Nondigestible Purple Mayonnaise

    nb.sh

    6.3.5 • Public • Published

    nb

    Build Status


    nb is a command line and local web note‑taking, bookmarking, archiving, and knowledge base application with:

    and more, in a single portable script.

    nb creates notes in text-based formats like Markdown, Org, and LaTeX, can work with files in any format, can import and export notes to many document formats, and can create private, password-protected encrypted notes and bookmarks. With nb, you can write notes using Vim, Emacs, VS Code, Sublime Text, and any other text editor you like, as well as terminal and GUI web browsers. nb works in any standard Linux / Unix environment, including macOS and Windows via WSL. Optional dependencies can be installed to enhance functionality, but nb works great without them.

    home

    nb is also a powerful bookmarking system featuring:

    • locally-served, text-centric, distraction-free bookmark browsing in terminal and GUI web browsers,
    • local full-text search of cached page content with regular expression support,
    • convenient filtering and listing,
    • Internet Archive Wayback Machine snapshot lookup for broken links,
    • tagging, pinning, linking, and full integration with other nb features.

    Page information is downloaded, cleaned up, structured, and saved into normal Markdown documents made for humans, so bookmarks are easy to view and edit just like any other note.

    nb browse

    nb uses Git in the background to automatically record changes and sync notebooks with remote repositories. nb can also be configured to sync notebooks using a general purpose syncing utility like Dropbox so notes can be edited in other apps on any device.

    nb list empty

    nb is designed to be portable, future-focused, and vendor independent, providing a full-featured and intuitive experience within a highly composable multimodal user-centric text interface. The entire program is contained within a single well-tested shell script that can be installed, copied, or curled almost anywhere and just work, using a strategy inspired by progressive enhancement for various experience improvements in more capable environments. nb works great whether you have one notebook with just a few notes or dozens of notebooks containing thousands of notes, bookmarks, and other items. nb makes it easy to incorporate other tools, writing apps, and workflows. nb can be used a little, a lot, once in a while, or for just a subset of features. nb is flexible.

    📝 🔖 🔒 🔍 📔


    nb

    Installation · Overview  

    Help

     ↑ 

    Installation

    Dependencies

    Required
    Optional

    nb leverages standard command line tools and works in standard Linux / Unix environments. nb also checks the environment for some additional optional tools and uses them to enhance the experience whenever they are available.

    Recommended:

    Also supported for various enhancements:

    Ack, afplay, Ag - The Silver Searcher, exa, ffplay, ImageMagick, GnuPG, highlight, imgcat, kitty's icat kitten, Links, Lynx, Midnight Commander, mpg123, MPlayer, ncat, note-link-janitor (via plugin), pdftotext, Pygments, Ranger, readability-cli, rga / ripgrep-all, termpdf.py, vifm

    macOS / Homebrew

    brew tap xwmx/taps
    brew install nb

    Installing nb with Homebrew also installs the recommended dependencies above and completion scripts for Bash and Zsh.

    Ubuntu, Windows WSL, and others

    npm
    npm install -g nb.sh

    After npm installation completes, run sudo "$(which nb)" completions install to install Bash and Zsh completion scripts (recommended).

    On Ubuntu and WSL, you can run sudo "$(which nb)" env install to install the optional dependencies.

    nb is also available under its original package name, notes.sh, which comes with an extra notes executable wrapping nb.

    Download and Install

    To install as an administrator, copy and paste one of the following multi-line commands:

    # install using wget
    sudo wget https://raw.github.com/xwmx/nb/master/nb -O /usr/local/bin/nb &&
      sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/nb &&
      sudo nb completions install
    
    # install using curl
    sudo curl -L https://raw.github.com/xwmx/nb/master/nb -o /usr/local/bin/nb &&
      sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/nb &&
      sudo nb completions install

    On Ubuntu and WSL, you can run sudo nb env install to install the optional dependencies.

    User-only Installation

    To install with just user permissions, simply add the nb script to your $PATH. If you already have a ~/bin directory, for example, you can use one of the following commands:

    # download with wget
    wget https://raw.github.com/xwmx/nb/master/nb -O ~/bin/nb && chmod +x ~/bin/nb
    
    # download with curl
    curl -L https://raw.github.com/xwmx/nb/master/nb -o ~/bin/nb && chmod +x ~/bin/nb

    Installing with just user permissions doesn't include the optional dependencies or completions, but nb core functionality works without them. If you have sudo access and want to install the completion scripts and dependencies, run the following command:

    sudo nb env install
    Make

    To install with Make, clone this repository, navigate to the clone's root directory, and run:

    sudo make install

    This will also install the completion scripts on all systems and the recommended dependencies on Ubuntu and WSL.

    bpkg

    To install with bpkg:

    bpkg install xwmx/nb

    Tab Completion

    Bash and Zsh tab completion should be enabled when nb is installed using the methods above, assuming you have the appropriate system permissions or installed with sudo. If completion isn't working after installing nb, see the completion installation instructions.

    Updating

    When nb is installed using a package manager like npm or Homebrew, use the package manager's upgrade functionality to update nb to the latest version. When installed via other methods, nb can be updated to the latest version using the nb update subcommand.

    Overview

    Notes · Adding · Listing · Editing · Viewing · Deleting · Bookmarks · Tagging · Linking · Browsing · Zettelkasten · Folders · Pinning · Search · Moving & Renaming · History · Notebooks · Git Sync · Import / Export · set & settings · Color Themes · Plugins · Selectors · Shell · Shortcuts · Help · Specifications · Tests

     ↑ 

    To get started, simply run:

    nb

    nb sets up your initial "home" notebook the first time it runs.

    By default, notebooks and notes are global (at ~/.nb), so they are always available to nb regardless of the current working directory. nb also supports local notebooks.

    📝 Notes

    Adding

    ↑ · nb add, nb browse add

    Use nb add (shortcuts: nb a, nb +) to create new notes:

    # create a new note in your text editor
    nb add
    
    # create a new note with the filename "example.md"
    nb add example.md
    
    # create a new note containing "This is a note."
    nb add "This is a note."
    
    # create a new note with piped content
    echo "Note content." | nb add
    
    # create a new password-protected, encrypted note titled "Secret Document"
    nb add --title "Secret Document" --encrypt
    
    # create a new note in the notebook named "example"
    nb example:add "This is a note."
    
    # create a new note in the folder named "sample"
    nb add sample/

    nb add with no arguments or input will open the new, blank note in your environment's preferred text editor. You can change your editor using the $EDITOR environment variable or nb set editor.

    nb files are Markdown files by default. The default file type can be changed to whatever you like using nb set default_extension.

    nb add has intelligent argument parsing and behaves differently depending on the types of arguments it receives. When a filename with extension is specified, a new note with that filename is opened in the editor:

    nb add example.md

    When a string is specified, a new note is immediately created with that string as the content and without opening the editor:

    ❯ nb add "This is a note."
    Added: [1] 20200101000000.md

    nb add <string> is useful for quickly jotting down notes directly via the command line. Quoting content is optional, but recommended.

    When no filename is specified, nb add uses the current datetime as the filename.

    nb add can also recieve piped content, which behaves the same as nb add <string>:

    # create a new note containing "Note content."echo "Note content." | nb add
    Added: [6] 20200101000100.md
    
    # create a new note containing the clipboard contents on macOS
    ❯ pbpaste | nb add
    Added: [7] 20200101000200.md
    
    # create a new note containing the clipboard contents using xclip
    ❯ xclip -o | nb add
    Added: [8] 20200101000300.md

    Content can be passed with the --content option, which also creates a new note without opening the editor:

    nb add --content "Note content."

    When content is piped, specified with --content, or passed as a string argument, use the --edit flag to open the file in the editor before the change is committed.

    The title, filename, and content can also be specified with long and short options:

    ❯ nb add --filename "example.md" -t "Example Title" -c "Example content."
    Added: [9] example.md "Example Title"

    The -t <title> / --title <title> option also sets the filename to the title, lowercased with spaces and non-filename characters replaced with underscores:

    ❯ nb add --title "Example Title" "Example content."
    Added: [10] example_title.md "Example Title"

    Tags can be added with the --tags <tag1>,<tag2>... option, which takes a comma separated list of tags, converts them to #hashtags, and inserts them between the title and content:

    ❯ nb add "Example content." --title "Tagged Example" --tags tag1,tag2
    Added: [11] tagged_example.md "Tagged Example"
    
    ❯ nb show 11 --print
    # Tagged Example
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    Example content.

    Search for tagged items with nb search / nb q:

    nb search "#tag1" "#tag2"

    Files can be created with any file type by specifying the extension either in the filename (example.md), the extension by itself (.md), or via the --type <type> option (--type md):

    # open a new Org file in the editor
    nb add example.org
    
    # open a new reStructuredText file in the editor
    nb add --type rst
    
    # open a new JavaScript file in the editor
    nb add .js

    Combining a type argument with piped clipboard content provides a very convenient way to save code snippets using a clipboard utility such as pbpaste, xclip, or pb:

    # save the clipboard contents as a JavaScript file in the current notebook
    pb | nb add .js
    
    # save the clipboard contents as a Rust file in the "rust" notebook
    # using the shortcut alias `nb a`
    pb | nb a rust: .rs
    
    # save the clipboard contents as a Haskell file named "example.hs" in the
    # "snippets" notebook using the shortcut alias `nb +`
    pb | nb + snippets: example.hs

    Use nb show and nb browse to view code snippets with automatic syntax highlighting and use nb edit to open in your editor.

    Piping, --title <title>, --tags <tag-list>, --content <content>, and content passed in an argument can be combined as needed to create notes with content from multiple input methods and sources using a single command:

    ❯ pb | nb add "Argument content." \
        --title   "Sample Title"      \
        --tags    tag1,tag2           \
        --content "Option content."
    Added: [12] sample_title.md "Sample Title"
    
    ❯ nb show 12 --print
    # Sample Title
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    Argument content.
    
    Option content.
    
    Clipboard content.

    For a full list of options available for nb add, run nb help add.

    Password-Protected Encrypted Notes and Bookmarks

    Password-protected notes and bookmarks are created with the -e / --encrypt flag and encrypted with AES-256 using OpenSSL by default. GPG is also supported and can be configured with nb set encryption_tool.

    Each protected note and bookmark is encrypted individually with its own password. When an encrypted item is viewed, edited, or opened, nb will simply prompt for the item's password before proceeding. After an item is edited, nb automatically re-encrypts it and saves the new version.

    Encrypted notes can be decrypted using the OpenSSL and GPG command line tools directly, so you aren't dependent on nb to decrypt your files.

    Shortcut Aliases: nb a, nb +

    nb includes shortcuts for many commands, including nb a and nb + for nb add:

    # create a new note in your text editor
    nb a
    
    # create a new note with the filename "example.md"
    nb a example.md
    
    # create a new note containing "This is a note."
    nb + "This is a note."
    
    # create a new note containing the clipboard contents with xclip
    xclip -o | nb +
    
    # create a new note in the notebook named "example"
    nb example:a
    Other Aliases: nb create, nb new

    nb add can also be invoked with nb create and nb new for convenience:

    # create a new note containing "Example note content."
    nb new "Example note content."
    
    # create a new note with the title "Example Note Title"
    nb create --title "Example Note Title"
    Adding with nb browse

    Items can also be added within terminal and GUI web browsers using nb browse add / nb br a:

    ❯ nb browse add
    ❯nb · home : +
    
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    
    [add]

    Pass a filename, relative path, and / or notebook name to create a new note at that location:

    # open the add form in the browser to create the file "file.md" in the folder "example"
    nb browse add "example/file.md"

    nb browse add includes options for quickly pre-populating new notes with content:

    ❯ nb browse add --title "Example Title" --content "Example content." --tags tag1,tag2
    ❯nb · home : +
    
    [# Example Title                                      ]
    [                                                     ]
    [#tag1 #tag2                                          ]
    [                                                     ]
    [Example content.                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    [                                                     ]
    
    [add]

    nb browse add can also be opened with nb add --browse / nb a -b.

    For more information, see Browsing.

    Listing & Filtering

    ↑ · nb ls, nb list, nb browse

    To list notes and notebooks, run nb ls (shortcut alias: nb):

    ❯ nb ls
    home
    ----
    [3] example.md · "Example content."
    [2] todos.md · "Todos:"
    [1] ideas.md · "- Example idea one."

    nb ls

    Notebooks are listed above the line, with the current notebook highlighted and/or underlined, depending on terminal capabilities. nb ls also includes a footer with example commands for easy reference. The notebook header and command footer can be configured or hidden with nb set header and nb set footer.

    Notes from the current notebook are listed in the order they were last modified. By default, each note is listed with its id, filename, and an excerpt from the first line of the note. When a note has a title, the title is displayed instead of the filename and first line.

    Markdown titles can be defined within a note using either Markdown h1 style or YAML front matter:

    # Example Title
    Todos
    =====
    ---
    title: Ideas
    ---

    Org and LaTeX titles are recognized in .org and .latex files:

    #+TITLE: Example Org Title
    
    \title{Example LaTeX Title}

    Once defined, titles are displayed in place of the filename and first line in the output of nb ls:

    ❯ nb ls
    home
    ----
    [3] Example Title
    [2] Todos
    [1] Ideas

    Pass an id, filename, or title to view the listing for that note:

    ❯ nb ls Todos
    [2] Todos
    ❯ nb ls 3
    [3] Example Title

    If there is no exact match, nb will list items with titles and filenames that fuzzy match the query:

    ❯ nb ls "idea"
    [1] Ideas

    A case-insensitive regular expression can also be used to filter filenames and titles:

    ❯ nb ls "^example.*"
    [3] Example Title

    Multiple words act like an OR filter, listing any titles or filenames that match any of the words:

    ❯ nb ls example ideas
    [3] Example Title
    [1] Ideas

    When multiple words are quoted, filter titles and filenames for that phrase:

    ❯ nb ls "example title"
    [3] Example Title

    For full text search, see Search.

    To view excerpts of notes, use the --excerpt or -e option, which optionally accepts a length:

    ❯ nb ls 3 --excerpt
    [3] Example Title
    -----------------
    # Example Title
    
    This is an example excerpt.
    
    ❯ nb ls 3 -e 8
    [3] Example Title
    -----------------
    # Example Title
    
    This is an example excerpt.
    
    More example content:
    - one
    - two
    - three

    Several classes of file types are represented with emoji indicators to make them easily identifiable in lists. For example, bookmarks and encrypted notes are listed with 🔖 and 🔒:

    ❯ nb ls
    home
    ----
    [4] Example Note
    [3] 🔒 encrypted-note.md.enc
    [2] 🔖 Example Bookmark (example.com)
    [1] 🔖 🔒 encrypted.bookmark.md.enc

    File types include:

     🔉  Audio
     📖  Book
     🔖  Bookmark
     🔒  Encrypted
     📂  Folder
     🌄  Image
     📄  PDF, Word, or Open Office document
     📹  Video
    

    By default, items are listed starting with the most recently modified. To reverse the order, use the -r or --reverse flag:

    ❯ nb ls
    home
    ----
    [2] Todos
    [3] Example Title
    [1] Ideas
    
    ❯ nb ls --reverse
    [1] Ideas
    [3] Example Title
    [2] Todos

    Notes can be sorted with the -s / --sort flag, which can be combined with -r / --reverse:

    ❯ nb ls
    home
    ----
    [2] Todos
    [3] Example Title
    [1] Ideas
    
    ❯ nb ls --sort
    [1] Ideas
    [2] Todos
    [3] Example Title
    
    ❯ nb ls --sort --reverse
    [3] Example Title
    [2] Todos
    [1] Ideas

    nb with no subcommand behaves like an alias for nb ls, so the examples above can be run without the ls:

    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [2] Todos
    [3] Example Title
    [1] Ideas
    
    ❯ nb "^example.*"
    [3] Example Title
    
    ❯ nb 3 --excerpt
    [3] Example Title
    -----------------
    # Example Title
    
    This is an example excerpt.
    
    ❯ nb 3 -e 8
    [3] Example Title
    -----------------
    # Example Title
    
    This is an example excerpt.
    
