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ngx-permissions

6.0.4 • Public • Published

ngx-permissions

Permission and roles based access control for your angular(angular 2,4,5,6,7+) applications(AOT, lazy modules compatible)

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Documentation and examples

To see better structured documentation go to wiki-page.
In one month the detailed functionality description will be available only on wiki page.

Demo

You can test library in Plunker

Table of contents

Some functionality is missing visit wiki-page

With version 5 minimal rxjs dependency 6.0

With version 4 minimal rxjs dependency 5.5

Version 2 for angular 4/5. Version 1 for angular 2/4

Installation

To install this library, run:

$ npm install ngx-permissions --save

Consuming library

You can import library in any Angular application by running:

$ npm install ngx-permissions  --save

and then from your Angular AppModule:

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
 
import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
 
// Import your library
import { NgxPermissionsModule } from 'ngx-permissions';
 
@NgModule({
  declarations: [
    AppComponent
  ],
  imports: [
    BrowserModule,
 
    // Specify your library as an import
     NgxPermissionsModule.forRoot()
  ],
  providers: [],
  bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

SharedModule

If you use a SharedModule that you import in multiple other feature modules, you can export the NgxPermissionsModule to make sure you don't have to import it in every module.

@NgModule({
    exports: [
        CommonModule,
        NgxPermissionsModule
    ]
})
export class SharedModule { }

Note: Never call a forRoot static method in the SharedModule. You might end up with different instances of the service in your injector tree. But you can use forChild if necessary.

Lazy loaded modules

When you lazy load a module, you should use the forChild static method to import the NgxPermissionsModule.

Since lazy loaded modules use a different injector from the rest of your application, you can configure them separately. You can also isolate the service by using permissionsIsolate: true or rolesIsolate: true. In which case the service is a completely isolated instance. Otherwise, by default, it will share its data with other instances of the service.

@NgModule({
    imports: [
        NgxPermissionsModule.forChild()
    ]
})
export class LazyLoadedModule { }
@NgModule({
    imports: [
        NgxPermissionsModule.forChild({
        permissionsIsolate: true, 
        rolesIsolate: true})
    ]
})
export class LazyIsolatedLoadedModule { }

Once your library is imported, you can use its components, directives and pipes in your Angular application:

Import service to the main application and load permissions

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { NgxPermissionsService } from 'ngx-permissions';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';
@Component({
  selector: 'app-root',
  templateUrl: './app.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})
export class AppComponent implements OnInit {
 
  title = 'app';
 
   constructor(private permissionsService: NgxPermissionsService,
               private http: HttpClient) {}
 
  ngOnInit(): void {
    const perm = ["ADMIN", "EDITOR"];
 
    this.permissionsService.loadPermissions(perm);
    
     this.http.get('url').subscribe((permissions) => {
       //const perm = ["ADMIN", "EDITOR"]; example of permissions
       this.permissionsService.loadPermissions(permissions);
    })
  }
}

Usage in templates

<div *ngxPermissionsOnly="['ADMIN', 'GUEST']">
    <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
</div>
 
<ng-template ngxPermissionsOnly="ADMIN">
  <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
 </ng-template>
 
 <ng-template [ngxPermissionsExcept]="['JOHNY']">
   <div> All will see it except JOHNY</div>
 </ng-template>

Managing permissions

Overview

  1. Introduction
  2. Defining permissions
  3. Individual permissions
  4. To load permissions before application start up
  5. Multiple permissions
  6. Removing permissions
  7. Retrieving permissions

Introduction

Let's start with little explanation what permission is. Permission is the most atomic ability that a user can have in your application. So you can think about permission as a smallest action that user can do inside your site.

But can user or anonymous be a permission? Technically yes, but from business point of view you should treat them as Roles that are more complex objects that can store more complex logic.

💡 Note
It's a good convention to start permission with a verb and combine them with resource or object, so permissions like readDocuments or listSongs are meaningful and easy to understand for other programmes. Notice that they are named lowerCamelCase for easy differentiation form roles.

