push-it-to-the-limit
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2.0.1 • Public • Published

Push it to the limit

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Delay wrappers for common purposes. Fast and simple with promises.

Main features

  • Promise as a result
  • Lodash-compatible API
  • Interrelated delays support

Install

    npm i push-it-to-the-limit
    yarn add push-it-to-the-limit

API

The interface is dumb: each wrapper gets at least one argument — target function. The second param is opt, which may be a numeric delay or a IWrapperOpts object. Also the scheme with three arguments is supported as in lodash. Wrapper returns IControlled function: it's a functor with a pair exposed util methods: cancel and flush.

  • flush() immediately invokes the target fn.
  • cancel() clears any bounded timeout.

IDelay

Basic delay is a rate limit — 1 request per n ms. Sometimes you may face with more complex restriction like "10 req per 100ms" and, you know, this is not the same as "1 req per 10ms". Moreover, "10 requests per second and 200 requests per minute" also occurs. The last case is interrelated delay.

// basic numeric delay
  const d1 = 100
  
// complex delay
  const d2 = {period: 1000, count: 10}
  
// interrelated delay
  const d3 = [{period: 1000, count: 10}, {period: 60000, count: 200}]

// mixed case
  const d4 = [1000, {period: 60000, count: 20}]

Usage examples

delay

Each function call is delayed for a specified time.

    import {delay} from 'push-it-to-the-limit'

    const delayedLog = delay(console.log, 10000)
    
    delayedLog('foo')
    delayedLog('bar')
    
    // ~10 second later in stdout
    // foo
    // bar

Wrapped function always returns a Promise, so you are're able to use await or then()

    const delayed = delay(() => 'bar', 100)
    const foo = await delayed() // 'bar'

throttle

Returns the function that invokes origin fn at most once per a period.

    import {throttle} from 'push-it-to-the-limit'
    const throttled = throttle(v => v, 100)

    throttled('foo')  // 'foo'
    throttled('bar')  // 'foo'

    // 100 ms later
    throttled('baz')  // 'baz'

debounce

debounce groups multiple sequential calls in a single one with the last passed args.

    import {debounce} from 'push-it-to-the-limit'
    const debounced = debounce(v => v, 1)
    const [foo, bar] = await Promise.all([debounced('baz'), debounced('qux')])
        
    foo === 'qux' // true
    foo === bar   // true

ratelimit

ratelimit confines the execution frequency of target function. Overlimited invocations are being delayed until the limit reset. Have a look at this ratelimit implementation. That's good enough except the only thing: generating timeout for each invocation looks redundant.

    import {ratelimit} from 'push-it-to-the-limit'

    const period = 100
    const count = 2
    const start = Date.now()
    const fn = ratelimit(x => {
      console.log('%s ms - %s', Date.now() - start, x)
    }, {period, count})

    for (let y = 0; y < 10; y++) {
      fn(y)
    }

/** stdout
    1 ms - 0
    14 ms - 1
    103 ms - 2
    105 ms - 3
    204 ms - 4
    206 ms - 5
    305 ms - 6
    310 ms - 7
    411 ms - 8
    412 ms - 9
 */

ratelimit supports interrelated delays. So you're able to set complex restrictions like:

    [{period: 1000, count: 10}, {period: 60000, count: 200}]

It's 10 requests per second and 200 requests per minute. You can also share the same limit across several functions.

const l1 = new Limiter([{ period: 10, count: 4 }])
const l2 = new Limiter([{ period: 50, count: 5 }, l1])

const throttled1 = throttle(fn1, {limiter: l2})
const throttled2 = throttle(fn2, {limiter: l1})
const throttled3 = throttle(fn3, {limiter: l1})

stabilize

— Why not just use debounce?
— Debounced fn awaits some time before it invokes the origin function, so if ..., target fn would never been called.
— But here's ratelimit, isn't it?
— Ratelimit "expands" the calls timeline to match frequency limit.
— ...
— This wrapper swaps some calls like throttle, but guarantees that target fn would be called at least every n ms.
— Still looks similar to Lodash debounce with maxDelay opt.
— Yes. But this one returns a Promise.
— Why just not...
— Ok. It's a shortcut for debounce with maxDelay opt, that equals delay.
— And how about this: throttle(fn, {delay: 100, maxWait: 100, leading: false, trailing: true})?
throttle is a special case of debounce
— ...
Actually everything is debounce.

    const fn = v => v
    const stable = stabilize(fn, 100)

    for (let y = 0; y < 10; y++) {
      (x => setTimeout(() => {
        const start = Date.now()
    
        stable(x)
          .then(v => console.log('x=', x, 'value=', v, 'delay=', (Date.now() - start)))
        }, x * 20 )
      )(y)
    }
 
 /** stdout
    x= 0 value= 5 delay= 103
    x= 1 value= 5 delay= 94
    x= 2 value= 5 delay= 72
    x= 3 value= 5 delay= 58
    x= 4 value= 5 delay= 35
    x= 5 value= 5 delay= 19
    x= 6 value= 9 delay= 103
    x= 7 value= 9 delay= 85
    x= 8 value= 9 delay= 66
    x= 9 value= 9 delay= 48
  */

repeat

Repeater makes a function to be autocallable. It stores the last call params and uses them for further invocations.

    import {repeat} from 'push-it-to-the-limit'
    
    function fn (step) { this.i += step }
    const context = { i: 0 }
    const delay = 1000
    const rep = repeater(fn, delay, context)
    
    rep(2)
    
    // Imagine, 5 seconds later new 'manual' call occurs
    setTimeout(() => rep(1), 5000)

    // ~10 seconds after start: 
    setTimeout(() => console.log(context.i), 10000) // 15

Notes and refs

License

MIT

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Install

npm i push-it-to-the-limit

Weekly Downloads

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Version

2.0.1

License

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  • antongolub
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