    More example content:
    - one
    - two
    - three
    
    ❯ nb --sort
    [1] Ideas
    [2] Todos
    [3] Example Title
    
    ❯ nb --sort --reverse
    [3] Example Title
    [2] Todos
    [1] Ideas

    Short options can be combined for brevity:

    # equivalent to `nb --sort --reverse --excerpt 2` and `nb -s -r -e 2`:
    ❯ nb -sre 2
    [3] Example Title
    -----------------
    # Example Title
    
    [2] Todos
    ---------
    Todos
    =====
    [1] Ideas
    ---------
    ---
    title: Ideas

    nb and nb ls display the 15 most recently modified items. The default limit can be changed with nb set limit <number>. To list a different number of items on a per-command basis, use the -n <limit>, --limit <limit>, --<limit>, -a, and --all flags:

    ❯ nb -n 1
    home
    ----
    [5] Example Five
    4 omitted. 5 total.
    
    ❯ nb --limit 2
    home
    ----
    [5] Example Five
    [4] Example Four
    3 omitted. 5 total.
    
    ❯ nb --3
    home
    ----
    [5] Example Five
    [4] Example Four
    [3] Example Three
    2 omitted. 5 total.
    
    ❯ nb --all
    home
    ----
    [5] Example Five
    [4] Example Four
    [3] Example Three
    [2] Example Two
    [1] Example One

    nb ls is a combination of nb notebooks and nb list in one view and accepts the same arguments as nb list, which lists only notes without the notebook list and with no limit by default:

    ❯ nb list
    [100] Example One Hundred
    [99]  Example Ninety-Nine
    [98]  Example Ninety-Eight
    ... lists all notes ...
    [2]   Example Two
    [1]   Example One

    For more information about options for listing notes, run nb help ls and nb help list.

    Listing with browse

    Items can be listed within terminal and GUI web browsers using nb browse / nb br:

    ❯ nb browse example:sample/demo/
    ❯nb · example : sample / demo / +
    
    search: [                    ]
    
    [example:sample/demo/7] Title Seven
    [example:sample/demo/6] Title Six
    [example:sample/demo/5] Title Five
    [example:sample/demo/4] Title Four
    [example:sample/demo/3] Title Three
    
    next ❯

    For more information, see Browsing.

    Editing

    ↑ · nb edit, nb browse edit

    You can edit an item in your editor with nb edit (shortcut: nb e):

    # edit note by id
    nb edit 3
    
    # edit note by filename
    nb edit example.md
    
    # edit note by title
    nb edit "A Document Title"
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb edit example:12
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 edit
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:edit 12

    edit and other subcommands that take an identifier can be called with the identifier and subcommand name reversed:

    # edit note by id
    nb 3 edit

    nb edit can also receive piped content, which it appends to the specified note without opening the editor:

    echo "Content to append." | nb edit 1

    Content can be passed with the --content option, which also appends the content without opening the editor:

    nb edit 1 --content "Content to append."

    Use the --overwrite option to overwrite existing file content and the --prepend option to prepend the new content before existing content.

    When content is piped or specified with --content, use the --edit flag to open the file in the editor before the change is committed.

    Editing Encrypted Notes

    When a note is encrypted, nb edit will prompt you for the note password, open the unencrypted content in your editor, and then automatically reencrypt the note when you are done editing.

    Shortcut Alias: nb e

    nb edit can be called by the shortcut alias, nb e:

    # edit note by id
    nb e 3
    
    # edit note by filename
    nb e example.md
    
    # edit note by title
    nb e "A Document Title"
    
    # edit note by id, alternative
    nb 3 e
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb e example:12
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 e
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:e 12

    For nb edit help information, run nb help edit.

    Editing with browse

    Items can be edited within terminal and GUI web browsers using nb browse edit / nb br e:

    ❯ nb browse edit text:formats/markdown/123
    ❯nb · text : formats / markdown / 123 · ↓ · editing · - | +
    
    [# Daring Fireball: Markdown (daringfireball.net)         ]
    [                                                         ]
    [<https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/>          ]
    [                                                         ]
    [## Related                                               ]
    [                                                         ]
    [- <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown>               ]
    [                                                         ]
    [## Comments                                              ]
    [                                                         ]
    [See also:                                                ]
    [                                                         ]
    [- [[text:formats/org]]                                   ]
    [- [[cli:apps/nb]]                                        ]
    [                                                         ]
    [## Tags                                                  ]
    [                                                         ]
    
    [save] · last: 2021-01-01 01:00:00

    For more information, see browse edit and Browsing.

    Viewing

    ↑ · nb show, nb browse, nb open, nb peek

    Notes and other items can be viewed using nb show (shortcut: nb s):

    # show note by id
    nb show 3
    
    # show note by filename
    nb show example.md
    
    # show note by title
    nb show "A Document Title"
    
    # show note by id, alternative
    nb 3 show
    
    # show note 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb show example:12
    
    # show note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 show
    
    # show note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:show 12

    By default, nb show will open the note in less, with syntax highlighting if bat, highlight, or Pygments is installed. You can navigate in less using the following keys:

    Key               Function
    ---               --------
    mouse scroll      Scroll up or down
    arrow up or down  Scroll one line up or down
    f                 Jump forward one window
    b                 Jump back one window
    d                 Jump down one half window
    u                 Jump up one half window
    /<query>          Search for <query>
    n                 Jump to next <query> match
    q                 Quit
    

    If less scrolling isn't working in iTerm2, go to "Settings" -> "Advanced" -> "Scroll wheel sends arrow keys when in alternate screen mode" and change it to "Yes". More info

    Use the -p / --print option to print to standard output with syntax highlighting:

    ❯ nb show 123 --print
    # Example Title
    
    Example content:
    
    - one
    - two
    - three

    Use nb show --print --no-color to print without syntax highlighting.

    When Pandoc is available, use the -r / --render option to render the note to HTML and open it in your terminal browser:

    nb show example.md --render
    # opens example.md as an HTML page in w3m, links, or lynx

    nb show also supports previewing other file types in the terminal, depending on the tools available in the environment. Supported file types and tools include:

    When using nb show with other file types or if the above tools are not available, nb show will open files in your system's preferred application for each type.

    nb show also provides options for querying information about an item. For example, use the --added / -a and --updated / -u flags to print the date and time that an item was added or updated:

    ❯ nb show 2 --added
    2020-01-01 01:01:00 -0700
    
    ❯ nb show 2 --updated
    2020-02-02 02:02:00 -0700

    nb show is primarily intended for viewing items within the terminal. To view a file in the system's preferred GUI application, use nb open. To browse rendered items in terminal and GUI web browsers, use nb browse.

    For full nb show usage information, run nb help show.

    Shortcut Alias: nb s

    nb show can be called using the shortcut alias nb s:

    # show note by id
    nb s 3
    
    # show note by filename
    nb s example.md
    
    # show note by title
    nb s "A Document Title"
    
    # show note by id, alternative
    nb 3 s
    
    # show note 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb s example:12
    
    # show note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 s
    
    # show note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:s 12
    Alias: nb view

    nb show can also be invoked with nb view for convenience:

    # show note by id
    nb view 3
    
    # show note by filename
    nb view example.md
    
    # show note by title
    nb view "A Document Title"
    
    # show note by id, alternative
    nb 3 view
    Viewing with browse

    Items can be viewed within terminal and GUI web browsers using nb browse / nb br:

    ❯ nb browse text:formats/markdown/123
    ❯nb · text : formats / markdown / 123 · ↓ · edit | +
    Daring Fireball: Markdown (daringfireball.net)
    
    https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/
    
    Related
    
      • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown
    
    Comments
    
    See also:
    
      • [[text:formats/org]]
      • [[cli:apps/nb]]
    
    Tags
    
    #markup #plain-text
    
    Content
    
    Daring Fireball: Markdown
    
    Download
    
    Markdown 1.0.1 (18 KB) — 17 Dec 2004
    
    Introduction
    
    Markdown is a text-to-HTML conversion tool for web writers. Markdown allows
    you to write using an easy-to-read, easy-to-write plain text format, then
    convert it to structurally valid XHTML (or HTML).

    For more information, see Browsing.

    Deleting

    ↑ · nb delete, nb browse delete

    To delete one or more notes, pass any number of ids, filenames, titles, and other selectors to nb delete (shortcuts: nb d, nb -):

    # delete item by id
    nb delete 3
    
    # delete item by filename
    nb delete example.md
    
    # delete item by title
    nb delete "A Document Title"
    
    # delete item by id, alternative
    nb 3 delete
    
    # delete item 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb delete example:12
    
    # delete item 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 delete
    
    # delete item 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:delete 12
    
    # delete item 345 in the folder named "example"
    nb delete example/345
    
    # delete items with the ids 89, 56, and 21
    nb delete 89 56 21

    By default, nb delete will display a confirmation prompt. To skip, use the --force / -f option:

    nb delete 3 --force
    Shortcut Aliases: nb d, nb -

    delete has the aliases nb d and nb -:

    # delete note by id
    nb d 3
    
    # delete note by filename
    nb d example.md
    
    # delete note by title
    nb - "A Document Title"
    
    # delete note by id, alternative
    nb 3 d
    
    # delete note 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb - example:12
    
    # delete note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 d
    
    # delete note 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:d 12

    For nb delete help information, run nb help delete.

    Deleting with nb browse

    Items can be deleted within terminal and GUI web browsers using nb browse delete / nb br d:

    ❯ nb browse delete example:4
    ❯nb · example : 4 · ↓ · edit · - | +
    
                    deleting
    
    [4] example_file.md "Example Title"
    
                    [delete]
    
    

    For more information, see Browsing.

    🔖 Bookmarks

    ↑ · nb <url>, nb browse, nb bookmark, nb open, nb peek, nb show

    nb includes a bookmarking system to conveniently create, annotate, view, search, browse, and manage collections of bookmarks.

    nb bookmarks

    Bookmarks in nb are stored as simple structured Markdown files containing information extracted from the bookmarked pages.

    To create a new bookmark, pass a URL as the first argument to nb:

    nb https://example.com

    nb automatically generates a bookmark using information from the page:

    # Example Title (example.com)
    
    <https://example.com>
    
    ## Description
    
    Example description.
    
    ## Content
    
    Example Title
    =============
    
    This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
    use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
    permission.
    
    [More information\...](https://www.iana.org/domains/example)

    nb embeds the page content in the bookmark, making it available for full text search with nb search and locally-served, distraction-free reading and browsing with nb browse. When Pandoc is installed, the HTML page content is converted to Markdown. When readability-cli is installed, markup is cleaned up to focus on content.

    In addition to caching the page content, you can also include a quote from the page using the -q / --quote option:

    nb https://example.com --quote "Example quote line one.
    
    Example quote line two."
    # Example Title (example.com)
    
    <https://example.com>
    
    ## Description
    
    Example description.
    
    ## Quote
    
    > Example quote line one.
    >
    > Example quote line two.
    
    ## Content
    
    Example Title
    =============
    
    This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
    use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
    permission.
    
    [More information\...](https://www.iana.org/domains/example)

    Add a comment to a bookmark using the -c / --comment option:

    nb https://example.com --comment "Example comment."
    # Example Title (example.com)
    
    <https://example.com>
    
    ## Description
    
    Example description.
    
    ## Comment
    
    Example comment.
    
    ## Content
    
    Example Title
    =============
    
    This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
    use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
    permission.
    
    [More information\...](https://www.iana.org/domains/example)

    Bookmarks can be tagged using the -t / --tags option. Tags are converted into #hashtags:

    nb https://example.com --tags tag1,tag2
    # Example Title (example.com)
    
    <https://example.com>
    
    ## Description
    
    Example description.
    
    ## Tags
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    ## Content
    
    Example Title
    =============
    
    This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
    use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
    permission.
    
    [More information\...](https://www.iana.org/domains/example)

    Search for tagged bookmarks with nb search / nb q:

    nb search "#tag1"
    
    nb q "#tag"

    nb search / nb q automatically searches archived page content:

    ❯ nb q "example query"
    [10] 🔖 example.bookmark.md "Example Bookmark (example.com)"
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    5:Lorem ipsum example query.

    Bookmarks can also be encrypted:

    # create a new password-protected, encrypted bookmark
    nb https://example.com --encrypt

    Encrypted bookmarks require a password before they can be viewed or opened.

    Listing and Filtering Bookmarks

    nb bookmark lists

    Bookmarks are included in nb, nb ls, nb list, and nb browse along with items of other types. nb bookmark and nb bookmark list can be used to list and filter only bookmarks:

    ❯ nb bookmark
    Add: nb <url> Help: nb help bookmark
    ------------------------------------
    [3] 🔖 🔒 example.bookmark.md.enc
    [2] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.com)
    [1] 🔖 Bookmark One (example.com)
    
    ❯ nb bookmark list two
    [2] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.com)

    Bookmarks are also included in nb, nb ls, and nb list:

    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [7] 🔖 Bookmark Three (example.com)
    [6] Example Note
    [5] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.net)
    [4] Sample Note
    [3] 🔖 🔒 example-encrypted.bookmark.md.enc
    [2] Demo Note
    [1] 🔖 Bookmark One (example.com)

    Use the --type <type> / --<type> option as a filter to display only bookmarks:

    ❯ nb --type bookmark
    [7] 🔖 Bookmark Three (example.com)
    [5] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.net)
    [3] 🔖 🔒 example-encrypted.bookmark.md.enc
    [1] 🔖 Bookmark One (example.com)
    
    ❯ nb --bookmark
    [7] 🔖 Bookmark Three (example.com)
    [5] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.net)
    [3] 🔖 🔒 example-encrypted.bookmark.md.enc
    [1] 🔖 Bookmark One (example.com)

    nb saves the domain in the title, making it easy to filter by domain using any list subcommands:

    ❯ nb example.com
    [7] 🔖 Bookmark Three (example.com)
    [1] 🔖 Bookmark One (example.com)

    For more listing options, see nb help ls, nb help list, and nb help bookmark.

    Shortcut Alias: nb bk

    nb bookmark can also be used with the alias nb bk:

    ❯ nb bk
    Add: nb <url> Help: nb help bookmark
    ------------------------------------
    [7] 🔖 Bookmark Three (example.com)
    [5] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.net)
    [3] 🔖 🔒 example-encrypted.bookmark.md.enc
    [1] 🔖 Bookmark One (example.com)
    
    ❯ nb bk example.net
    [5] 🔖 Bookmark Two (example.net)

    Viewing Bookmarks

    ↑ · nb browse, nb open, nb peek, nb show

    nb provides multiple ways to view bookmark files, bookmarked content, and bookmarked URLs.

    Use nb browse (shortcut: nb br) to browse bookmarks with cached content, [[wiki-style links]], linked #tags, and external links:

    ❯ nb browse text:formats/markdown/123
    ❯nb · text : formats / markdown / 123 · ↓ · edit | +
    Daring Fireball: Markdown (daringfireball.net)
    
    https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/
    
    Related
    
      • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown
    
    Comments
    
    See also:
    
      • [[text:formats/org]]
      • [[cli:apps/nb]]
    
    Tags
    
    #markup #plain-text
    
    Content
    
    Daring Fireball: Markdown
    
    Download
    
    Markdown 1.0.1 (18 KB) — 17 Dec 2004
    
    Introduction
    
    Markdown is a text-to-HTML conversion tool for web writers. Markdown allows
    you to write using an easy-to-read, easy-to-write plain text format, then
    convert it to structurally valid XHTML (or HTML).

    For more information, see Browsing.

    nb open (shortcut: nb o) opens the bookmarked URL in your system's primary web browser:

    # open bookmark by id
    nb open 3
    
    # open bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb open example:12
    
    # open bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 open
    
    # open bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:open 12

    nb peek (shortcut: nb p, alias: nb preview) opens the bookmarked URL in your terminal web browser, such as w3m, Links, or Lynx:

    # peek bookmark by id
    nb peek 3
    
    # peek bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb peek example:12
    
    # peek bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 peek
    
    # peek bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:peek 12

    nb open and nb peek subcommands also work seamlessly with encrypted bookmarks. nb will simply prompt you for the bookmark's password.

    nb open and nb peek automatically check whether the URL is still valid. If the page has been removed, nb can check the Internet Archive Wayback Machine for an archived copy.

    The preferred terminal web browser can be set using the $BROWSER environment variable, assigned in ~/.bashrc, ~/.zshrc, or similar:

    export BROWSER=lynx

    When $BROWSER is not set, nb looks for w3m, links, and lynx and uses the first one it finds.