💀 Warning
This library is intended for simplify the client side development workflow in a role based web application. DO NOT RELY ONLY ON THIS CHECKS FOR YOU APPLICATION SECURITY! Client side checks can be easily bypassed, so always implement the checks on the backend!

Defining permissions

So, how do you tell Permission what does 'readDocuments' or 'listSongs' mean and how to know if the current user belongs to those definitions?

Well, Permission allows you to set different 'permissions' definitions along with the logic that determines if the current session belongs to them. To do that library exposes special container NgxPermissionsService that allows you to manipulate them freely.

Individual permissions

To add permissions individually NgxPermissionsService exposes method addPermission that generic usage is shown below or add as array:

[...]
 ngOnInit() {
    this.permissionsService.addPermission('changeSomething')
    this.permissionsService.addPermission(['changeSomething', 'anotherAlso'])
    this.permissionsService.addPermission('changeSomething', () => {
        return true;
    })
     
    this.permissionsService.addPermission('anotherPermissions', (permissionName, permissionsObject) => {
        return !!permissionsObject[permissionName];
    });
    this.permissionsService.addPermission(['anotherPermissions', 'AnotherOne'], (permissionName, permissionsObject) => {
        return !!permissionsObject[permissionName];
    });
     
    //Will add validation function to every permission
     this.permissionsService.addPermission(['anotherPermissions', 'AnotherOne'], (permissionName, permissionsObject) => {
         return !!permissionsObject[permissionName];
     });
     
     this.permissionsService.addPermission('permissions', (permissionName, permissionsObject) => {
       return this.checkSession().toPromise();
     });
 }
 

To load permissions before application start up

APP_INITIALIZER is defined in angular/core. You include it in your app.module.ts like this.

APP_INITIALIZER is an OpaqueToken that references the ApplicationInitStatus service. ApplicationInitStatus is a multi provider. It supports multiple dependencies and you can use it in your providers list multiple times. It is used like this.

import { APP_INITIALIZER } from '@angular/core';
 
@NgModule({
  providers: [
    DictionaryService,
    {
      provide: APP_INITIALIZER,
      useFactory: (ds: DictionaryService, ps: NgxPermissionsService ) => function() {return ds.load().then((data) => {return ps.loadPermissions(data)})},
      deps: [LoadService, NgxPermissionsService],
      multi: true
    }]
})
export class AppModule { }

Validation function are injected with any angular services. There are 2 local injectables available that can be used to implement more complex validation logic.

Injectable Local Description
permissionName String representing name of checked permission
permissionsObject Object of store permissions storing permissions properties

It also have to return one of values to properly represent results:

Validation result Returned value
Valid [true|Promise.resolve() but it should not resolve false]
Invalid [false|Promise.reject() or Promise.resolve(false)]

Multiple permissions

To define multiple permissions method loadPermissions can be used. The only difference from definePermission is that it accepts Array of permission names instead of single one.

Often meet example of usage is set of permissions (e.g. received from server after user login) that you will iterate over to check if permission is valid.

const permissions = ['listMeeting', 'seeMeeting', 'editMeeting', 'deleteMeeting']
NgxPermissionsService.loadPermissions(permissions) 
NgxPermissionsService.loadPermissions(permissions, (permissionName, permissionStore) => {
    return !!permissionStore[permissionName];
}) 

NOTE: This method will remove older permissions and pass only new;

Removing permissions

You can easily remove all permissions form the NgxPermissionsService (e.g. after user logged out or switched profile) by calling:

NgxPermissionsService.flushPermissions();

Alternatively you can use removePermission to delete defined permissions manually:

NgxPermissionsService.removePermission('user');

Retrieving permissions

And to get all user permissions use method getPermissions or use Observable permissions$:

var permissions = NgxPermissionsService.getPermissions();
 
NgxPermissionsService.permissions$.subscribe((permissions) => {
    console.log(permissions)
})

Managing roles

Before start

Make sure you are familiar with:

Overview

  1. Introduction
  2. Defining roles
  3. Individual roles
  4. Multiple roles
  5. Removing roles
  6. Getting all roles

Introduction

By definition a role is a named set of abilities (permissions) by which a specific group of users is identified. So for example USER or ANONYMOUS would be roles and not permissions. We can represent our USER role as a group of permissions that the role should be able to perform. For example: listArticles, editArticles and other custom server/browser validated privileges.

