/file.mp3', success: '/path/file.mp3'}
    7. onShow

    Execute a callback function. onShow will fire the function when the alert appears.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        onShow: function () {
            console.log('onShow Fired!');
        }
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert onShow={this.handleOnShow} />

    Possible 'onShow' values:

    • (Function)
    8. onClose

    Execute a callback function. Will fire the function when the alert is closed.

    Example:

    In method call:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        onClose: function () {
            console.log('onClose Fired!');
        }
    });

    In global config:

    <Alert onClose={this.handleOnClose} />

    Possible 'onClose' values:

    • (Function)
    9. customFields

    You can pass a customFields object for your custom content template component. You need to prepare the component to be able to display customFields values. You'll read more about it below.

    Example:

    In global config you need to provide custom content template component:

    <Alert contentTemplate={MyContentTemplate} />

    In method call you can provide custom fields used in your custom template:

    Alert.success('Message...', {
        customFields: {
            specialInfo: this.getSpecialInfo();
        }
    });

    Possible 'customFields' values:

    • (Object)

    Overwrite content template component

    With sAlert you have the possibility to overwrite the SAlertContentTmpl core component. This is useful when you want to provide more dynamic data in your alerts or just when you want to rebuild the HTML structure of the alert. This is very useful, but might not be trivial. Standard sAlerts will take only the message you want to display and some configuration. There will be use cases when you want to display some more dynamic data or just some more HTML structures.

    I'll try to explain it by example:

    Let's say that we want to have an alert with the additional dynamic data. We want the name of the customer, and a confirmation button which will close the alert.

    Here is what we could do.

    In our main app component we will use sAlert component (see above) with a custom content component:

    import MyCustomContentTemplate from './MyCustomContentTemplate';
    (...)
    <Alert contentTemplate={MyCustomContentTemplate} />
    (...)

    We have just told our sAlert component that we will use a custom content component instead the core one which is called SAlertContentTmpl. (You should copy the content of the SAlertContentTmpl in your custom one and add your own modifications to it).

    For example our MyCustomContentTemplate component could look like:

    import React from 'react';
    import Alert from 'react-s-alert';
     
    class MyCustomContentTemplate extends React.Component {
        constructor(props) {
            super(props);
        }
        handleConfirm() {
            console.log('Customer confirmation!');
            Alert.close(this.props.id);
        }
        render() {
            return (
                <div className={this.props.classNames} id={this.props.id} style={this.props.styles}>
                    <div className='s-alert-box-inner'>
                        {this.props.message}
                    </div>
                    <h3>{this.props.customFields.customerName}</h3>
                    <button onClick={this.handleConfirm.bind(this)}>Confirm</button>
                    <span className='s-alert-close' onClick={this.props.handleClose}></span>
                </div>
            )
        }
    }
     
    export default MyCustomContentTemplate;

    Then you just need to pass the customerName value somewhere in your app. For example:

    Alert.warning('Customer confirmation needed.', {
        customFields: {
            customerName: 'Stefan Kowalski'
        }
    });
    

    As you can see you should keep the other props here. These are the props which are needed to provide proper behaviour of your alerts. You need to be careful with custom content components.

    Testing and Development

    Clone and install it first:

    git clone https://github.com/juliancwirko/react-s-alert.git
    cd react-s-alert
    npm install
    

    If you want to test (Node.js 4.0 or newer):

    npm test
    

    or

    npm run testonly
    

    If you want to transpile from ES2015 to ES5:

    npm run prepublish
    

    Also check out

    License

    MIT

    Install

    npm i react-s-alert-khardenstine

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    53

    Version

    1.3.1

    License

    MIT

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • khardenstine