    $BROWSER can also be used to easy specify the terminal browser for an individual command:

    ❯ BROWSER=links nb 12 peek
    # opens the URL from bookmark 12 in links
    
    ❯ BROWSER=w3m nb 12 peek
    # opens the URL from bookmark 12 in w3m

    nb show and nb edit can also be used to view and edit bookmark files, which include the cached page converted to Markdown.

    nb show <id> --render / nb show <id> -r displays the bookmark file converted to HTML in the terminal web browser, including all bookmark fields and the cached page content, providing a cleaned-up, distraction-free, locally-served view of the page content along with all of your notes.

    Shortcut Aliases: nb o and nb p

    nb open and nb peek can also be used with the shortcut aliases nb o and nb p:

    # open bookmark by id
    nb o 3
    
    # open bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb o example:12
    
    # open bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 o
    
    # peek bookmark by id
    nb p 3
    
    # peek bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb p example:12
    
    # peek bookmark 12 in the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb example:12 p

    Bookmark File Format

    Bookmarks are identified by a .bookmark.md file extension. The bookmark URL is the first URL in the file within < and > characters. To create a minimally valid bookmark file with nb add:

    nb add example.bookmark.md --content "<https://example.com>"

    For a full overview, see nb Markdown Bookmark File Format.

    bookmark -- A command line tool for managing bookmarks.

    nb includes bookmark, a full-featured command line interface for creating, viewing, searching, and editing bookmarks.

    bookmark is a shortcut for the nb bookmark subcommand, accepting all of the same subcommands and options with identical behavior.

    Bookmark a page:

    ❯ bookmark https://example.com --tags tag1,tag2
    Added: [3] 🔖 20200101000000.bookmark.md "Example Title (example.com)"

    List and filter bookmarks with bookmark and bookmark list:

    ❯ bookmark
    Add: bookmark <url> Help: bookmark help
    ---------------------------------------
    [3] 🔖 🔒 example.bookmark.md.enc
    [2] 🔖 Example Two (example.com)
    [1] 🔖 Example One (example.com)
    
    ❯ bookmark list two
    [2] 🔖 Example Two (example.com)

    View a bookmark in your terminal web browser:

    bookmark peek 2

    Open a bookmark in your system's primary web browser:

    bookmark open 2

    Perform a full text search of bookmarks and archived page content:

    ❯ bookmark search "example query"
    [10] 🔖 example.bookmark.md "Example Bookmark (example.com)"
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    5:Lorem ipsum example query.

    See bookmark help for more information.

    🏷 #tagging

    ↑ · nb add, nb bookmark, nb browse, nb list, nb ls, nb search

    nb recognizes #hashtags defined anywhere within a document. A hashtag is defined in nb as a # character followed by any number of letters, numbers, underscores, and dashes.

    Notes and bookmarks can be tagged when they are created using the --tags <tag1>,<tag2>... option, which is available with nb add, nb <url>, nb browse add, and nb bookmark. --tags takes a comma-separated list of tags, converts them to #hashtags, and adds them to the document.

    Tags added to notes with nb add --tags are placed between the title and body text:

    ❯ nb add --title "Example Title" "Example note content." --tags tag1,tag2
    # Example Title
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    Example note content.

    Tags added to bookmarks with nb <url> --tags and nb bookmark <url> --tags are placed in a Tags section:

    ❯ nb https://example.com --tags tag1,tag2
    # Example Title (example.com)
    
    <https://example.com>
    
    ## Description
    
    Example description.
    
    ## Tags
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    ## Content
    
    Example Title
    =============
    
    This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
    use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
    permission.
    
    [More information\...](https://www.iana.org/domains/example)

    Use nb --tags, nb ls --tags, and nb list --tags to list the tags present in a notebook, folder, or item:

    # list all tags found in items in the current notebook
    nb --tags
    
    # list all tags found in the folder named "example"
    nb example/ --tags
    
    # list all tags in the item with id 123 in the notebook named "sample"
    nb sample:123 --tags

    Tagged items can be searched with nb search / nb q:

    # search for and list items in any notebook tagged with "#tag1"
    nb search "#tag1" --all --list
    
    # search for and list items in any notebook tagged with "#tag1", shortcut and short options
    nb q "#tag1" -al
    
    # search for items in the current notebook tagged with both "#tag1" AND "#tag2"
    nb q "#tag1" "#tag2"
    
    # search for items in the current notebook tagged with both "#tag1" AND "#tag2", long option
    nb q "#tag1" --and "#tag2"
    
    # search for items in the current notebook tagged with either "#tag1" OR "#tag2"
    nb q "#tag1|#tag2"
    
    # search for items in the current notebook tagged with either "#tag1" OR "#tag2", long option
    nb q "#tag1" --or "#tag2"

    Linked tags can be browsed with nb browse, providing another dimension of browsability in terminal and GUI web browsers, complimenting [[wiki-style linking]].

    Tags in notes, bookmarks, files in text-based formats, Word .docx documents, and Open Document .odt files are rendered as links to the list of items in the notebook sharing that tag:

    ❯nb · example : 321
    
    Example Title
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    Example content with link to [[Sample Title]].
    
    More example content:
    - one
    - two
    - three

    Use the -q / --query option to open nb browse to the list of all items in the current notebook or a specified notebook or folder that share a tag:

    # open to a list of items tagged with "#tag2" in the "example" notebook
    ❯ nb browse example: --query "#tag2"
    ❯nb · example
    
    search: [#tag2               ]
    
    [example:321] Example Title
    [example:654] Sample Title
    [example:789] Demo Title
    
    # shortcut alias and short option
    ❯ nb br example: -q "#tag2"
    ❯nb · example
    
    search: [#tag2               ]
    
    [example:321] Example Title
    [example:654] Sample Title
    [example:789] Demo Title

    For more information about full-text search, see Search and nb search. For more information about browsing, see Browsing and nb browse.

    🔗 Linking

    ↑ · nb browse

    Notes, bookmarks, files in text-based formats, Word .docx documents, and Open Document .odt files can reference other items using [[wiki-style links]], making nb a powerful terminal-first platform for Zettelkasten, wiki-style knowledge mapping, and other link-based note-taking methods.

    To add a link from a note or bookmark to another in the same notebook, include the id, title, or relative path for the target item within double square brackets anywhere in the linking document:

    # link to the item with id 123 in the root level of current notebook
    [[123]]
    
    # link to the item titled "Example Title" in the root level of the current notebook
    [[Example Title]]
    
    # link to the item with id 456 in the folder named "Sample Folder"
    [[Sample Folder/456]]
    
    # link to the item titled "Demo Title" in the folder named "Sample Folder"
    [[Sample Folder/Demo Title]]

    To link to an item in another notebook, add the notebook name with a colon before the identifier:

    # link to the item with id 123 in the "sample" folder in the "example" notebook
    [[example:sample/123]]
    
    # link to the item titled "Example Title" in the "demo" notebook
    [[demo:Example Title]]
    
    # link to the item with filename "Example File.md" in the "sample" notebook
    [[sample:Example File.md]]

    The text for a link can be specified after a pipe | character:

    # render link to item 123 in the "example" notebook as [[Example Link Text]]
    [[example:123|Example Link Text]]

    [[wiki-style links]] cooperate well with Org links, which have a similar syntax, providing a convenient option for linking collections of Org files.

    Linked items can be browsed with nb browse.

    For more information about identifying items, see Selectors.

    🌍 Browsing

    ↑ · nb browse

    Use nb browse (shortcut: nb br) to browse, view, edit, and search linked notes, bookmarks, notebooks, folders, and other items using terminal and GUI web browsers.

    nb browse

    nb browse includes an embedded, terminal-first web application that renders [[wiki-style links]] and #hashtags as internal links, enabling you to browse your notes and notebooks in web browsers, including seamlessly browsing to and from the offsite links in bookmarks and notes.

    ❯ nb browse
    ❯nb · home : +
    
    search: [                    ]
    
    [home:6]  📌 Example Markdown Title
    [home:12] 🔒 example-encrypted.md.enc
    [home:11] 🔖 Example Bookmark (example.com)
    [home:10] 🔖 🔒 example-encrypted.bookmark.md.enc
    [home:9]  Example .org Title
    [home:8]  🌄 example-image.png
    [home:7]  📄 example.pdf
    [home:5]  🔉 example-audio.mp3
    [home:4]  Example LaTeX Title
    [home:3]  📹 example-video.mp4
    [home:2]  example.md
    [home:1]  📂 Example Folder

    Lists are displayed using the same format as nb and nb ls, including pinned items, with each list item linked. Lists are automatically paginated to fit the height of the terminal window.

    ❯ nb browse example:sample/demo/
    ❯nb · example : sample / demo / +
    
    search: [                    ]
    
    [example:sample/demo/7] Title Seven
    [example:sample/demo/6] Title Six
    [example:sample/demo/5] Title Five
    [example:sample/demo/4] Title Four
    [example:sample/demo/3] Title Three
    
    next ❯

    nb browse is designed to make it easy to navigate within terminal web browsers using only keyboard commands, while also supporting mouse interactions. The nb browse interface includes links to quickly jump to parent folders, the current notebook, and other notebooks.

    nb browse opens in w3m (currently the primary terminal reference browser for nb), Links, Lynx, or in the browser set in the $BROWSER environment variable. Use nb browse --gui / nb br -g to open in the system's primary GUI web browser.

    To open a specific item in nb browse, pass the selector for the item, folder, or notebook to nb browse:

    # open the item with id 42 in the folder named "sample" in the "example" notebook
    ❯ nb browse example:sample/42
    ❯nb · example : sample / 42 · ↓ · edit | +
    
    Example Title
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    Example content with link to [[Demo Title]].
    
    More example content:
    
      • one
      • two
      • three

    Items can also be browsed with nb show --browse / nb s -b, which behaves identically.

    nb browse is particularly useful for bookmarks. Cached content is rendered in the web browser along with comments and notes. Internal and external links are easily accessible directly in the terminal, providing a convenient, distraction-free approach for browsing collections of bookmarks.

    ❯ nb browse text:formats/markdown/123
    ❯nb · text : formats / markdown / 123 · ↓ · edit | +
    Daring Fireball: Markdown (daringfireball.net)
    
    https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/
    
    Related
    
      • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown
    
    Comments
    
    See also:
    
      • [[text:formats/org]]
      • [[cli:apps/nb]]
    
    Tags
    
    #markup #plain-text
    
    Content
    
    Daring Fireball: Markdown
    
    Download
    
    Markdown 1.0.1 (18 KB) — 17 Dec 2004
    
    Introduction
    
    Markdown is a text-to-HTML conversion tool for web writers. Markdown allows
    you to write using an easy-to-read, easy-to-write plain text format, then
    convert it to structurally valid XHTML (or HTML).

    Notes, bookmarks, files in text-based formats, source code, Word .docx documents, and Open Document .odt files are converted into HTML and rendered in the browser. Use the down arrow () link to view or download the original file.

    browse edit

    nb browse edit

    Items in text formats can be edited within terminal and GUI web browsers using the edit link on the item page or by opening the item with nb browse edit / nb br e, which automatically resizes the form to fit the current terminal window:

    ❯ nb browse edit text:formats/markdown/123
    ❯nb · text : formats / markdown / 123 · ↓ · editing · - | +
    
    [# Daring Fireball: Markdown (daringfireball.net)         ]
    [                                                         ]
    [<https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/>          ]
    [                                                         ]
    [## Related                                               ]
    [                                                         ]
    [- <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown>               ]
    [                                                         ]
    [## Comments                                              ]
    [                                                         ]
    [See also:                                                ]
    [                                                         ]
    [- [[text:formats/org]]                                   ]
    [- [[cli:apps/nb]]                                        ]
    [                                                         ]
    [## Tags                                                  ]
    [                                                         ]
    
    [save] · last: 2021-01-01 01:00:00

    Syntax highlighting, block selection, and other advanced editor features are available with nb browse --gui.

    browse add

    Add an item within the browser using the + link or nb browse add / nb br a. Pass a notebook, folder, and / or filename selector to create a new note in that location:

    ❯ nb browse add text:formats/
    ❯nb · text : formats / +
    
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    
    [add]

    nb browse add includes options for quickly pre-populating new notes with content:

    ❯ nb browse add --title "Example Title" --content "Example content." --tags tag1,tag2
    ❯nb · home : +
    
    [# Example Title                                    ]
    [                                                   ]
    [#tag1 #tag2                                        ]
    [                                                   ]
    [Example content.                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    [                                                   ]
    
    [add]

    browse delete

    Use the - link on the nb browse edit page or nb browse delete / nb br d to delete an item:

    ❯ nb browse delete example:4
    ❯nb · example : 4 · ↓ · edit · - | +
    
                  deleting
    
    [4] example_file.md "Example Title"
    
                  [delete]
    
    

    browse Search

    nb browse includes a search field powered by nb search that can be used to search the current notebook or folder. Search queries are treated as command line arguments for nb search, providing the ability to perform AND and OR queries. Use the -q / --query option to open nb browse to the results page for a search:

    # open to a list of items tagged with "#tag2" in the "example" notebook
    ❯ nb browse --query "#tag2"
    ❯nb · example
    
    search: [#tag2               ]
    
    [home:321] Example Title
    [home:654] Sample Title
    [home:789] Demo Title
    
    # using shortcut alias and short option
    ❯ nb br -q "#tag2"
    ❯nb · example
    
    search: [#tag2               ]
    
    [home:321] Example Title
    [home:654] Sample Title
    [home:789] Demo Title

    For more information about search options, see Search and nb search.

    browse --gui

    To open any nb browse view in the system's primary GUI web browser, add the nb browse --gui / nb br -g option:

    # open the item with id 123 in the "sample" notebook in the system's primary GUI browser
    nb browse sample:123 --gui
    
    # open the folder named "example" in the system's primary GUI browser,
    # short option
    nb browse example/ -g
    
    # open the current notebook in the system's primary GUI browser,
    # shortcut alias and short option
    nb br -g
    browse --gui Editing

    By default, nb browse --gui uses the browser's default <textarea> for editing items.

    Ace is a text editor for GUI web browsers that provides advanced text editing functionality, including block selection and syntax highlighting.

    To use Ace as the editor for nb browse --gui, add the following line to your ~/.nbrc file:

    export NB_ACE_ENABLED=1

    The next time a form is loaded in nb browse, nb will automatically download (from GitHub), install, and enable the Ace editor in nb browse edit --gui and nb browse add --gui.

    browse Portability

    nb browse depends on ncat, which is available as part of the ncat or nmap package in most package managers, and pandoc. When only pandoc is available, the current note is rendered and [[wiki-style links]] go to unrendered, original files. If only ncat is available, files in plain text formats are rendered with the original markup unconverted. If neither ncat nor pandoc is available, nb browse falls back to the default behavior of nb show.

    browse Privacy

    nb browse is completely local and self-contained within nb, from the CSS and vanilla JavaScript all the way down through the HTTP request parsing and response building, with no imports, libraries, frameworks, or third-party code outside of the few binary dependencies (bash, git, ncat, pandoc), the Linux / Unix environment, and the optional Ace editor.

    Terminal web browsers don't use JavaScript, so visits from them are not visible to some web analytics tools. nb browse includes a number of additional features to enhance privacy and avoid leaking information:

    • Page content is cached locally within each bookmark file, making it readable in terminal and GUI web browsers without requesting the page again or needing to be connected to the internet.
    • <img> tags in bookmarked content are removed to avoid requests.
    • Outbound links are automatically rewritten to use an exit page redirect to mitigate leaking information via the referer header.
    • All pages include the <meta name="referrer" content="no-referrer" /> tag.
    • Links include a rel="noopener noreferrer" attribute.
    • lynx is opened with the -noreferer option.

    Shortcut Alias: nb br

    nb browse can also be used with the alias nb br:

    # open the current notebook in the terminal web browser
    nb br
    
    # open the item with id 123 in the "example" notebook using the terminal web browser
    nb br example:123
    
    # open the notebook named "sample" in the GUI web browser
    nb br sample: -g

    For more information, see nb browse.

    🗂 Zettelkasten

    ↑ 

    Zettelkasten (German: "slip box") is a method of note-taking and personal knowledge management modeled around a few key features:

    • Notes are taken liberally on index cards.
    • Each note is numbered for easy reference.
    • Index cards are organized into boxes.
    • Index cards can reference other index cards.
    • Cards can include tags and other metadata.