💡 Note
It's a good convention to name roles with UPPER_CASE, so roles like ACCOUNTANT or ADMIN are easier to distinguish from permissions.

Defining roles

Individual roles

Similarly to permissions we are gonna use here RolesService that exposes addRole allowing to define custom roles used by users in your application.

[...]
 
NgxRolesService
  .addRole('ROLE_NAME', ['permissionNameA', 'permissionNameB', 'permissionNameC', ...])
  
NgxRolesService.addRole('Guest', () => {
      return this.sessionService.checkSession().toPromise();
  }); 
 
NgxRolesService.addRole('Guest', () => {
      return true;
  }); 

Validation function are injected with any angular services. There are 2 local injectables available that can be used to implement more complex validation logic.

Parameter Description
roleName String representing name of checked role
transitionProperties Array or validation function

It also have to return one of values to properly represent results:

Validation result Returned value
Valid [true|Promise.resolve() but it should not resolve false]
Invalid [false|Promise.reject() or Promise.resolve(false)]

Note: Right now to make request to the backend it only supports promises Note: If at least one of request fulfils it will show the component

Usage of addRole is very similar to addPermissions:

NgxRolesService
  NgxPermission
  // Library will internally validate if 'listEvents' and 'editEvents' permissions are valid when checking if role is valid   
  .addRole('ADMIN', ['listEvents', 'editEvents']);  
  
NgxRolesService.addRole('Guest', () => {
      return this.sessionService.checkSession().toPromise();
  });  
  

Multiple roles

Service NgxRolesService allows you define multiple roles with addRoles method. This method accepts Object containing keys as a role names and corresponding validators as values.

NgxRolesService    
  // Or use your own function/service to validate role
  .addRoles({
    'USER': ['canReadInvoices'],
    'ADMIN': ['canReadInvoices','canEditInvoices','canUploadImages'],
    'GUEST': () => {
        return this.sessionService.checkSessions().toPromise();
    }
  });

💡 Note

Removing roles

To remove all roles use flushRoles method:

NgxRolesService.flushRoles();

Alternatively you can use removeRole to delete defined role manually:

NgxRolesService.removeRole('USER');

Getting all roles

To get specific role use method getRole:

let role = NgxRolesService.getRole('roleName');

And to get all roles form NgxRolesService use method getRoles or use Observable roles$:

let roles = NgxRolesService.getRoles();
 
NgxRolesService.roles$.subscribe((data) => {
    console.log(data);
})

Controlling access in views

Overview

  1. Permission directive
  2. Basic usage

Permission directive

Permission module exposes directive ngxPermissionsOnly and ngxPermissionsExcept that can show/hide elements of your application based on set of permissions.

🔥 Important
Else, then syntax is supported.
Note if you use then block don't put anything in main block it will be not visible, only then block will be used.

Permission directive accepts several attributes:

Attribute Value Description
ngxPermissionsOnly [String | String[]] Single or multiple permissions allowed to access content
ngxPermissionsExcept [String | String[]] Single or multiple permissions denied to access content
(permissionsAuthorized) EventEmitter EventEmitter emitted when authorized
(permissionsUnauthorized) EventEmitter EventEmitter emitted when unAuthorized

Basic usage

Directives accepts either single permission that has to be met in order to display it's content, You can use both ngxPermissionsOnly and ngxPermissionsExcept at the same time:

<ng-template [ngxPermissionsOnly]="['ADMIN']" (permissionsAuthorized)="yourCustomAuthorizedFunction()" (permissionsUnauthorized)="yourCustomAuthorizedFunction()">
    <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
 </ng-template>
 <ng-template [ngxPermissionsOnly]="'ADMIN'"  [ngxPermissionsExcept]="'Manager'">
    <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
 </ng-template>
  <ng-template ngxPermissionsOnly="ADMIN">
    <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
 </ng-template>
 
 <ng-template [ngxPermissionsExcept]="['JOHNY']">
   <div> All will see it except JOHNY</div>
 </ng-template>

