Neighborly Package Megalodon

    react-interop

    0.3.0 • Public • Published

    react-interop

    Interop layer for consuming React components with other JavaScript libraries.

    Do you want to render React components into a legacy application that uses a different framework? Do you want your legacy code to be ignorant of the fact that React is being used?

    Are you delivering a component for someone else to render in their application? Do you need your component to work regardless of the framework their application is built in?

    react-interop enables these scenarios by delivering your components in an API that can be used by virtually any other JavaScript framework.

    Demo

    This repository includes a basic Stock Ticker style demo. To run the demo:

    npm install
    npm run demo

    This demo will open a static HTML page demonstrates embedding exported components in a consuming application. This is a vanilla HTML page that consumes components exported through react-interop.

    Exporting Components

    Exporting React components through react-interop makes them available for legacy or third-party integration. To export them, create a webpack entry point to produce a JavaScript bundle to be referenced by the consumer (legacy or third-party). The entry point will have code like the following.

    // Run webpack over this entry point to produce a JS file
    // that provides the exported components via react-interop
    // For this example, output would be 'stockticker.js'
     
    import {exportComponents} from 'react-interop';
    import React from 'react';
     
    // StockPrice is a sample React component that we want to export
    const StockPrice = ({symbol, price}) => (
        <div>
            <strong>{symbol}</strong>: {price.toFixed(2)}
        </div>
    );
     
    // exportComponents provides an API over all specified components
    // that allows them to be rendered either as static markup or
    // with live React rendering
    const exported = exportComponents({
        StockPrice
    });
     
    // The exported components can be made available globally
    // for consumers to reference
    window.StockTicker = exported;

    Consuming Exported Components as HTML (Static Markup)

    Exported components integrate into legacy or third-party applications using vanilla JavaScript to get the HTML of the rendered components.

    <script src="stockticker.js"></script>
    <script>
     
        var stockHTML = window.StockTicker.StockPrice.renderToStaticMarkup({
            symbol: 'SAP',
            price: 104
        });
     
    </script> 

    Consuming Exported Components for Live Rendering

    Exported components also provide live rendering for "durable" containers where the component becomes the owner of the container element.

    <!-- The DIV that the display name component will be rendered into -->
    <div id="stockprice-sap"></div>
     
    <script src="stockticker.js"></script>
    <script>
     
        window.StockTicker.StockPrice.render(
            {symbol: 'SAP', price: 104},
            // Supply either an element or and element id string
            // (for document.getElementById to be used by default)
            document.getElementById('stockprice-sap')
        );
     
    </script> 

    Backing Components with redux

    react-interop also supports backing components with redux or other container components to enable state-driven components. This works with both static markup and live rendering.

    To accomplish this, the webpack entry point will create the redux store, and pass the Provider component and its props to exportComponents.

    // Run webpack over this entry point to produce a JS file
    // that provides the exported components via react-interop
    // For this example, output would be 'stockticker.js'
     
    import {createStore} from 'redux';
    import {exportComponents} from 'react-interop';
    import React from 'react';
    import {connect, Provider} from 'react-redux';
     
    function reducer(state = {}, action) {
        switch (action.type) {
            case 'SET_STOCK_PRICE':
                const {price, symbol} = action;
     
                return {
                    ...state,
                    [symbol]: price
                };
     
            default:
                return state;
        }
    }
     
    // StockPrice is a sample React component that we want to export
    // symbol comes from props, price come from state
    const StockPrice = ({symbol, price}) => (
        <div>
            <strong>{symbol}</strong>: {price.toFixed(2)}
        </div>
    );
     
    const mapStateToProps = (state, {symbol}) => ({
        symbol,
        price: state[symbol]
    });
     
    const ConnectedStockPrice = connect(mapStateToProps)(StockPrice);
     
    const store = createStore(reducer, {SAP: 104});
     
    // The second parameter is the container type that every
    // component instance should be rendered within.
    // The third parameter is an object that represents the
    // props to provide to the container elements themselves
    // In this example, we supply react-redux Provider and
    // the store instance to be used for every Provider
    const exported = exportComponents(
        {
            StockPrice: ConnectedStockPrice
        },
        Provider,
        {store}
    );
     
    // The exported components can be made available globally
    // for consumers to reference
    window.StockTicker = exported;

    Consumers of exported components do not need to do anything differently when the components are wrapped in a container. But in this example, the consumer can now render a StockPrice using only the symbol and the price will be pulled from the store.