    Since nb works directly on plain text files organized in normal system directories in normal git repositories, nb is a very close digital analogue to physical zettelkasten note-taking.

    Zettelkasten nb
    index cards notes & bookmarks
    numbering ids & selectors
    slip boxes notebooks
    tags #tags
    metadata front matter
    cross-references [[wiki-style links]]
    fast note-taking nb add / nb a

    For more information about Zettelkasten, see Wikipedia.

    📂 Folders

    ↑ 

    Items can be organized in folders. To add a note to a folder, call nb add with the folder's relative path within the notebook followed by a slash:

    # add a new note in the folder named "example"
    nb add example/
    
    # add a new note in the folder named "demo" in "example"
    nb add example/demo/

    nb automatically creates any intermediate folders as needed.

    Folders can be created directly using nb add --type folder:

    # create a new folder named "sample"
    nb add sample --type folder
    
    # create a folder named "example" containing a folder named "demo"
    nb add example/demo --type folder

    To list the items in a folder, pass the folder relative path to nb, nb ls, nb list, or nb browse with a trailing slash:

    ❯ nb example/demo/
    home
    ----
    [example/demo/3] Title Three
    [example/demo/2] Title Two
    [example/demo/1] Title One

    Folders can also be identified by the folder's id and listed with a trailing slash:

    ❯ nb list
    [1] 📂 example
    
    ❯ nb list 1/
    [example/2] 📂 demo
    [example/1] document.md
    
    ❯ nb list 1/2/
    [example/demo/3] Title Three
    [example/demo/2] Title Two
    [example/demo/1] Title One

    Items in folders can be idenitified with the folder's relative path using either folder ids or names, followed by the id, title, or filename of the item:

    # list item 1 ("Title One", one.md) in the example/demo/ folder
    nb list example/demo/1
    
    # edit item 1 ("Title One", one.md) in the example/demo/ folder
    nb edit example/2/one.md
    
    # show item 1 ("Title One", one.md) in the example/demo/ folder
    nb show 1/2/Title\ One
    
    # delete item 1 ("Title One", one.md) in the example/demo/ folder
    nb delete 1/demo/1

    For folders and items in other notebooks, combine the relative path with the notebook name, separated by a colon:

    # list the contents of the "sample" folder in the "example" notebook
    nb example:sample/
    
    # add an item to the "sample/demo" folder in the "example" notebook
    nb add example:sample/demo/
    
    # edit item 3 in the "sample/demo" folder in the "example" notebook
    nb edit example:sample/demo/3

    Browse starting at any folder with nb browse:

    ❯ nb browse example:sample/demo/
    ❯nb · example : sample / demo /
    
    search: [                    ]
    
    [example:sample/demo/5] Title Five
    [example:sample/demo/4] Title Four
    [example:sample/demo/3] Title Three
    [example:sample/demo/2] Title Two
    [example:sample/demo/1] Title One

    For more information about identifying folders, see Selectors.

    📌 Pinning

    ↑ · nb pin, nb unpin, nb ls, nb browse

    Items can be pinned so they appear first in nb, nb ls, and nb browse:

    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [2] 📌 Title Two
    [5] Title Five
    [4] Title Four
    [3] Title Three
    [1] Title One

    Use nb pin and nb unpin to pin and unpin items:

    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [5] Title Five
    [4] Title Four
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two
    [1] Title One
    
    ❯ nb pin 4
    Pinned: [4] four.md "Title Four"
    
    ❯ nb pin 1
    Pinned: [1] one.md "Title One"
    
    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [4] 📌 Title Four
    [1] 📌 Title One
    [5] Title Five
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two
    
    ❯ nb unpin 4
    Unpinned: [4] four.md "Title Four"
    
    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [1] 📌 Title One
    [5] Title Five
    [4] Title Four
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two

    nb can also be configured to pin notes that contain a specified #hashtag or other search pattern. To enable tag / search-based pinning, set the $NB_PINNED_PATTERN environment variable to the desired #tag or pattern.

    For example, to treat all items tagged with #pinned as pinned items, add the following line to your ~/.nbrc file, which can be opened in your editor with nb settings edit:

    export NB_PINNED_PATTERN="#pinned"

    All indicator icons in nb can be customized, so to use a different character as the pindicator, simply add a line like the following to your ~/.nbrc file:

    export NB_INDICATOR_PINNED="💖"
    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [1] 💖 Title One
    [5] Title Five
    [4] Title Four
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two

    🔍 Search

    ↑ · nb search

    Use nb search (shortcut: nb q) to perform full text searches, with support for regular expressions, #tags, and both AND and OR queries:

    # search current notebook for "example query"
    nb search "example query"
    
    # search the notebook "example" for "example query"
    nb search example: "example query"
    
    # search the folder named "demo" for "example query"
    nb search demo/ "example query"
    
    # search all unarchived notebooks for "example query" and list matching items
    nb search "example query" --all --list
    
    # search for "example" AND "demo" with multiple arguments
    nb search "example" "demo"
    
    # search for "example" AND "demo" with option
    nb search "example" --and "demo"
    
    # search for "example" OR "sample" with argument
    nb search "example|sample"
    
    # search for "example" OR "sample" with option
    nb search "example" --or "sample"
    
    # search items containing the hashtag "#example"
    nb search "#example"
    
    # search with a regular expression
    nb search "\d\d\d-\d\d\d\d"
    
    # search bookmarks for "example"
    nb search "example" --type bookmark
    
    # search bookmarks for "example", alternative
    nb bk q "example"
    
    # search the current notebook for "example query"
    nb q "example query"
    
    # search the notebook named "example" for "example query"
    nb q example: "example query"
    
    # search all unarchived notebooks for "example query" and list matching items
    nb q -la "example query"

    nb search prints the id number, filename, and title of each matched file, followed by each search query match and its line number, with color highlighting:

    ❯ nb search "example"
    [314]  🔖 example.bookmark.md "Example Bookmark (example.com)"
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    1:# Example Bookmark (example.com)
    
    3:<https://example.com>
    
    [2718] example.md "Example Note"
    --------------------------------
    1:# Example Note

    To just print the note information line without the content matches, use the -l or --list option:

    ❯ nb search "example" --list
    [314]  🔖 example.bookmark.md "Example Bookmark (example.com)"
    [2718] example.md "Example Note"

    Multiple query arguments are treated as AND queries, returning items that match all queries. AND queries can also be specified with the --and <query> option:

    # search for items tagged with "#example" AND "#demo" AND "#sample" using
    # multiple arguments
    nb q "#example" "#demo" "#sample"
    
    # options
    nb q "#example" --and "#demo" --and "#sample"

    nb matches AND query terms regardless of where they appear in a document, an improvement over most approaches for performing AND queries with command line tools, which typically only match terms appearing on the same line.

    OR queries return items that match at least one of the queries and can be created by separating terms in a single argument with a pipe character | or with the --or <query> option:

    # search for "example" OR "sample" with argument
    nb q "example|sample"
    
    # search for "example" OR "sample" with option
    nb q "example" --or "sample"

    --or and --and queries can be used together:

    nb q "example" --or "sample" --and "demo"
    # equivalent: example|sample AND demo|sample

    nb search leverages Git's powerful built-in git grep. nb also supports performing searches with alternative search tools using the --utility <name> option.

    Supported alternative search tools:

    Shortcut Alias: nb q

    nb search can also be used with the alias nb q (for "query"):

    # search for "example" and print matching excerpts
    nb q "example"
    
    # search for "example" and list each matching file
    nb q -l "example"
    
    # search for "example" in all unarchived notebooks
    nb q -a "example"
    
    # search for "example" in the notbook named "sample"
    nb sample:q "example"

    For more information about search, see nb help search.

    Searching with browse

    Searches can be performed within terminal and GUI web browsers using nb browse --query / nb br -q:

    ❯ nb browse --query "#example"
    ❯nb · home : +
    
    search: [#example             ]
    
    [home:7]   Title Seven
    [home:32]  Title Thirty-Two
    [home:56]  Title Fifty-Six
    [home:135] Title One Hundred and Thirty-Five

    For more information, see Browsing.

    Moving & Renaming

    ↑ · nb move

    Use nb move (alias: nb rename, shortcut: nb mv) to move and rename items:

    # move "example.md" to "sample.org"
    nb move example.md sample.org
    
    # rename note 2 ("example.md") to "New Name.md"
    nb rename 2 "New Name"

    Items can be moved between notebooks and folders:

    # move note 12 from the "example" notebook into "Sample Folder" in the "demo" notebook
    nb move example:12 demo:Sample\ Folder/

    When the file extension is omitted, the existing extension is used:

    # rename "example.bookmark.md" to "New Name.bookmark.md"
    nb move example.bookmark.md "New Name"

    When only a file extension is specified, only the extension is updated:

    # change the file extension of note 5 ("demo file.md") to .org ("demo file.org")
    nb rename 5 .org

    Use rename --to-bookmark to change the extension of a note to .bookmark.md and rename --to-note to change the extension of a bookmark to either .md or the extension set with nb set default_extension:

    # rename note 3 ("example.md") to a bookmark named "example.bookmark.md"
    nb rename 3 --to-bookmark
    
    # rename bookmark 6 ("sample.bookmark.md") to a note named "sample.md"
    nb rename 6 --to-note

    Use rename --to-title to set the filename to the note title, lowercased with spaces and disallowed filename characters replaced with underscores:

    ❯ nb rename 12 --to-title
    Moving:   [12] 20210101010000.md "Example Title"
    To:       example_title.md
    Proceed?  [y/N]

    For details, see nb help move.

    To copy items, install the copy / duplicate plugin.

    🗒 Revision History

    ↑ · nb history, nb notebooks author

    Whenever a note is added, modified, or deleted, nb automatically commits the change to git transparently in the background.

    Use nb history to view the revision history of any notebook, folder, or item:

    # show history for current notebook
    nb history
    
    # show history for note number 4
    nb history 4
    
    # show history for note with filename example.md
    nb history example.md
    
    # show history for note titled "Example"
    nb history Example
    
    # show history for the notebook named "example"
    nb example:history
    
    # show history for the notebook named "example", alternative
    nb history example:
    
    # show the history for note 12 in the notebook named "example"
    nb history example:12

    nb history uses git log by default and prefers tig when available.

    Authorship

    By default, git commits are attributed to the email and name configured in your global git configuration.

    Change the email and name used for a notebook with nb notebooks author:

    # edit the commit author email and name for the current notebook
    ❯ nb notebooks author
    Current configuration for: home
    --------------------------
    email (global): example@example.test
    name  (global): Example Name
    
    Update?  [y/N]
    
    # edit the commit author email and name for the notebook named "example"
    ❯ nb notebooks author example
    Current configuration for: example
    --------------------------
    email (global): example@example.test
    name  (global): Example Name
    
    Update?  [y/N]

    The updated author email and name applies to subsequent commits.

    To use a different email and name from the beginning of a notebook's history, create the new notebook using nb notebooks add --author or nb notebooks init --author.

    📚 Notebooks

    ↑ · nb notebooks, nb archive, nb unarchive, nb use

    You can create additional notebooks, each of which has its own version history.

    Create a new notebook with nb notebooks add:

    # add a notebook named example
    nb notebooks add example

    nb and nb ls list the available notebooks above the list of notes:

    ❯ nb
    example · home
    --------------
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two
    [1] Title One

    Commands in nb run within the current notebook, and identifiers such as ids, filenames, and titles refer to notes within the current notebook. nb edit 3, for example, tells nb to edit note with id 3 within the current notebook.

    To switch to a different notebook, use nb use:

    # switch to the notebook named "example"
    nb use example

    If you are in one notebook and you want to perform a command in a different notebook without switching to it, add the notebook name with a colon before the command name:

    # add a new note in the notebook "example"
    nb example:add
    
    # add a new note in the notebook "example", shortcut alias
    nb example:a
    
    # show note 5 in the notebook "example"
    nb example:show 5
    
    # show note 5 in the notebook "example", shortcut alias
    nb example:s 5
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook "example"
    nb example:edit 12
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook "example", shortcut alias
    nb example:e 12
    
    # search for "example query" in the notebook "example"
    nb example:search "example query"
    
    # search for "example query" in the notebook "example", shortcut alias
    nb example:q "example query"
    
    # show the revision history of the notebook "example"
    nb example:history

    The notebook name with colon can also be used as a modifier to the id, filename, or title:

    # edit note 12 in the notebook "example"
    nb edit example:12
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook "example", shortcut alias
    nb e example:12
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook "example", alternative
    nb example:12 edit
    
    # edit note 12 in the notebook "example", alternative, shortcut alias
    nb example:12 e
    
    # show note titled "misc" in the notebook "example"
    nb show example:misc
    
    # show note titled "misc" in the notebook "example", shortcut alias
    nb s example:misc
    
    # delete note with filename "todos.md" in the notebook "example", alternative
    nb example:todos.md delete
    
    # delete note with filename "todos.md" in the notebook "example", alternative,
    # shortcut alias
    nb example:todos.md d

    When a notebook name with colon is called without a subcommand, nb runs nb ls in the specified notebook:

    ❯ nb example:
    example · home
    --------------
    [example:3] Title Three
    [example:2] Title Two
    [example:1] Title One

    A bookmark can be created in another notebook by specifying the notebook name with colon, then a space, then the URL and bookmark options:

    # create a new bookmark in a notebook named "sample"
    ❯ nb sample: https://example.com --tags tag1,tag2

    Notes can also be moved between notebooks:

    # move note 3 from the current notebook to "example"
    nb move 3 example:
    
    # move note 5 in the notebook "example" to the notebook "sample"
    nb move example:5 sample:
    Example Workflow

    The flexibility of nb's argument handling makes it easy to build commands step by step as items are listed, filtered, viewed, and edited, particularly in combination with shell history:

    # list items in the "example" notebook
    ❯ nb example:
    example · home
    --------------
    [example:3] Title Three
    [example:2] Title Two
    [example:1] Title One
    
    # filter list
    ❯ nb example: three
    [example:3] Title Three
    
    # view item
    ❯ nb example:3 show
    # opens item in `less`
    
    # edit item
    ❯ nb example:3 edit
    # opens item in $EDITOR
    Notebooks and Tab Completion

    nb tab completion is optimized for frequently running commands in various notebooks using the colon syntax, so installing the completion scripts is recommended and makes working with notebooks easy, fluid, and fun.

    For example, listing the contents of a notebook is usually as simple as typing the first two or three characters of the name, then pressing the <tab> key, then pressing <enter>:

    ❯ nb exa<tab>
    # completes to "example:"
    ❯ nb example:
    example · home
    --------------
    [example:3] Title Three
    [example:2] Title Two
    [example:1] Title One

    Scoped notebook commands are also available in tab completion:

    ❯ nb exa<tab>
    # completes to "example:"
    ❯ nb example:hi<tab>
    # completes to "example:history"

    Notebooks, Tags, and Taxonomy

    nb is optimized to work well with a bunch of notebooks, so notebooks are a good way to organize notes and bookmarks by top-level topic.

    #tags are searchable across notebooks and can be created ad hoc, making notebooks and tags distinct and complementary organizational systems in nb.

    Search for a tag in or across notebooks with nb search / nb q:

    # search for #tag in the current notebook
    nb q "#tag"
    
    # search for #tag in all notebooks
    nb q "#tag" -a
    
    # search for #tag in the "example" notebook
    nb q example: "#tag"

    Global and Local Notebooks

    Global Notebooks

    By default, all nb notebooks are global, making them always accessible in the terminal regardless of the current working directory. Global notebooks are stored in the directory configured in nb set nb_dir, which is ~/.nb by default.

    Local Notebooks

    nb also supports creating and working with local notebooks. Local notebooks are notebooks that are anywhere on the system outside of NB_DIR. Any folder can be an nb local notebook, which is just a normal folder that has been initialized as a git repository and contains an nb .index file. Initializing a folder as an nb local notebook is a very easy way to add structured git versioning to any folder of documents and other files.