Or set of permissions separated by 'coma':

<ng-template [ngxPermissionsOnly]="['ADMIN', 'GUEST']">
    <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
</ng-template>
 
 <ng-template [ngxPermissionsExcept]="['ADMIN', 'JOHNY']">
   <div>All will see it except admin and Johny</div>
 </ng-template>
  <ng-template [ngxPermissionsExcept]="['ADMIN', 'JOHNY']" [ngxPermissionsOnly]="['MANAGER']">
    <div>All will see it except admin and Johny</div>
  </ng-template>
  
  <ng-template [ngxPermissionsExcept]="['MANAGER']" 
  [ngxPermissionExceptThen]="thenBlock" 
  [ngxPermissionExceptElse]="elseBlock">
    </ng-template>
   <ng-template #elseBlock>
       <div>elseBlock</div>
   </ng-template>
   <ng-template #thenBlock>
       <div>thenBlock</div>
   </ng-template>
   
   <ng-template
     [ngxPermissionsOnly]="['MANAGER']" 
     [ngxPermissionsOnlyThen]="thenBlock" 
     [ngxPermissionsOnlyElse]="elseBlock">
       </ng-template>
      <ng-template #elseBlock>
          <div>elseBlock</div>
      </ng-template>
      <ng-template #thenBlock>
          <div>thenBlock</div>
      </ng-template>
    
    
 

Or just simply by *

<div *ngxPermissionsOnly="['ADMIN', 'GUEST']">
    <div>You can see this text congrats</div>
</div>
 
 <div *ngxPermissionsOnly="['THEN_BLOCK']; else elseBlock; then thenBlock">main</div>
     <ng-template #elseBlock>
         <div>elseBlock</div>
     </ng-template>
     <ng-template #thenBlock>
         <div>thenBlock</div>
     </ng-template>
     
 <div *ngxPermissionsExcept="['THEN_BLOCK']; else elseBlock; then thenBlock"></div>
       <ng-template #elseBlock>
           <div>elseBlock</div>
       </ng-template>
       <ng-template #thenBlock>
           <div>thenBlock</div>
       </ng-template>
 

Note: You cant use * style with other * style directives like *ngIf. You should wrap them. And YES i don't like it either.

 <div *ngxPermissionsOnly="['ADMIN', 'GUEST']">
  <div *ngIf="true">
    You can see this text congrats
  </div>
 </div>
 

🔥 Important
Using with except and only together should use ngxPermissionsElse or ngxPermissionsThen

    <ng-template [ngxPermissionsExcept]="'FAIL_BLOCK'" 
    [ngxPermissionsOnly]="'ONLY_BLOCK'"
    [ngxPermissionsElse]="elseBlock"
    [ngxPermissionsThen]="thenBlock">
              
    </ng-template>
    <ng-template #elseBlock>
        <div>elseBlock</div>
    </ng-template>
    <ng-template #thenBlock>
        <div>thenBlock</div>
    </ng-template>

Usage with Routes

  1. Introduction
  2. Property only and except
  3. Single permission/role
  4. Multiple permissions/roles
  5. Dynamic access
  6. Property redirectTo
  7. Single rule redirection
  8. Multiple rule redirection
  9. Dynamic redirection rules
  10. Implemented Guards
  11. Can Activate Guard
  12. Can Load Guard
  13. Can Activate Child Guard
  14. Common use cases
  15. Two guards when first make request for authorisation and gets permissions second checks for permissions

Introduction

Now you are ready to start working with controlling access to the states of your application. In order to restrict any state ngx-permission rely on angular-route's data property, reserving key permissions allowing to define authorization configuration.

Permissions object accepts following properties:

Property Accepted value
only [String|Array|Function]
except [String|Array|Function]
redirectTo [String]

Property only and except

Property only:

  • is used to explicitly define permission or role that are allowed to access the state
  • when used as String contains single permission or role
  • when used as Array contains set of permissions and/or roles

Property except:

  • is used to explicitly define permission or role that are denied to access the state
  • when used as String contains single permission or role
  • when used as Array contains set of permissions and/or roles

🔥 Important
If you combine both only and except properties you have to make sure they are not excluding each other, because denied roles/permissions would not allow access the state for users even if allowed ones would pass them.