    <!-- The DIV that the display name component will be rendered into -->
    <div id="stockprice-sap"></div>
     
    <script src="stockticker.js"></script>
    <script>
     
        window.StockTicker.StockPrice.render({symbol: 'SAP'}, 'stockprice-sap');
     
    </script> 

    Note that react-interop does not depend on redux or react-redux. You can use any container element to wrap around exported components.

    Exporting Redux Action Creators

    Alongside React components, you can also use a small bit of code to export action creators to the consuming application. This relies on redux's bindActionCreators function to expose pure JavaScript functions that will dispatch actions on the store.

    Nothing is needed beyond bindActionCreators and a simple convention, so there are not any helpers from react-interop involved in exporting action creators.

    // Run webpack over this entry point to produce a JS file
    // that provides the exported components via react-interop
    // For this example, output would be 'stockticker.js'
     
    import {createStore} from 'redux';
    import {exportComponents} from 'react-interop';
    import React from 'react';
    import {connect, Provider} from 'react-redux';
     
    function reducer(state = {}, action) {
        switch (action.type) {
            case 'SET_STOCK_PRICE':
                const {price, symbol} = action;
     
                return {
                    ...state,
                    [symbol]: price
                };
     
            default:
                return state;
        }
    }
     
    function setStockPrice(symbol, price) {
        return {
            type: 'SET_STOCK_PRICE',
            symbol,
            price
        };
    }
     
    const StockPrice = ({symbol, price}) => (
        <div>
            <strong>{symbol}</strong>: {price.toFixed(2)}
        </div>
    );
     
    const mapStateToProps = (state, {symbol}) => ({
        symbol,
        price: state[symbol]
    });
     
    const ConnectedStockPrice = connect(mapStateToProps)(StockPrice);
     
    const store = createStore(reducer, {SAP: 104});
     
    const exported = exportComponents(
        {
            StockPrice: ConnectedStockPrice
        },
        Provider,
        {store}
    );
     
    // Use bindActionCreators to be ready to export the action creators
    const exportedActions = bindActionCreators({setStockPrice}, store.dispatch);
     
    // The exported components and actions can be made
    // available globally for consumers to reference
    window.StockTicker = {
        ...exportedComponents,
        ...exportedActions
    };

    With this approach, consumers can now invoke vanilla JavaScript functions that will dispatch redux actions, update the store, and cause any exported components rendered through the render method to update. Subsequent calls to renderToStaticMarkup will also respect store updates.

    <!-- The DIV that the display name component will be rendered into -->
    <div id="stockprice-sap"></div>
     
    <script src="stockticker.js"></script>
    <script>
     
        window.StockTicker.StockPrice.render({symbol: 'SAP'}, 'stockprice-sap');
     
        // This results in dispatching the setStockPrice action
        // and the store will be updated with {SAP: 105}.
        // Because live rendering is used, the rendered stock
        // price will automatically be re-rendered.
        window.StockTicker.setStockPrice('SAP', 105);
     
    </script> 

    Note that react-interop does not depend on redux. This same approach can be used with other state management implementations.

    Making Callbacks to Consumers

    If the consumer uses the renderToStaticMarkup rendering approach, there may be times when you need to invoke a callback to inform the consuming application that components need to be re-rendered or that other notable events have occurred.

    To fulfill this requirement, react-interop supplies a pub/sub model based on redux's subscribe implementation. The webpack entry point will define callbacks that the consumer can subscribe to.

    // Run webpack over this entry point to produce a JS file
    // that provides the exported components via react-interop
    // For this example, output would be 'stockticker.js'
     
    import React from 'react';
    import {connect, Provider} from 'react-redux';
    import {applyMiddleware, bindActionCreators, createStore} from 'redux';
    import {createCallback, exportCallbacks, exportComponents} from '../src';
     
    function applyFluctuation(stocks) {
        const newStocks = {};
     