    When nb runs within a local notebook, the local notebook is set as the current notebook:

    ❯ nb
    local · example · home
    ----------------------
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two
    [1] Title One

    A local notebook is always referred to by the name local and otherwise behaves just like a global notebook whenever a command is run from within it:

    # add a new note in the local notebook
    nb add
    
    # edit note 15 in the local notebook
    nb edit 15
    
    # move note titled "Todos" from the home notebook to the local notebook
    nb move home:Todos local:
    
    # move note 1 from the local notebook to the home notebook
    nb move 1 home:
    
    # search the local notebook for <query string>
    nb search "query string"
    
    # search the local notebook and all unarchived global notebooks for <query string>
    nb search "query string" --all

    Local notebooks can be created with nb notebooks init:

    # initialize the current directory as a notebook
    nb notebooks init
    
    # create a new notebook at ~/example
    nb notebooks init ~/example
    
    # clone an existing notebook to ~/example
    nb notebooks init ~/example https://github.com/example/example.git

    Local notebooks can also be created by exporting a global notebook:

    # export global notebook named "example" to "../path/to/destination"
    nb notebooks export example ../path/to/destination
    
    # alternative
    nb export example ../path/to/destination

    Local notebooks can also be imported, making them global:

    # import notebook or folder at "../path/to/notebook"
    nb notebooks import ../path/to/notebook
    
    # alternative
    nb import ../path/to/notebook

    nb notebooks init and nb notebooks import can be used together to easily turn any directory of existing files into a global nb notebook:

    ❯ ls
    example-directory
    
    ❯ nb notebooks init example-directory
    Initialized local notebook: /home/username/example-directory
    
    ❯ nb notebooks import example-directory
    Imported notebook: example-directory
    
    ❯ nb notebooks
    example-directory
    home

    Archiving Notebooks

    Notebooks can be archived using nb archive (shortcut: nb ar):

    # archive the current notebook
    nb archive
    
    # archive the notebook named "example"
    nb archive example
    
    # archive the current notebook, shortcut alias
    nb ar
    
    # archive the notebook named "example", shortcut alias
    nb ar example

    When a notebook is archived it is not included in nb / nb ls output, nb search --all, or tab completion, nor synced automatically with nb sync --all.

    ❯ nb
    example1 · example2 · example3 · [1 archived]
    ---------------------------------------------
    [3] Title Three
    [2] Title Two
    [1] Title One

    Archived notebooks can still be used individually using normal notebook commands:

    # switch the current notebook to the archived notebook "example"
    nb use example
    
    # run the `list` subcommand in the archived notebook "example"
    nb example:list

    Check a notebook's archival status with nb status (shortcut: nb st) and nb notebooks status:

    # print status information, including archival status, for the current notebook
    nb status
    
    # print status information, including archival status, for the notebook named "example"
    nb status example
    
    # print status information, including archival status, for the current notebook,
    # shortcut alias
    nb st
    
    # print status information, including archival status, for the notebook named "example",
    # shortcut alias
    nb st example
    
    # print the archival status of the current notebook
    nb notebooks status
    
    # print the archival status of the notebook named "example"
    nb notebooks status example

    Use nb unarchive (shortcut: nb unar) to unarchive a notebook:

    # unarchive the current notebook
    nb unarchive
    
    # unarchive the notebook named "example"
    nb unarchive example

    For more information about working with notebooks, see nb help notebooks, nb help archive, and nb help unarchive.

    For technical details about notebooks, see nb Notebook Specification.

    🔄 Git Sync

    ↑ · nb remote, nb sync

    Each notebook can be synced with a remote git repository by setting the remote URL using nb remote:

    # set the current notebook's remote to a private GitHub repository
    nb remote set https://github.com/example/example
    
    # set the remote for the notebook named "example"
    nb example:remote set https://github.com/example/example

    Any notebook with a remote URL will sync automatically every time a command is run in that notebook.

    When you use nb on multiple systems, you can set a notebook on each system to the same remote and nb will keep everything in sync in the background every time there's a change in that notebook.

    Since each notebook has its own git history, you can have some notebooks syncing with remotes while other notebooks are only available locally on that system.

    Many services provide free private git repositories, so git syncing with nb is easy, free, and vendor-independent. You can also sync your notes using Dropbox, Drive, Box, Syncthing, or another syncing tool by changing your nb directory with nb set nb_dir <path>, and git syncing will still work simultaneously.

    Clone an existing notebook by passing the URL to nb notebooks add:

    # create a new notebook named "example" cloned from a private GitLab repository
    nb notebooks add example https://gitlab.com/example/example.git

    Turn off syncing for a notebook by removing the remote:

    # remove the remote from the current notebook
    nb remote remove
    
    # remove the remote from the notebook named "example"
    nb example:remote remove

    Automatic git syncing can be turned on or off with nb set auto_sync.

    To sync manually, use nb sync:

    # manually sync the current notebook
    nb sync
    
    # manually sync the notebook named "example"
    nb example:sync

    To bypass nb syncing and run git commands directly within a notebook, use nb git:

    # run `git fetch` in the current notebook
    nb git fetch origin
    
    # run `git status` in the notebook named "example"
    nb example:git status

    Syncing Multiple Notebooks with One Remote

    Multiple notebooks can be synced to one remote using orphan branches. An orphan branch is a branch with a history that is independent from the repository's main, master, or equivalent primary branch history. To sync a notebook with a new orphan branch, add the remote using nb remote set and select the option to create a new orphan branch. The name of orphan branch is derived from notebook name and can alternatively be specified as an argument to nb remote set:

    # set the remote for the current notebook to a remote URL and branch
    nb remote set https://github.com/xwmx/example demo-branch

    To create a notebook using an existing orphan branch on a remote, pass the branch name to nb init, nb notebooks add, or nb notebooks init after the URL:

    # initialize new "home" notebook with the branch "sample-branch" on the remote
    nb init https://github.com/xwmx/example sample-branch
    
    # add a new "example" notebook from the branch "example-branch" on the remote
    nb notebooks add example https://github.com/xwmx/example example-branch

    To list all branches on a remote, use nb remote branches:

    # list all branches on the current remote
    nb remote branches
    
    # list all branches on a remote repository identified by a URL
    nb remote branches "https://github.com/xwmx/example"

    For information about assigning remotes, see nb help remote.

    Private Repositories and Git Credentials

    Syncing with private repositories requires configuring git to not prompt for credentials. For repositories cloned over HTTPS, credentials can be cached with git . For repositories cloned over SSH, keys can be added to the ssh-agent .

    Use nb sync within a notebook to determine whether your configuration is working. If nb sync displays a password prompt, then follow the instructions above to configure your credentials. The password prompt can be used to authenticate, but nb does not cache or otherwise handle git credentials in any way, so there will likely be multiple password prompts during each sync if credentials are not configured.

    Sync Conflict Resolution

    nb handles git operations automatically, so you shouldn't ever need to use the git command line tool directly. nb merges changes when syncing and handles conflicts using a couple different strategies.

    When nb sync encounters a conflict in a text file and can't cleanly merge overlapping local and remote changes, nb saves both versions within the file separated by git conflict markers and prints a message indicating which files contain conflicting text. Use nb edit to remove the conflict markers and delete any unwanted text.

    For example, in the following file, the second list item was changed on two systems, and git has no way to determine which one we want to keep:

    # Example Title
    
    - List Item apple
    <<<<<<< HEAD
    - List Item apricot
    =======
    - List Item pluot
    >>>>>>> 719od01... [nb] Commit
    - List Item plum
    

    The local change is between the lines starting with <<<<<<< and =======, while the remote change is between the ======= and >>>>>>> lines.

    To resolve this conflict by keeping both items, simply edit the file with nb edit and remove the lines starting with <<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>>:

    # Example Title
    
    - List Item apple
    - List Item apricot
    - List Item pluot
    - List Item plum
    

    When nb encounters a conflict in a binary file, such as an encrypted note, both versions of the file are saved in the notebook as individual files, with --conflicted-copy appended to the filename of the version from the remote. To resolve a conflicted copy of a binary file, compare both versions and merge them manually, then delete the --conflicted-copy.

    If you do encounter a conflict that nb says it can't merge at all, nb git and nb run can be used to perform git and shell operations within the notebook to resolve the conflict manually. Please also open an issue with any relevant details that could inform a strategy for handling any such cases automatically.

    ↕️ Import / Export

    ↑ · nb import, nb export

    Files of any type can be imported into a notebook using nb import. nb edit and nb open will open files in your system's default application for that file type.

    # import an image file
    nb import ~/Pictures/example.png
    
    # open image in your default image viewer
    nb open example.png
    
    # import a .docx file
    nb import ~/Documents/example.docx
    
    # open .docx file in Word or your system's .docx viewer
    nb open example.docx

    Multiple filenames and globbing are supported:

    # import all files and directories in the current directory
    nb import ./*
    
    # import all markdown files in the current directory
    nb import ./*.md
    
    # import example.md and sample.md in the current directory
    nb import example.md sample.md

    nb import can also download and import files directly from the web:

    # import a PDF file from the web
    nb import https://example.com/example.pdf
    # Imported "https://example.com/example.pdf" to "example.pdf"
    
    # open example.pdf in your system's PDF viewer
    nb open example.pdf

    Some imported file types have indicators to make them easier to identify in lists:

    ❯ nb
    home
    ----
    [6] 📖 example-ebook.epub
    [5] 🌄 example-picture.png
    [4] 📄 example-document.docx
    [3] 📹 example-video.mp4
    [2] 🔉 example-audio.mp3
    [1] 📂 Example Folder

    Notes, bookmarks, and other files can be exported using nb export. If Pandoc is installed, notes can be automatically converted to any of the formats supported by Pandoc. By default, the output format is determined by the file extension:

    # export a Markdown note to a .docx Microsoft Office Word document
    nb export example.md /path/to/example.docx
    
    # export a note titled "Movies" to an HTML web page.
    nb export Movies /path/to/example.html

    For more control over the pandoc options, use the nb export pandoc subcommand:

    # export note 42 as an epub with pandoc options
    nb export pandoc 42 --from markdown_strict --to epub -o path/to/example.epub

    nb export notebook and nb import notebook can be used to export and import notebooks:

    # export global notebook named "example" to "../path/to/destination"
    nb export notebook example ../path/to/destination
    
    # import notebook or folder at "../path/to/notebook"
    nb import notebook ../path/to/notebook

    nb export notebook and nb import notebook behave like aliases for nb notebooks export and nb notebooks import, and the subcommands can be used interchangeably.

    For more information about imported and exported notebooks, see Global and Local Notebooks.

    For nb import and nb export help information, see nb help import and nb help export.

    ⚙️ set & settings

    ↑ · nb settings, nb unset

    nb set and nb settings open the settings prompt, which provides an easy way to change your nb settings.

    nb set

    To update a setting in the prompt, enter the setting name or number and then enter the new value. nb will add the setting to your ~/.nbrc configuration file.

    Example: editor

    nb can be configured to use a specific command line editor using the editor setting.

    The settings prompt for a setting can be started by passing the setting name or number to nb set:

    ❯ nb set editor
    [6]  editor
         ------
         The command line text editor used by `nb`.
    
         • Example Values:
    
             atom
             code
             emacs
             macdown
             mate
             micro
             nano
             pico
             subl
             vi
             vim
    
    EDITOR is currently set to vim
    
    Enter a new value, unset to set to the default value, or q to quit.
    Value:

    A setting can also be updated without the prompt by passing both the name and value to nb set:

    # set editor with setting name
    ❯ nb set editor code
    EDITOR set to code
    
    # set editor with setting number (6)
    ❯ nb set 6 code
    EDITOR set to code
    
    # set the color theme to blacklight
    ❯ nb set color_theme blacklight
    NB_COLOR_THEME set to blacklight
    
    # set the default `ls` limit to 10
    ❯ nb set limit 10
    NB_LIMIT set to 10

    Use nb settings get to print the value of a setting:

    ❯ nb settings get editor
    code
    
    ❯ nb settings get 6
    code

    Use nb unset or nb settings unset to unset a setting and revert to the default:

    ❯ nb unset editor
    EDITOR restored to the default: vim
    
    ❯ nb settings get editor
    vim

    nb set and nb settings are aliases that refer to the same subcommand, so the two subcommand names can be used interchangably.

    For more information about set and settings, see nb help settings and nb settings list --long.

    🎨 Color Themes

    ↑ · nb set color_theme, nb set syntax_theme, nb set color_primary, nb set color_secondary

    nb uses color to highlight various interface elements, including ids and selectors, the current notebook name, the shell prompt, divider lines, syntax elements, and links.

    nb includes several built-in color themes and also supports user-defined themes. The current color theme can be set using nb set color_theme:

    nb set color_theme

    Built-in Color Themes

    blacklight
    blacklight blacklight
    console
    console console
    desert
    desert desert
    electro
    electro electro
    forest
    forest forest
    nb (default)
    nb nb
    ocean
    ocean ocean
    raspberry
    raspberry raspberry
    smoke
    smoke smoke
    unicorn
    unicorn unicorn
    utility
    utility utility

    Custom Color Themes

    Color themes are nb plugins with a .nb-theme file extension. .nb-theme files are expected to contain one if statement testing for the theme name and setting the color environment variables to tput ANSI color numbers:

    # turquoise.nb-theme
    if [[ "${NB_COLOR_THEME}" == "turquoise" ]]
    then
      export NB_COLOR_PRIMARY=43
      export NB_COLOR_SECONDARY=38
    fi

    View this theme as a complete file: plugins/turquoise.nb-theme

    Themes can be installed using nb plugins:

    ❯ nb plugins install https://github.com/xwmx/nb/blob/master/plugins/turquoise.nb-theme
    Plugin installed:
    /home/example/.nb/.plugins/turquoise.nb-theme

    Once a theme is installed, use nb set color_theme to set it as the current theme:

    ❯ nb set color_theme turquoise
    NB_COLOR_THEME set to turquoise

    The primary and secondary colors can also be overridden individually, making color themes easily customizable:

    # open the settings prompt for the primary color
    nb set color_primary
    
    # open the settings prompt for the secondary color
    nb set color_secondary

    To view a table of available colors and numbers, run:

    nb set colors

    Terminal Syntax Highlighting Theme

    nb displays files with syntax highlighting when bat, highlight, or Pygments is installed.

    When bat is installed, syntax highlighting color themes are available for both light and dark terminal backgrounds. To view a list of available themes and set the syntax highlighting color theme, use nb set syntax_theme.

    GUI Web Syntax Highlighting

    Syntax highlighting is also available when viewing and editing items in text formats with nb browse --gui, which incorporates the color theme's primary color into the syntax theme:

    nb syntax highlighting

    Indicators

    nb uses emoji characters to represent information about files in lists. These characters are referred to internally as "indicators" and can be customized by assigning a different character to the indicator's environment variable in your ~/.nbrc file, which can be opened with nb settings edit.

    For example, to use a different indicator for pinned items, add a line like the following to your ~/.nbrc file:

    export NB_INDICATOR_PINNED=""

    To turn off an indicator, assign the variable to an empty string:

    export NB_INDICATOR_TODO=""

    Available indicator variables with default values:

    export  NB_INDICATOR_AUDIO="🔉"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_BOOKMARK="🔖"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_DOCUMENT="📄"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_EBOOK="📖"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_ENCRYPTED="🔒"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_FOLDER="📂"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_IMAGE="🌄"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_PINNED="📌"
    export  NB_INDICATOR_TODO=""
    export  NB_INDICATOR_VIDEO="📹"

    $ Shell Theme Support

    • astral Zsh Theme - Displays the current notebook name in the context line of the prompt.

    🔌 Plugins

    ↑ · nb plugins

    nb includes support for plugins, which can be used to create new subcommands, design themes, and otherwise extend the functionality of nb.

    nb supports two types of plugins, identified by their file extensions:

    .nb-theme
    Plugins defining color themes.
    .nb-plugin
    Plugins defining new subcommands and adding functionality.

    Plugins are managed with the nb plugins subcommand and are installed in the ${NB_DIR}/.plugins directory.

    Plugins can be installed from either a URL or a path using the nb plugins install subcommand.

    # install a plugin from a URL
    nb plugins install https://raw.githubusercontent.com/xwmx/nb/master/plugins/copy.nb-plugin
    
    # install a plugin from a standard GitHub URL
    nb plugins install https://github.com/xwmx/nb/blob/master/plugins/example.nb-plugin
    
    # install a theme from a standard GitHub URL
    nb plugins install https://github.com/xwmx/nb/blob/master/plugins/turquoise.nb-theme
    
    # install a plugin from a path
    nb plugins install plugins/example.nb-plugin

    The <url> should be the full URL to the plugin file. nb also recognizes regular GitHub URLs, which can be used interchangably with raw GitHub URLs.