Single permission/role

In simplest cases you allow users having single role permission to access the state. To achieve that you can pass as String desired role/permission to only/except property: You can use except and only at the same time;

import { RouterModule, Routes } from '@angular/router';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { HomeComponent } from './home/home.component';
import { NgxPermissionsGuard } from 'ngx-permissions';
 
const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: 'home',
    component: HomeComponent,
    canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
    data: {
      permissions: {
        only: 'ADMIN'
      }
    }
  },
];
@NgModule({
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
  ],
  exports: [
    RouterModule
  ]
})
export class AppRoutingModule {}
 

In given case when user is trying to access home state NgxPermissionsGuard service is called checking if isAuthorized permission is valid:

  • if permission definition is not found it stops transition

Multiple permissions/roles

Often several permissions/roles are sufficient to allow/deny user to access the state. Then array value comes in handy:

import { RouterModule, Routes } from '@angular/router';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { HomeComponent } from './home/home.component';
import { NgxPermissionsGuard } from 'ngx-permissions';
 
const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: 'home',
    component: HomeComponent,
    canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
    data: {
      permissions: {
        only: ['ADMIN', 'MODERATOR'],
        except: ['GUEST']
      }
    }
  },
];
@NgModule({
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
  ],
  exports: [
    RouterModule
  ]
})
export class AppRoutingModule {}

When NgxPermissionsGuard service will be called it would expect user to have either ADMIN or MODERATOR permissions to pass him to home route.

Dynamic access

You can find states that would require to verify access dynamically - often depending on parameters.

Let's imagine situation where user want to modify the invoice. We need to check every time if he is allowed to do that on state level. We are gonna use ActivatedRouteSnapshot and RouterStateSnapshot object to check weather he is able to do that.

To make AOT compatible you should export function. Below is presented code AOT Compatible

AOT compatible

export function testPermissions(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) {
  if (route.params['id'] === 42) {
    return ['MANAGER', "UTILS"]
  } else {
    return 'ADMIN'
  }
}
const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: 'dynamic/:id',
      component: HomeComponent,
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
        permissions: {
          only: testPermissions
        }
      }
    }
];

💀 Warning
Below is presented code not AOT compatible

const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: 'dynamic/:id',
      component: HomeComponent,
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
        permissions: {
          only: (route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) => {
              if (route.params['id'] === 42) {
                  return ['MANAGER', "UTILS"]
                } else {
                  return 'ADMIN'
                }
          }
        }
      }
    }
];

So whenever we try access state with param id = 42 set to true additional check for permission manager and utils will be made. Otherwise only ADMIN will be required.

🔥 Important
Notice that function require to always return array or string of roles/permissions in order to work properly.

Property redirectTo

Property redirectTo:

  • when used as String defines single redirection rule
  • when used as Objects defines single/multiple redirection rules
  • when used as Function defines dynamic redirection rule(s)

Single redirection rule

In case you want to redirect to some specific state when user is not authorized pass to redirectTo path of that route.

import { RouterModule, Routes } from '@angular/router';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { HomeComponent } from './home/home.component';
import { NgxPermissionsGuard } from 'ngx-permissions';
 
const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: 'home',
    component: HomeComponent,
    canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
    data: {
      permissions: {
        only: ['ADMIN', 'MODERATOR'],
        redirectTo: '/another-route'
      }
    }
  },
];
@NgModule({
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
  ],
  exports: [
    RouterModule
  ]
})
export class AppRoutingModule {}

In order to pass additional properties like params use pass redirectTo as object. navigationCommands and navigationExtras are reserved words it corresponds to parameters passed to router.navigate function navigate(commands: any[], extras: NavigationExtras): Promise<boolean>

 
const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: 'home',
    component: HomeComponent,
    canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
    data: {
      permissions: {
        only: ['ADMIN', 'MODERATOR'],
        redirectTo: {
            navigationCommands: ['123'],
            navigationExtras: {
                skipLocationChange: true
            }
        }               
    }
  },
];
@NgModule({
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
  ],
  exports: [
    RouterModule
  ]
})

Multiple redirection rules

In some situation you want to redirect user based on denied permission/role to create redirection strategies. In order to do that you have to create redirection Object that contain keys representing rejected permissions or roles and values implementing redirection rules.