        Object.keys(stocks).forEach((symbol) => {
            // Apply a fluctuation of +/- 10%
            const fluctuation = (Math.random() - 0.5) * 0.1;
     
            newStocks[symbol] = stocks[symbol] + (stocks[symbol] * fluctuation);
        });
     
        return newStocks;
    }
     
    function reducer(state = {}, action) {
        switch (action.type) {
            case 'SET_STOCK_PRICE':
                const {price, symbol} = action;
     
                return {
                    ...state,
                    [symbol]: price
                };
     
            case 'FLUCTUATE_STOCKS':
                return applyFluctuation(state);
     
            default:
                return state;
        }
    }
     
    function setStockPrice(symbol, price) {
        return {
            type: 'SET_STOCK_PRICE',
            symbol,
            price
        };
    }
     
    function fluctuateStockPrices() {
        return {
            type: 'FLUCTUATE_STOCKS'
        };
    }
     
    const StockPrice = ({symbol, price}) => (
        <div>
            <strong>{symbol}</strong>: {price.toFixed(2)}
        </div>
    );
     
    const mapStateToProps = (state, {symbol}) => ({
        symbol,
        price: state[symbol]
    });
     
    const ConnectedStockPrice = connect(mapStateToProps)(StockPrice);
     
    // Create a callback pub/sub instance
    const onPriceChanged = createCallback();
     
    // Using redux middleware, watch for price changes
    // and notify subscribers that a price was changed
    const priceChangeMiddleware = store => next => action => {
        const oldPrices = store.getState();
     
        next(action);
     
        const newPrices = store.getState();
     
        Object.keys(newPrices).forEach((symbol) => {
            if (newPrices[symbol] !== oldPrices[symbol]) {
                onPriceChanged.dispatch({
                    symbol,
                    price: newPrices[symbol]
                });
            }
        });
    };
     
    const store = createStore(
        reducer,
        {SAP: 104},
        applyMiddleware(priceChangeMiddleware)
    );
     
    // Fluctuate stock prices every 5 seconds
    function dispatchFluctuation() {
        store.dispatch(fluctuateStockPrices());
    }
     
    window.setInterval(dispatchFluctuation, 5000);
     
    // Generate the exported components
    const exportedComponents = exportComponents(
        {
            StockPrice: ConnectedStockPrice
        },
        Provider,
        {store}
    );
     
    // Use bindActionCreators to be ready to export the action creators
    const exportedActions = bindActionCreators({setStockPrice}, store.dispatch);
     
    // Generate the exported callbacks
    const exportedCallbacks = exportCallbacks({onPriceChanged});
     
    // The exported components, actions, and callbacks can
    // be made available globally for consumers to reference
    window.StockTicker = {
        ...exportedComponents,
        ...exportedActions,
        ...exportedCallbacks
    };

    With the onPriceChanged callback exported, consumers can now subscribe and receive the callback parameters.

    <!-- The DIV that the display name component will be rendered into -->
    <div id="stockprice-sap"></div>
     
    <script src="stockticker.js"></script>
    <script>
     
        function renderSAPStockPrice() {
            var stockHTML = window.StockTicker.StockPrice.renderToStaticMarkup(
                {symbol: 'SAP'}
            );
     
            document.getElementById('stockprice-sap').innerHTML = stockHTML;
        }
     
        // When the StockTicker notifies that a price has changed,
        // log a status message and re-render the SAP stock price
        // if it was the price that changed
        function notifyOnStockChange(stock) {
            console.log('A stock price changed', stock.symbol, stock.price);
     
            if (stock.symbol === 'SAP') {
                renderSAPStockPrice();
            }
        }
     
        renderSAPStockPrice();
     
        // The corresponding unsubscribe function is returned
        var unsubscribe = window.StockTicker.onPriceChanged(notifyOnStockChange);
     
    </script> 

    Note that react-interop does not depend on redux. These callbacks can be used for any scenario where the consuming application needs to be notified.

    Wrap-Up

    react-interop provides exportComponents and exportCallbacks utilities to make it easy to provide an interop layer over your React components. This interop layer allows your components to be rendered in legacy application or third-party applications where React might not be in direct use. Consumers use vanilla JavaScript functions to render components, invoke actions, and subscribe to callbacks.

    The two rendering scenarios are:

    1. render components into "durable" containers (where the component then becomes the owner of the container)
    2. renderToStaticMarkup gets the static HTML markup from components for rendering controlled by the consumer

    react-interop prescribes the use of redux's bindActionCreators (or analogous methods from other flux implementations) to expose functions for invoking actions without the consuming being aware of the flux implementation.

    Using exportCallbacks (along with createCallback), consumers subscribe to events and receive vanilla JavaScript callbacks with parameters.

    To provide your components to the consumer, create a webpack entry point that constructs your store and exports your components, actions, and callbacks. Your consumers will reference your bundle as a vanilla JavaScript file.

    Install

    npm i react-interop

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    3

    Version

    0.3.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    25.3 kB

    Total Files

    8

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • concur