    Installed plugins can be listed with nb plugins, which optionally takes a name and prints full paths:

    ❯ nb plugins
    copy.nb-plugin
    example.nb-plugin
    turquoise.nb-theme
    
    ❯ nb plugins copy.nb-plugin
    copy.nb-plugin
    
    ❯ nb plugins --paths
    /home/example/.nb/.plugins/copy.nb-plugin
    /home/example/.nb/.plugins/example.nb-plugin
    /home/example/.nb/.plugins/turquoise.nb-theme
    
    ❯ nb plugins turquoise.nb-theme --paths
    /home/example/.nb/.plugins/turquoise.nb-theme

    Use nb plugins uninstall to uninstall a plugin:

    ❯ nb plugins uninstall example.nb-plugin
    Plugin successfully uninstalled:
    /home/example/.nb/.plugins/example.nb-plugin

    Creating Plugins

    Plugins are written in a Bash-compatible shell scripting language and have an .nb-plugin extension.

    nb includes a few example plugins:

    Create a new subcommand in three easy steps:

    1. Add the new subcommand name with _subcommands add <name>:
    _subcommands add "example"
    2. Define help and usage text with _subcommands describe <subcommand> <usage>:
    _subcommands describe "example" <<HEREDOC
    Usage:
      nb example
    
    Description:
      Print "Hello, World!"
    HEREDOC
    3. Define the subcommand as a function, named with a leading underscore:
    _example() {
      printf "Hello, World!\\n"
    }

    That's it! 🎉

    View the complete plugin: plugins/example.nb-plugin

    With example.nb-plugin installed, nb includes an nb example subcommand that prints "Hello, World!"

    For a full example, copy.nb-plugin adds copy / duplicate functionality to nb and demonstrates how to create a plugin using nb subcommands and simple shell scripting.

    You can install any plugin you create locally with nb plugins install <path>, and you can publish it on GitHub, GitLab, or anywhere else online and install it with nb plugins install <url>.

    API

    The nb API is the command line interface, which is designed for composability and provides a variety of powerful options for interacting with notes, bookmarks, notebooks, and nb functionality. Within plugins, subcommands can be called using their function names, which are named with leading underscores. Options can be used to output information in formats suitable for parsing and processing:

    # print the content of note 3 to standard output with no color
    _show 3 --print --no-color
    
    # list all unarchived global notebook names
    _notebooks --names --no-color --unarchived --global
    
    # list all filenames in the current notebook
    _list --filenames --no-id --no-indicator
    
    # print the path to the current notebook
    _notebooks current --path

    nb automatically scans arguments for selectors with notebook names and updates the current notebook if a valid one is found.

    Identifier selectors are passed to subcommands as arguments along with any subcommand options. Use show <selector> to query information about the file specified in the selector. For example, to obtain the filename of a selector-specified file, use show <selector> --filename:

    _example() {
      local _selector="${1:-}"
      [[ -z "${_selector:-}" ]] && printf "Usage: example <selector>\\n" && exit 1
    
      # Get the filename using the selector.
      local _filename
      _filename="$(_show "${_selector}" --filename)"
    
      # Rest of subcommand function...
    }

    notebooks current --path returns the path to the current notebook:

    # _example() continued:
    
    # get the notebook path
    local _notebook_path
    _notebook_path="$(_notebooks current --path)"
    
    # print the file at "${_notebook_path}/${_filename}" to standard output
    cat "${_notebook_path}/${_filename}"

    See copy.nb-plugin for a practical example using both show <selector> --filename and notebooks current --path along with other subcommands called using their underscore-prefixed function names.

    Selectors

    ↑ 

    Items in nb are primarily identified using structured arguments called "selectors." Selectors are like addresses for notebooks, folders, and items. A selector can be as simple as an id like 123 or folder path like example/, or it can combine multiple elements to identify an item in a nested folder within a particular notebook, such as cli:tools/shellcheck/home-page.bookmark.md.

    An item, folder, or notebook selector is constructed by specifying the notebook name, folder path, and / or item identifier in the following pattern:

    notebook:folder/path/item-idenitifer
    

    Represented in a docopt-like format:

    [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>]
    

    Notebooks are identified by the notebook name followed by a colon. Folder and item identifiers without a notebook name refer to items within the current notebook. When a selector consists of notebook name and colon with no folder path or item identifer, the command runs in the root folder of the notebook:

    # list items in the "example" notebook
    nb example:
    
    # add a new note named "Example Title" to the "example" notebook
    nb add example: --title "Example Title"
    
    # edit item with id "123" in the notebook "example"
    nb edit example:123

    A notebook selector can be combined with a subcommand name to run the command within the notebook:

    # list all items in the "example" notebook and display excerpts
    nb example:list -e
    
    # edit item with id "123" in the "example" notebook
    nb example:edit 123
    
    # show the git history for the notebook named "example"
    nb example:history

    Folders are identified by relative path from the notebook root. Folders can be referenced by either id or name, and segments in nested paths can mix and match names and ids:

    # list items in the folder named "sample" in the folder named demo"
    nb sample/demo/
    
    # add a new item to the folder named "demo" in the folder with id "3"
    nb add 3/demo/
    
    # show the history of the folder with id "4" in the folder named
    # "sample" in the notebook named "example"
    nb history example:sample/4/

    A trailing slash indicates that the command is expected to operate on the contents of the folder. When a trailing slash is omitted, the selector refers to the folder itself:

    ❯ nb list sample
    [1] 📂 sample
    
    ❯ nb list sample/
    [sample/3] Title Three
    [sample/2] Title Two
    [sample/1] Title One

    For more information about folders, see Folders.

    An item is identified by id, filename, or title, optionally preceeded by notebook name or folder path:

    # edit item with id "123"
    nb edit 123
    
    # open the item titled "demo title" in the folder with id "3"
    nb open 3/demo\ title
    
    # show "file.md" in the "sample" folder in the "example" notebook
    nb show example:sample/file.md

    Items can also be specified using the full path:

    # edit "demo.md" in the "sample" folder in the "home" notebook
    nb edit /home/example/.nb/home/sample/demo.md
    Examples

    Idenitifer Selectors

    123
    example.md
    title
    relative/path/to/123
    relative/path/to/demo.md
    relative/path/to/title
    /full/path/to/sample.md
    notebook:123
    notebook:example.md
    notebook:title
    notebook:relative/path/to/123
    notebook:relative/path/to/demo.md
    notebook:relative/path/to/title
    

    Subcommand Selectors

    notebook:
    notebook:show
    notebook:history
    notebook:a
    notebook:q
    

    Metadata

    Metadata in nb is primarily derived from git, the filesystem, and file content. For example, displayed timestamps are derived from git log, with nb show --added displaying the datetime of the first commit containing the file and nb show --updated displaying the datetime of the last commit in which the file was modified. Meanwhile, the file system's modified timestamp used for sorting.

    nb also uses plain text files to store ids and state information in git, including .index files, .pindex files, and .archived files.

    Front Matter

    User-defined metadata can be added to notes in nb using front matter. Front matter is a simple, human accessible, and future-friendly method for defining metadata fields in plain text and is well supported in tools for working with Markdown.

    Front matter is defined within a Markdown file with triple-dashed lines (---) indicating the start and end of the block, with each field represented by a key name with a colon followed by the value:

    ---
    title: Example Title
    author: xwmx
    year: 2021
    ---
    
    Example content.
    
    More example content:
    
    - one
    - two
    - three

    Any metadata can be placed in the front matter block. nb uses the title: field for listing, filtering, and selecting items, if one is present, and ignores any other fields.

    The simple key: value syntax is suitable for many metadata fields. More complex data can be defined using additional YAML capabilities.

    nb Interactive Shell

    ↑ · nb shell

    nb has an interactive shell that can be started with nb shell, nb -i, or nb --interactive:

    $ nb shell
    __          _
    \ \   _ __ | |__
     \ \ | '_ \| '_ \
     / / | | | | |_) |
    /_/  |_| |_|_.__/
    ------------------
    nb shell started. Enter ls to list notes and notebooks.
    Enter help for usage information. Enter exit to exit.
    nb❯ ls
    home
    ----
    [3] Example
    [2] Sample
    [1] Demo
    
    nb❯ edit 3 --content "New content."
    Updated: [3] Example
    
    nb❯ bookmark https://example.com
    Added: [4] 🔖 example.bookmark.md "Example Title (example.com)"
    
    nb❯ ls
    home
    ----
    [4] 🔖 Example Title (example.com)
    [3] Example
    [2] Sample
    [1] Demo
    
    nb❯ bookmark url 4
    https://example.com
    
    nb❯ search "example"
    [4] example.bookmark.md "Example (example.com)"
    -----------------------------------------------
    1:# Example (example.com)
    
    3:<https://example.com>
    
    [3] example.md "Example"
    ------------------------
    1:# Example
    
    nb❯ exit
    $

    The nb shell recognizes all nb subcommands and options, providing a streamlined, distraction-free approach for working with nb.

    Shortcut Aliases

    ↑ 

    Several core nb subcommands have shortcut aliases to make them faster to work with:

    # `a` (add): add a new note named "example.md"
    nb a example.md
    
    # `+` (add): add a new note titled "Example Title"
    nb + --title "Example Title"
    
    # `br` (browse): open the folder named "sample" in the web browser
    nb br sample/
    
    # `o` (open): open the URL from bookmark 12 in your web browser
    nb o 12
    
    # `p` (peek): open the URL from bookmark 6 in your terminal browser
    nb p 6
    
    # `e` (edit): edit note 5
    nb e 5
    
    # `d` (delete): delete note 19
    nb d 19
    
    # `d` (delete): delete note 123 in the notebook named "example:"
    nb - example:123
    
    # `s` (show): show note 27
    nb s 27
    
    # `q` (search): search notes for "example query"
    nb q "example query"
    
    # `h` (help): display the help information for the `add` subcommand
    nb h add
    
    # `u` (use): switch to example-notebook
    nb u example-notebook

    For more commands and options, run nb help or nb help <subcommand>

    nb browse themes

    Help

    nb · bookmark · subcommands · plugins

    add · archive · bookmark · browse · completions · count · delete · edit · env · export · git · help · history · import · init · list · ls · move · notebooks · open · peek · pin · plugins · remote · run · search · settings · shell · show · status · subcommands · sync · unarchive · unpin · unset · update · use · version

     ↑ 

    nb help

    ↑ · See also: help

    __          _
    \ \   _ __ | |__
     \ \ | '_ \| '_ \
     / / | | | | |_) |
    /_/  |_| |_|_.__/
    
    [nb] Command line and local web note-taking, bookmarking, and archiving with
    plain text data storage, encryption, filtering and search, pinning, #tagging,
    Git-backed versioning and syncing, Pandoc-backed conversion, global and local
    notebooks, customizable color themes, [[wiki-style linking]], plugins, and more
    in a single portable, user-friendly script.
    
    Help:
      nb help               Display this help information.
      nb help <subcommand>  View help information for <subcommand>.
      nb help --colors      View information about color settings.
      nb help --readme      View the `nb` README file.
    
    Usage:
      nb
      nb [<ls options>...] [<id> | <filename> | <path> | <title> | <notebook>]
      nb [<url>] [<bookmark options>...]
      nb add [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<filename>] [<content>]
             [-b | --browse] [-c <content> | --content <content>] [--edit]
             [-e | --encrypt] [-f <filename> | --filename <filename>]
             [--folder <folder-path>] [--tags <tag1>,<tag2>...]
             [-t <title> | --title <title>] [--type <type>]
      nb add folder [<name>]
      nb archive [<notebook>]
      nb bookmark [<ls options>...]
      nb bookmark [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/] <url>
                  [-c <comment> | --comment <comment>] [--edit] [-e | --encrypt]
                  [-f <filename> | --filename <filename>] [-q | --quote]
                  [-r <url> | --related <url>]... [--save-source] [--skip-content]
                  [-t <tag1>,<tag2>... | --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...] [--title <title>]
      nb bookmark [list [<list-options>...]]
      nb bookmark (open | peek | url) (<id> | <filename> | <path> | <title>)
      nb bookmark (edit | delete) (<id> | <filename> | <path> | <title>)
      nb bookmark search <query>
      nb browse [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>]
                [-g | --gui] [-n | --notebooks] [-p | --print] [-q | --query <query>]
                [-s | --serve]
      nb browse add [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<filename>]
                [-c <content> | --content <content>] [--tags <tag1>,<tag2>...]
                [-t <title> | --title <title>]
      nb browse delete ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb browse edit ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb completions (check | install [-d | --download] | uninstall)
      nb count [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/]
      nb delete ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])...
                [-f | --force]
      nb edit ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
              [-c <content> | --content <content>] [--edit]
              [-e <editor> | --editor <editor>] [--overwrite] [--prepend]
      nb export ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
                <path> [-f | --force] [<pandoc options>...]
      nb export notebook <name> [<path>]
      nb export pandoc ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
                [<pandoc options>...]
      nb git [checkpoint [<message>] | dirty]
      nb git <git-options>...
      nb help [<subcommand>] [-p | --print]
      nb help [-c | --colors] | [-r | --readme] | [-s | --short] [-p | --print]
      nb history [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>]
      nb import [copy | download | move] (<path>... | <url>) [--convert]
                [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<filename>]
      nb import notebook <path> [<name>]
      nb init [<remote-url> [<branch>]] [--author] [--email <email>]
              [--name <name>]
      nb list [-e [<length>] | --excerpt [<length>]] [--filenames]
              [-n <limit> | --limit <limit> |  --<limit>] [--no-id]
              [--no-indicator] [-p | --pager] [--paths] [-s | --sort]
              [-r | --reverse] [--tags] [-t <type> | --type <type> | --<type>]
              [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <path> | <query>]
      nb ls [-a | --all] [-b | --browse] [-e [<length>] | --excerpt [<length>]]
            [--filenames] [-g | --gui] [-n <limit> | --limit <limit> | --<limit>]
            [--no-footer] [--no-header] [--no-id] [--no-indicator] [-p | --pager]
            [--paths] [-s | --sort] [-r | --reverse] [--tags]
            [-t <type> | --type <type> | --<type>]
            [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <path> | <query>]
      nb move ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
              ([<notebook>:][<path>] | --reset | --to-bookmark | --to-note |
              --to-title) [-f | --force]
      nb notebooks [<name> | <query>] [--ar | --archived] [--global] [--local]
                   [--names] [--paths] [--unar | --unarchived]
      nb notebooks add <name> [<remote-url> [<branch>]] [--author]
                       [--email <email>] [--name <name>]
      nb notebooks (archive | open | peek | status | unarchive) [<name>]
      nb notebooks author [<name> | <path>] [--email <email>] [--name <name>]
      nb notebooks current [--path | --selected | --filename [<filename>]]
                           [--global | --local]
      nb notebooks delete <name> [-f | --force]
      nb notebooks (export <name> [<path>] | import <path>)
      nb notebooks init [<path> [<remote-url> [<branch>]]] [--author]
                        [--email <email>] [--name <name>]
      nb notebooks rename <old-name> <new-name>
      nb notebooks select <selector>
      nb notebooks show (<name> | <path> | <selector>) [--ar | --archived]
                        [--escaped | --name | --path | --filename [<filename>]]
      nb notebooks use <name>
      nb open ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb peek ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb pin  ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb plugins [<name>] [--paths]
      nb plugins install [<path> | <url>] [--force]
      nb plugins uninstall <name> [--force]
      nb remote [branches [<url>] | remove | rename [<branch-name>] <name>]
      nb remote [delete <branch-name> | reset <branch-name>]
      nb remote set <url> [<branch-name>]
      nb run <command> [<arguments>...]
      nb search ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
                <query>... [-a | --all] [--and <query>] [--or <query>]
                [-l | --list]  [--path] [-t <type> | --type <type> | --<type>]
                [--utility <name>]
      nb set [<name> [<value>] | <number> [<value>]]
      nb settings [colors [<number> | themes] | edit | list [--long]]
      nb settings (get | show | unset) (<name> | <number>)
      nb settings set (<name> | <number>) <value>
      nb shell [<subcommand> [<options>...] | --clear-history]
      nb show ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
              [[-a | --added] | [--authors] | [-b | --browse] | --filename | --id |
              --info-line | --path | [-p | --print] | --relative-path | [-r |
              --render] | --title | --type [<type>] | [-u | --updated]] [--no-color]
      nb show <notebook>
      nb status [<notebook>]
      nb subcommands [add <name>...] [alias <name> <alias>]
                     [describe <name> <usage>]
      nb sync [-a | --all]
      nb unarchive [<notebook>]
      nb unpin ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb unset (<name> | <number>)
      nb update
      nb use <notebook>
      nb -i | --interactive [<subcommand> [<options>...]]
      nb -h | --help | help [<subcommand> | --readme]
      nb --no-color
      nb --version | version
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)    List notes and notebooks. This is an alias for `nb ls`.
                   When a <url> is provided, create a new bookmark.
      add          Add a note, folder, or file.
      archive      Archive the current or specified notebook.
      bookmark     Add, open, list, and search bookmarks.
      browse       Browse and manage linked items in terminal and GUI web browsers.
      completions  Install and uninstall completion scripts.
      count        Print the number of items in a notebook or folder.
      delete       Delete a note.
      edit         Edit a note.
      export       Export a note to a variety of different formats.
      git          Run `git` commands within the current notebook.
      help         View help information for the program or a subcommand.
      history      View git history for the current notebook or a note.
      import       Import a file into the current notebook.
      init         Initialize the first notebook.
      list         List notes in the current notebook.
      ls           List notebooks and notes in the current notebook.
      move         Move or rename a note.
      notebooks    Manage notebooks.
      open         Open a bookmarked web page or notebook folder, or edit a note.
      peek         View a note, bookmarked web page, or notebook in the terminal.
      pin          Pin an item so it appears first in lists.
      plugins      Install and uninstall plugins and themes.
      remote       Configure the remote URL and branch for the notebook.
      run          Run shell commands within the current notebook.
      search       Search notes.
      settings     Edit configuration settings.
      shell        Start the `nb` interactive shell.
      show         Show a note or notebook.
      status       Run `git status` in the current notebook.
      subcommands  List, add, alias, and describe subcommands.
      status       Print notebook status information.
      sync         Sync local notebook with the remote repository.
      unarchive    Unarchive the current or specified notebook.
      unpin        Unpin a pinned item.
      unset        Return a setting to its default value.
      update       Update `nb` to the latest version.
      use          Switch to a notebook.
      version      Display version information.
    