Redirection rules are represented by following values:

Value type Return Usage
String [String] Simple state transitions
Object [Object] Redirection with custom parameters or options
Function [String|Object] Dynamic properties-based redirection

💡 Note
Use default property that will handle fallback redirect for not defined permissions.

The simplest example of multiple redirection rules are redirection based on pairs role/permission and state. When user is not granted to access the state will be redirected to agendaList if missing canReadAgenda permission or to dashboard when missing canEditAgenda. Property default is reserved for cases when you want handle specific cases leaving default redirection.

  const appRoutes: Routes = [
    { path: 'home',
      component: HomeComponent,
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
       permissions: {
               only: ['canReadAgenda','canEditAgenda'],
               redirectTo: {
                 canReadAgenda: 'agendaList',
                 canEditAgenda: 'dashboard',
                 default: 'login'
               }
        }
      }
    },
  ];
  @NgModule({
    imports: [
      RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
    ],
    exports: [
      RouterModule
    ]
  })

If you need more control over redirection parameters Object as a value can be used to customise target url navigationCommands and transition navigationExtras.

💡 Note navigationCommands and navigationExtras are reserved words it corresponds to parameters passed to router.navigate function navigate(commands: any[], extras: NavigationExtras): Promise<boolean>

 
  const appRoutes: Routes = [
    { path: 'home',
      component: HomeComponent,
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
         permissions: {
               only: ['canEditAgenda'],
               redirectTo: 
                 canEditAgenda{
                   navigationCommands: 'dashboard',
                   navigationExtras: {
                       skipLocationChange: true
                   }
                 
                 },
                 default: 'login'
             }
          }
      }
    },
  ];
  @NgModule({
    imports: [
      RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
    ],
    exports: [
      RouterModule
    ]
  })  

To present usage redirectTo as Object with values as Function in a state definition agenda presented below redirection rules are interpreted as:

  • when user does not have canReadAgenda invoked function returns string representing the state name to which unauthorized user will be redirected
  • when user does not have canEditAgenda invoked function returns object with custom options and params that will be passed along to transited dashboard url
 
 const appRoutes: Routes = [
    { path: 'home',
      component: HomeComponent,
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
       permissions: {
              only: ['canReadAgenda','canEditAgenda'],
              redirectTo: {
                canReadAgenda: (rejectedPermissionName: string, activateRouteSnapshot: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, routeStateSnapshot: RouterStateSnapshot) => {
                  return 'dashboard';
                },
                canEditAgenda: (rejectedPermissionName: string, activateRouteSnapshot: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, routeStateSnapshot: RouterStateSnapshot) => {
                  return {
                      navigationCommands: ['/dashboard'],
                      navigationExtras: {
                          skipLocationChange: true
                      }
                  }
                },
                default: 'login'
            }
        }
      }
    },
  ];
  @NgModule({
    imports: [
      RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
    ],
    exports: [
      RouterModule
    ]
  })

🔥 Important
Above code is not AOT compatible to make it AOT compatible extract it to function navigationCommands and navigationExtras reserved words. Matching parameter to router.navigate function

export function canReadAgenda(rejectedPermissionName: string, activateRouteSnapshot: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, routeStateSnapshot: RouterStateSnapshot) => {                                                 
    return 'dashboard';
},
 
redirectTo{
    canReadAgendacanReadAgenda
 
}

Dynamic redirection rules

Similarly to examples showing defining dynamic access to state redirection can also be defined based on any parameters of ActivatedRouteSnapshot and RouterStateSnapshot;

💡 Note
Remember to always return from function state name or object.