    Notebook Usage:
      nb <notebook>:[<subcommand>] [<identifier>] [<options>...]
      nb <subcommand> <notebook>:<identifier> [<options>...]
    
    Program Options:
      -h, --help          Display this help information.
      -i, --interactive   Start the `nb` interactive shell.
      --no-color          Print without color highlighting.
      --version           Display version information.
    
    More Information:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb
    

    bookmark help

    ↑ · See also: Bookmarks, bookmark, browse

        __                __                        __
       / /_  ____  ____  / /______ ___  ____ ______/ /__
      / __ \/ __ \/ __ \/ //_/ __ `__ \/ __ `/ ___/ //_/
     / /_/ / /_/ / /_/ / ,< / / / / / / /_/ / /  / ,<
    /_.___/\____/\____/_/|_/_/ /_/ /_/\__,_/_/  /_/|_|
    
    bookmark -- Command line bookmarking with tagging, encryption,
    full-text page content search with regular expression support,
    GUI and terminal browser support, and data stored in plain text
    Markdown files with Git-backed versioning and syncing.
    
    Usage:
      bookmark [<ls options>...]
      bookmark [<notebook>:][<folder-path>] <url>
                  [-c <comment> | --comment <comment>] [--edit] [-e | --encrypt]
                  [-f <filename> | --filename <filename>] [-q | --quote]
                  [-r <url> | --related <url>]... [--save-source] [--skip-content]
                  [-t <tag1>,<tag2>... | --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...] [--title <title>]
      bookmark list [<list-options>...]
      bookmark (edit | delete | open | peek | url)
                  ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      bookmark search <query>
    
    Options:
      -c, --comment <comment>      A comment or description for this bookmark.
      --edit                       Open the bookmark in your editor before saving.
      -e, --encrypt                Encrypt the bookmark with a password.
      -f, --filename <filename>    The filename for the bookmark. It is
                                   recommended to omit the extension so the
                                   default bookmark extension is used.
      -q, --quote <quote>          A quote or excerpt from the saved page.
                                   Alias: `--excerpt`
      -r, --related <url>          A URL for a page related to the bookmarked page.
                                   Multiple `--related` flags can be used in a
                                   command to save multiple related URLs.
      --save-source                Save the page source as HTML.
      --skip-content               Omit page content from the note.
      -t, --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...  A comma-separated list of tags.
      --title <title>              The bookmark title. When not specified,
                                   `nb` will use the html <title> tag.
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  Add a new bookmark for <url>, or list bookmarks.
                 Bookmarks can also be added with `nb <url>`
      delete     Delete a bookmark.
      edit       Edit a bookmark.
      list       List bookmarks in the current notebook.
                 Shortcut Alias: `ls`
      open       Open the bookmarked page in your system's primary web browser.
                 Shortcut Alias: `o`
      peek       Open the bookmarked page in your terminal web browser.
                 Alias: `preview`
                 Shortcut Alias: `p`
      search     Search bookmarks for <query>.
                 Shortcut Alias: `q`
      url        Print the URL for the specified bookmark.
    
    Description:
      Create, view, search, edit, and delete bookmarks.
    
      By default, the html page content is saved within the bookmark, making the
      bookmarked page available for full-text search. When Pandoc [1] is
      installed, the HTML content is converted to Markdown before saving.
      When readability-cli [2] is install, markup is cleaned up to focus on
      content.
    
      `peek` opens the page in `w3m` [3] or `lynx` [4] when available.
      To specify a preferred browser, set the `$BROWSER` environment variable
      in your .bashrc, .zshrc, or equivalent, e.g., `export BROWSER="lynx"`.
    
      Bookmarks are identified by the `.bookmark.md` file extension. The
      bookmark URL is the first URL in the file within "<" and ">" characters:
    
        <https://www.example.com>
    
        1. https://pandoc.org/
        2. https://gitlab.com/gardenappl/readability-cli
        3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W3m
        4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(web_browser)
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-bookmarks
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help open
      nb help peek
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      bookmark https://example.com
      bookmark https://example.com --encrypt
      bookmark https://example.com --tags example,sample,demo
      bookmark https://example.com/about -c "Example comment."
      bookmark https://example.com/faqs -f example-filename
      bookmark https://example.com --quote "Example quote or excerpt."
      bookmark list
      bookmark search "example query"
      bookmark open 5
    
    ------------------------------------------
    Part of `nb` (https://github.com/xwmx/nb).
    For more information, see: `nb help`.
    

    Subcommands

    add · archive · bookmark · browse · completions · count · delete · edit · env · export · git · help · history · import · init · list · ls · move · notebooks · open · peek · pin · plugins · remote · run · search · settings · shell · show · status · subcommands · sync · unarchive · unpin · unset · update · use · version

     ↑ 

    add

    ↑ · See also: Adding, bookmark, browse, delete, edit, import, show

    Usage:
      nb add [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<filename>] [<content>]
             [-b | --browse] [-c <content> | --content <content>] [--edit]
             [-e | --encrypt] [-f <filename> | --filename <filename>]
             [--folder <folder-path>] [--tags <tag1>,<tag2>...]
             [-t <title> | --title <title>] [--type <type>]
      nb add folder [<name>]
    
    Options:
      -b, --browse                Add using a terminal or GUI web browser.
      -c, --content <content>     The content for the new note.
      --edit                      Open the note in the editor before saving when
                                  content is piped or passed as an argument.
      -e, --encrypt               Encrypt the note with a password.
      -f, --filename <filename>   The filename for the new note.
      --folder <folder-path>      Add within the folder located at <folder-path>.
      --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...     A comma-separated list of tags.
      -t, --title <title>         The title for a new note. If `--title` is
                                  present, the filename is derived from the
                                  title, unless `--filename` is specified.
      --type <type>               The file type for the new note, as a file
                                  extension.
    
    Description:
      Create a new note or folder.
    
      If no arguments are passed, a new blank note file is opened with
      `$EDITOR`, currently set to "example". If a non-option argument is
      passed, `nb` will treat it as a <filename≥ if a file extension is found.
      If no file extension is found, `nb` will treat the string as
      <content> and will create a new note without opening the editor.
      `nb add` can also create a new note with piped content.
    
      `nb` creates Markdown files by default. To create a note with a
      different file type, use the extension in the filename or use the `--type`
      option. To change the default file type, use `nb set default_extension`.
    
      When the `-e` / `--encrypt` option is used, `nb` will encrypt the
      note with AES-256 using OpenSSL by default, or GPG, if configured in
      `nb set encryption_tool`.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#adding
    
    See Also:
      nb help bookmark
      nb help browse
      nb help delete
      nb help edit
      nb help import
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      nb add
      nb add example.md
      nb add "Note content."
      nb add example.md --title "Example Title" --content "Example content."
      echo "Note content." | nb add
      nb add -t "Secret Document" --encrypt
      nb add example/document.md
      nb add folder sample/demo
      nb example:add
      nb example:add -t "Title"
      nb a
      nb a "Note content."
      nb example:a
      nb example:a -t "Title"
    
    Aliases: `nb create`, `nb new`
    Shortcut Aliases: `nb a`, `nb +`
    

    archive

    ↑ · See also: Archiving Notebooks, notebooks, status, unarchive

    Usage:
      nb archive [<name>]
    
    Description:
      Set the current notebook or notebook <name> to "archived" status.
    
      This is an alias for `nb notebooks archive`.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#archiving-notebooks
    
    See Also:
      nb help notebooks
      nb help status
      nb help unarchive
    
    Examples:
      nb archive
      nb archive example
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb ar`
    

    bookmark

    ↑ · See also: Bookmarks, browse, open, peek, show

    Usage:
      nb bookmark [<ls options>...]
      nb bookmark [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/] <url>
                  [-c <comment> | --comment <comment>] [--edit] [-e | --encrypt]
                  [-f <filename> | --filename <filename>] [-q | --quote]
                  [-r <url> | --related <url>]... [--save-source] [--skip-content]
                  [-t <tag1>,<tag2>... | --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...] [--title <title>]
      nb bookmark list [<list-options>...]
      nb bookmark (edit | delete | open | peek | url)
                  ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb bookmark search <query>
    
    Options:
      -c, --comment <comment>      A comment or description for this bookmark.
      --edit                       Open the bookmark in your editor before saving.
      -e, --encrypt                Encrypt the bookmark with a password.
      -f, --filename <filename>    The filename for the bookmark. It is
                                   recommended to omit the extension so the
                                   default bookmark extension is used.
      -q, --quote <quote>          A quote or excerpt from the saved page.
                                   Alias: `--excerpt`
      -r, --related <url>          A URL for a page related to the bookmarked page.
                                   Multiple `--related` flags can be used in a
                                   command to save multiple related URLs.
      --save-source                Save the page source as HTML.
      --skip-content               Omit page content from the note.
      -t, --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...  A comma-separated list of tags.
      --title <title>              The bookmark title. When not specified,
                                   `nb` will use the html <title> tag.
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  Add a new bookmark for <url>, or list bookmarks.
                 Bookmarks can also be added with `nb <url>`
      delete     Delete a bookmark.
      edit       Edit a bookmark.
      list       List bookmarks in the current notebook.
                 Shortcut Alias: `ls`
      open       Open the bookmarked page in your system's primary web browser.
                 Shortcut Alias: `o`
      peek       Open the bookmarked page in your terminal web browser.
                 Alias: `preview`
                 Shortcut Alias: `p`
      search     Search bookmarks for <query>.
                 Shortcut Alias: `q`
      url        Print the URL for the specified bookmark.
    
    Description:
      Create, view, search, edit, and delete bookmarks.
    
      By default, the html page content is saved within the bookmark, making the
      bookmarked page available for full-text search. When Pandoc [1] is
      installed, the HTML content is converted to Markdown before saving.
      When readability-cli [2] is install, markup is cleaned up to focus on
      content.
    
      `peek` opens the page in `w3m` [3], `links` [4], or `lynx` [5] when
      available. To specify a preferred browser, set the `$BROWSER` environment
      variable in your .bashrc, .zshrc, or equivalent, e.g.: export BROWSER="links"
    
      Bookmarks are identified by the `.bookmark.md` file extension. The
      bookmark URL is the first URL in the file within "<" and ">" characters:
    
        <https://www.example.com>
    
        1. https://pandoc.org/
        2. https://gitlab.com/gardenappl/readability-cli
        3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W3m
        4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Links_(web_browser)
        5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(web_browser)
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-bookmarks
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help open
      nb help peek
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      nb https://example.com
      nb example: https://example.com
      nb https://example.com --encrypt
      nb https://example.com --tags example,sample,demo
      nb https://example.com/about -c "Example comment."
      nb https://example.com/faqs -f example-filename
      nb https://example.com --quote "Example quote or excerpt."
      nb bookmark list
      nb bookmark search "example query"
      nb bookmark open 5
      nb bk
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb bk`
    

    browse

    ↑ · See also: Browsing, Linking, add, delete, edit, list, ls, open, peek, pin, search, show, unpin

    Usage:
      nb browse [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>]
                [-g | --gui] [-n | --notebooks] [-p | --print] [-q | --query <query>]
                [-s | --serve]
      nb browse add [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<filename>]
                [-c <content> | --content <content>] [--tags <tag1>,<tag2>...]
                [-t <title> | --title <title>]
      nb browse delete ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
      nb browse edit ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  Open a notebook, folder, or item in the terminal or GUI web browser.
      add        Open the add view in the browser.
                 Shortcut Aliases: `a`, `+`
      delete     Open the delete view in the browser.
                 Shortcut Aliases: `d`, `-`
      edit       Open the edit view in the browser.
                 Shortcut Alias:   `e`
    
    Options:
      -c, --content <content>      Add content to the new note.
      -g, --gui                    Open in the system's primary GUI web browser.
      -n, --notebooks              Browse notebooks.
      -p, --print                  Print to standard output.
      -q, --query <query>          Open to the search results for <query>.
      -s, --serve                  Start the web application server.
      -t, --tags <tag1>,<tag2>...  A comma-separated list of tags.
      -t, --title <title>          Add a title to the new note.
    
    Description:
      Browse, view, and edit linked notes, bookmarks, notebooks, folders, and
      other items using terminal and GUI web browsers.
    
      `browse` includes an embedded web application designed for terminal
      and GUI web browsers that renders [[wiki-style links]] and #tags as
      internal links, providing the ability to browse notes and notebooks,
      as well as seamlessly browse to and from the offsite links in
      bookmarks and notes.
    
      To link to a note or bookmark from another, include the selector for the
      target item within double square brackets anywhere in the linking document:
    
        # link to item 123 in the "sample" folder in the "example" notebook
        [[example:sample/123]]
    
        # link to the item titled "Example Title" in the "demo" notebook
        [[demo:Example Title]]
    
      `browse` supports `w3m` [1] (recommended), `links` [2], and `lynx` [3]
      and depends on `ncat` [4] and `pandoc` [5]:
    
        1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W3m
        2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Links_(web_browser)
        3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(web_browser)
        4. https://nmap.org/ncat/
        5. https://pandoc.org/
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-browsing
    
    See Also:
      nb help add
      nb help delete
      nb help edit
      nb help list
      nb help ls
      nb help open
      nb help peek
      nb help pin
      nb help search
      nb help show
      nb help unpin
    
    Examples:
      nb browse
      nb browse example:
      nb browse Example\ Folder/
      nb browse 123
      nb browse demo:456
      nb br
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb br`
    

    completions

    ↑ · See also: Tab Completion, env

    Usage:
      nb completions (check | install [-d | --download] | uninstall)
    
    Options:
      -d, --download  Download the completion scripts and install.
    
    Description:
      Manage completion scripts.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb/blob/master/etc/README.md
    
    See Also:
      nb help env
    

    count

    ↑ 

    Usage:
      nb count [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/]
    
    Description:
      Print the number of items in the first level of the current notebook,
      <notebook>, or the folder at <folder-path>.
    

    delete

    ↑ · See also: Deleting, add, browse, edit, move, show

    Usage:
      nb delete ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])...
                [-f | --force]
    
    Options:
      -f, --force   Skip the confirmation prompt.
    