const appRoutes: Routes = [
    { path: 'home/:isEditable',
      component: HomeComponent,
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
      permissions: {
             only: ['canReadAgenda','canEditAgenda'],
             redirectTo: (rejectedPermissionName: string, activateRouteSnapshot: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, routerStateSnapshot: RouterStateSnapshot) => {
               if(activateRouteSnapshot.params['id'] === 42){
                 return 'login';
               } else {
                 return 'dashboard'
               }
             }
      }
    },
  ];
  @NgModule({
    imports: [
      RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
    ],
    exports: [
      RouterModule
    ]
  })

🔥 Important
Above code is not AOT compatible to make it AOT compatible extract it to function

export function redirectToFunc(rejectedPermissionName: string, activateRouteSnapshot: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, routerStateSnapshot: RouterStateSnapshot) => {
     if(activateRouteSnapshot.params['id'] === 42){
       return 'login';
     } else {
       return 'dashboard'
     }
   }
 
redirectToredirectToFunc

Implemented Guards

Can Activate Guard

NgxPermissionsGuard implements CanActivate interface for examples you can see above

Can Load Guard

NgxPermissionsGuard implements CanLoad Interface. Functionality is the same as with canActivate

const appRoutes: Routes = [
 
  {
    path: 'lazy',
    data: {
      permissions: {
        except: 'ADDDMIN',
      }
    },
    canLoad: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
    loadChildren: 'app/lazy-module/lazy-module.module#LazyModule'
  },
 
 
];
@NgModule({
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes)
  ],
  exports: [
    RouterModule
  ],
  providers: [
    // CanDeactivateGuard
  ]
})
export class AppRoutingModule {}
 
 
 

🔥 Warning

  • The only difference if you use as a function the parameter is only 1 and its type of Route
 
{
    path'lazy',
    data{
      permissions{
         only: (route: Route) => {
                  //logic here
                   return ['MANAGER', "UTILS"]
                  }
      }
    },
    canLoad[NgxPermissionsGuard],
    loadChildren'app/lazy-module/lazy-module.module#LazyModule'
  },

Can Activate Child Guard

NgxPermissionsGuard implements CanLoad Interface. Functionality is the same as with canActivate

🔥 Warning

  • Need to remember that rules and data you should specify on Child Components not on parent component
const appRoutes: Routes = [
  { path: '',
    component: IsolateComponent,
    canActivateChild: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
    children: [
      {
        path: 'except-should',
        component: AnotherComponent,
        data: {
          permissions: {
            except: 'ADMIN'
          }
        }
      },
      {
        path: 'only-should',
        component: ComeComponent,
        data: {
          permissions: {
            only: 'GUEST'
          }
        }
      },
    ]
  },
];

Common use cases

Two guards when first make request for authorisation and gets permissions second checks for permissions

This method only works with angular 4.3.2 or higher see https://github.com/angular/angular/issues/15670

There are a lot of times you have 2 guard one for authorisation when it makes request for permissions and second is permissions guard and you want them to work in chain. To make them work in chain You should use them next

 
let routes = [
  { path: '', 
    canActivate: [AuthGuard],
    children: [
      {path: 'component', 
      component: ComponentName, 
      canActivate: [NgxPermissionsGuard],
      data: {
         permissions: {
           only: ['ADMIN', 'MODERATOR'],
           redirectTo: 'another-route'
         }
       }}
    ]
  }
]

Note: Make sure the permission request in chained in auth guard

   canActivate() {
       return authLogin().then((obj) => {
           // or load here if you dont need second request
           // this.permissions.service.loadPermissions(obj.permissions)
          
           return this.authPermissions.getPermissions('url');
       }).then((permissions) => {
           this.permissions.service.loadPermissions(permissions)
       )
   }

| --- |

Development

To generate all *.js, *.d.ts and *.metadata.json files:

$ npm run build

To lint all *.ts files:

$ npm run lint

Thank You

Thank You for using the library and support. HAVE A GREAT DAY!

For google

angular 2 permissions, angular 4 permissions, angular permissions, angular 5 permissions ng2 permissions ng permissions ng-permissions ng2-permissions angular2 permissions angular4 permissions angular 5 permissions

License

MIT © Oleksandr Khymenko

install

npm i ngx-permissions

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8,623

version

6.0.4

license

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