    Description:
      Delete one or more items.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#deleting
    
    See Also:
      nb help add
      nb help browse
      nb help edit
      nb help move
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      nb delete 3
      nb delete example.md
      nb delete "A Document Title"
      nb 3 delete --force
      nb example:delete 12
      nb delete example:12
      nb example:12 delete
      nb d 3
      nb 3 d
      nb d example:12
      nb example:12 d
    
    Shortcut Aliases: `nb d`, `nb -`
    

    edit

    ↑ · See also: Editing, add, browse, delete, move, show

    Usage:
      nb edit ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
              [-c <content> | --content <content>] [--edit]
              [-e <editor> | --editor <editor>] [--overwrite] [--prepend]
    
    Options:
      -c, --content <content>  Content to add to the item.
      --edit                   Open the note in the editor before saving when
                               content is piped or passed as an argument.
      -e, --editor <editor>    Edit the note with <editor>, overriding the editor
                               specified in the `$EDITOR` environment variable.
      --overwrite              Overwrite existing content with <content> and
                               standard input.
      --prepend                Prepend <content> and standard input before
                               existing content.
    
    Description:
      Open the specified note in `$EDITOR` or <editor> if specified.
      Content piped to `nb edit` or passed using the `--content` option
      is appended to the file without opening it in the editor,
      unless the `--edit` flag is specified.
    
      Non-text files are opened in your system's preferred app or program for
      that file type.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#editing
    
    See Also:
      nb help add
      nb help browse
      nb help delete
      nb help move
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      nb edit 3
      nb edit example.md
      nb edit "A Document Title"
      echo "Content to append." | nb edit 1
      nb 3 edit
      nb example:edit 12
      nb edit example:12
      nb example:12 edit
      nb e 3
      nb 3 e
      nb e example:12
      nb example:12 e
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb e`
    

    env

    ↑ · See also: Installation, completions, init, update, version

    Usage:
      nb env [install]
    
    Subcommands:
      install  Install dependencies on supported systems.
    
    Description:
      Print program environment and configuration information, or install
      dependencies.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#installation
    
    See Also:
      nb help completions
      nb help init
      nb help update
      nb help version
    

    export

    ↑ · See also: Import / Export, import

    Usage:
      nb export ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
                <path> [-f | --force] [<pandoc options>...]
      nb export notebook <name> [<path>]
      nb export pandoc ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
                [<pandoc options>...]
    
    Options:
      -f, --force   Skip the confirmation prompt when overwriting an existing file.
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)     Export a file to <path>. If <path> has a different extension
                    than the source note, convert the note using `pandoc`.
      notebook      Export the notebook <name> to the current directory or <path>.
                    Alias for `nb notebooks export`.
      pandoc        Export the file to standard output or a file using `pandoc`.
                    `export pandoc` prints to standard output by default.
    
    Description:
      Export a file or notebook.
    
      If Pandoc [1] is available, convert the note from its current format
      to the format of the output file as indicated by the file extension
      in <path>. Any additional arguments are passed directly to Pandoc.
      See the Pandoc help information for available options.
    
        1. https://pandoc.org/
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#%EF%B8%8F-import--export
    
    See Also:
      nb help import
    
    Examples:
      # Export an Org note
      nb export example.org /path/to/example.org
    
      # Export a Markdown note to HTML and print to standard output
      nb export pandoc example.md --from=markdown_strict --to=html
    
      # Export a Markdown note to a .docx Microsoft Office Word document
      nb export example.md /path/to/example.docx
    
      # Export note 12 in the "sample" notebook to HTML
      nb export sample:12 /path/to/example.html
    

    git

    ↑ · See also: Git Sync, History, history, remote, run, status, sync

    Usage:
      nb git [checkpoint [<message>] | dirty]
      nb git <git-options>...
    
    Subcommands:
      checkpoint    Create a new git commit in the current notebook and sync with
                    the remote if `nb set auto_sync` is enabled.
      dirty         0 (success, true) if there are uncommitted changes in
                    <notebook-path>. 1 (error, false) if <notebook-path> is clean.
    
    Description:
      Run `git` commands within the current notebook directory.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-git-sync
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-revision-history
    
    See Also:
      nb help history
      nb help remote
      nb help run
      nb help status
      nb help sync
    
    Examples:
      nb git status
      nb git diff
      nb git log
      nb example:git status
    

    help

    ↑ · See also: nb help

    Usage:
      nb help [<subcommand>] [-p | --print]
      nb help [-c | --colors] | [-r | --readme] | [-s | --short] [-p | --print]
    
    Options:
      -c, --colors  View information about color themes and color settings.
      -p, --print   Print to standard output / terminal.
      -r, --readme  View the `nb` README file.
      -s, --short   Print shorter help without subcommand descriptions.
    
    Description:
      Print the program help information. When a subcommand name is passed, print
      the help information for the subcommand.
    
    Examples:
      nb help
      nb help add
      nb help import
      nb h notebooks
      nb h e
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb h`
    

    history

    ↑ · See also: History, Git Sync, git, remote, status, sync

    Usage:
      nb history [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>]
    
    Description:
      Display notebook history using `tig` [1] (if available) or `git log`.
      When a note is specified, the history for that note is displayed.
    
        1. https://github.com/jonas/tig
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-revision-history
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-git-sync
    
    See Also:
      nb help git
      nb help remote
      nb help status
      nb help sync
    
    Examples:
      nb history
      nb history example.md
      nb 3 history
      nb history example:
      nb example:history
      nb example:history 12
      nb history example:12
      nb example:12 history
    

    import

    ↑ · See also: Import / Export, add, export

    Usage:
      nb import [copy | download | move] (<path>... | <url>) [--convert]
                [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<filename>]
      nb import notebook <path> [<name>]
    
    Options:
      --convert  Convert HTML content to Markdown.
    
    Subcommands:
      (default) Copy or download the file(s) at <path> or <url>.
      copy      Copy the file(s) at <path> into the current notebook.
      download  Download the file at <url> into the current notebook.
      move      Move the file(s) at <path> into the current notebook.
      notebook  Import the local notebook at <path> to make it global.
    
    Description:
      Copy, move, or download files into the current notebook or import
      a local notebook to make it global.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#%EF%B8%8F-import--export
    
    See Also:
      nb help add
      nb help export
    
    Examples:
      nb import ~/Pictures/example.png
      nb import ~/Documents/example.docx
      nb import https://example.com/example.pdf
      nb example:import https://example.com/example.jpg
      nb import ./*
      nb import ./*.md
      nb import ~/Pictures/example.png example-notebook:
      nb import ~/Documents/example.docx example-folder/
    

    init

    ↑ · See also: notebooks

    Usage:
      nb init [<remote-url> [<branch>]] [--author] [--email <email>]
              [--name <name>]
    
    Options:
      --author         Display the local email and name config prompt.
      --email <email>  Set the local commit author email address to <email>.
      --name  <name>   Set the local commit author name to <name>.
    
    Description:
      Initialize the initial "home" notebook and generate a configuration file at:
    
          ~/.nbrc
    
      Pass optional <remote-url> and <branch> arguments to create the initial
      "home" notebook using a clone of an existing notebook.
    
    See Also:
      nb help notebooks
    
    Examples:
      nb init
      nb init https://github.com/example/example.git
      nb init https://github.com/example/example.git example-branch
    

    list

    ↑ · See also: Listing & Filtering, browse, ls, pin, search, unpin

    Usage:
      nb list [-e [<length>] | --excerpt [<length>]] [--filenames]
              [-n <limit> | --limit <limit> |  --<limit>] [--no-id]
              [--no-indicator] [-p | --pager] [--paths] [-s | --sort]
              [-r | --reverse] [--tags] [-t <type> | --type <type> | --<type>]
              [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <path> | <query>]
    
    Options:
      -e, --excerpt [<length>]        Print an excerpt <length> lines long under
                                      each note's filename [default: 3].
      --filenames                     Print the filename for each note.
      -n, --limit <limit>, --<limit>  The maximum number of notes to list.
      --no-id                         Don't include the id in list items.
      --no-indicator                  Don't include the indicator in list items.
      -p, --pager                     Display output in the pager.
      --paths                         Print the full path to each item.
      -s, --sort                      Order notes by id.
      -r, --reverse                   List items in reverse order.
      --tags                          List tags in the notebook or folder.
      -t, --type <type>, --<type>     List items of <type>. <type> can be a file
                                      extension or one of the following types:
                                      archive, audio, book, bookmark, document,
                                      folder, image, note, text, video
    
    Description:
      List notes in the current notebook.
    
      When <id>, <filename>, <path>, or <title> are present, the listing for the
      matching note is displayed. When no match is found, titles and filenames
      are searched for any that match <query> as a case-insensitive regular
      expression.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#listing--filtering
    
    Indicators:
      🔉  Audio
      📖  Book
      🔖  Bookmark
      🔒  Encrypted
      📂  Folder
      🌄  Image
      📄  PDF, Word, or Open Office document
      📹  Video
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help ls
      nb help pin
      nb help search
      nb help unpin
    
    Examples:
      nb list
      nb list example.md -e 10
      nb list --excerpt --no-id
      nb list --filenames --reverse
      nb list "^Example.*"
      nb list --10
      nb list --type document
      nb example:list
    

    ls

    ↑ · See also: Listing & Filtering, browse, list, pin, search, unpin

    Usage:
      nb ls [-a | --all] [-b | --browse] [-e [<length>] | --excerpt [<length>]]
            [--filenames] [-g | --gui] [-n <limit> | --limit <limit> | --<limit>]
            [--no-footer] [--no-header] [--no-id] [--no-indicator] [-p | --pager]
            [--paths] [-s | --sort] [-r | --reverse] [--tags]
            [-t <type> | --type <type> | --<type>]
            [<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <path> | <query>]
    
    Options:
      -a, --all                       Print all items in the notebook. Equivalent
                                      to no limit.
      -b, --browse                    Open the specified item or current notebook
                                      with `browse` in a terminal web browser.
      -e, --excerpt [<length>]        Print an excerpt <length> lines long under
                                      each note's filename [default: 3].
      --filenames                     Print the filename for each note.
      -g, --gui                       Open the specified item or current notebook
                                      with `browse` in a GUI web browser.
      -n, --limit <limit>, --<limit>  The maximum number of listed items.
                                      [default: 15]
      --no-header                     Print without header.
      --no-footer                     Print without footer.
      --no-id                         Don't include the id in list items.
      --no-indicator                  Don't include the indicator in list items.
      -p, --pager                     Display output in the pager.
      --paths                         Print the full path to each item.
      -s, --sort                      Order notes by id.
      -r, --reverse                   List items in reverse order.
      --tags                          List tags in the notebook or folder.
      -t, --type <type>, --<type>     List items of <type>. <type> can be a file
                                      extension or one of the following types:
                                      archive, audio, book, bookmark, document,
                                      folder, image, note, text, video
    
    Description:
      List notebooks and notes in the current notebook, displaying note titles
      when available. `nb ls` is a combination of `nb notebooks` and
      `nb list` in one view.
    
      When <id>, <filename>, <path>, or <title> are present, the listing for the
      matching note is displayed. When no match is found, titles and filenames
      are searched for any that match <query> as a case-insensitive regular
      expression.
    
      Options are passed through to `list`. For more information, see
      `nb help list`.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#listing--filtering
    
    Indicators:
      🔉  Audio
      📖  Book
      🔖  Bookmark
      🔒  Encrypted
      📂  Folder
      🌄  Image
      📄  PDF, Word, or Open Office document
      📹  Video
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help list
      nb help pin
      nb help search
      nb help unpin
    
    Examples:
      nb
      nb --all
      nb ls
      nb ls example.md -e 10
      nb ls --excerpt --no-id
      nb ls --reverse
      nb ls "^Example.*"
      nb ls --10
      nb ls --type document
      nb example:
      nb example: -ae
      nb example:ls
    

    move

    ↑ · See also: Moving & Renaming, delete, edit

    Usage:
      nb move ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
              ([<notebook>:][<path>] | --reset | --to-bookmark | --to-note |
              --to-title) [-f | --force]
    
    Options:
      -f, --force     Skip the confirmation prompt.
      --reset         Reset the filename to the last modified timestamp.
      --to-bookmark   Preserve the existing filename and replace the extension
                      with ".bookmark.md" to convert the note to a bookmark.
      --to-note       Preserve the existing filename and replace the bookmark's
                      ".bookmark.md" extension with ".md" to convert the bookmark
                      to a Markdown note.
      --to-title      Set the filename to the note title, lowercased with spaces
                      and disallowed filename characters replaced with underscores.
    
    Description:
      Move or rename a note. Move the note to <path> or change the file type.
      When the file extension is omitted, the existing extension is used.
      When only a file extension is specified, only the extension will be updated.
    
      `nb move` and `nb rename` are aliases and can be used interchangably.
    
    See Also:
      nb help delete
      nb help edit
    
    Examples:
      # move "example.md" to "sample.org"
      nb move example.md sample.org
    
      # rename note 3 ("example.md") to "New Name.md"
      nb rename 3 "New Name"
    
      # rename "example.bookmark.md" to "New Name.bookmark.md"
      nb move example.bookmark.md "New Name"
    
      # rename note 3 ("example.md") to a bookmark named "example.bookmark.md"
      nb rename 3 --to-bookmark
    
      # move note 12 into "Sample Folder" in the "demo" notebook
      nb move example:12 demo:Sample\ Folder/
    
      # rename note 12 in the "example" notebook to "sample.md"
      nb rename example:12 "sample.md"
    
      # change the file extension of note 5 to .org
      nb rename 5 .org
    
    Alias: `nb rename`
    Shortcut Alias: `nb mv`
    

    notebooks

    ↑ · See also: Notebooks, archive, history, move, remote, status, sync, unarchive, use

    Usage:
      nb notebooks [<name> | <query>] [--ar | --archived] [--global] [--local]
                   [--names] [--paths] [--unar | --unarchived]
      nb notebooks add <name> [<remote-url> [<branch>]] [--author]
                       [--email <email>] [--name <name>]
      nb notebooks (archive | open | peek | status | unarchive) [<name>]
      nb notebooks author [<name> | <path>] [--email <email>] [--name <name>]
      nb notebooks current [--path | --selected | --filename [<filename>]]
                           [--global | --local]
      nb notebooks delete <name> [-f | --force]
      nb notebooks (export <name> [<path>] | import <path>)
      nb notebooks init [<path> [<remote-url> [<branch>]]] [--author]
                        [--email <email>] [--name <name>]
      nb notebooks rename <old-name> <new-name>
      nb notebooks select <selector>
      nb notebooks show (<name> | <path> | <selector>) [--ar | --archived]
                        [--escaped | --name | --path | --filename [<filename>]]
      nb notebooks use <name>
    
    Options:
      --ar, --archived         List archived notebooks, or return archival status
                               with `show`.
      --author                 Set the notebook's commit author email and name.
      --email <email>          Set the notebook's commit author email to <email>.
      --escaped                Print the notebook name with spaces escaped.
      --filename [<filename>]  Print an available filename for the notebooks. When
                               <filename> is provided, check for an existing file
                               and provide a filename with an appended sequence
                               number for uniqueness.
      --global                 List global notebooks or the notebook set globally
                               with `use`.
      --local                  Exit with 0 if current within a local notebook,
                               otherwise exit with 1.
      -f, --force              Skip the confirmation prompt.
      --name, --names          Print the notebook name.
      --name <name>            Set the notebook's commit author name to <name>.
      --path, --paths          Print the notebook path.
      --selected               Exit with 0 if the current notebook differs from
                               the current global notebook, otherwise exit with 1.
      --unar, --unarchived     Only list unarchived notebooks.
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  List notebooks.
      add        Create a new global notebook. When an existing notebook's
                 <remote-url> is specified, create the new global notebook as a
                 clone of <remote-url>.
                 Aliases: `nb notebooks create`, `nb notebooks new`
      archive    Set the current notebook or notebook <name> to "archived" status.
      author     Configure the commit author email and name for the notebook.
      export     Export the notebook <name> to the current directory or <path>,
                 making it usable as a local notebook.
      import     Import the local notebook at <path> to make it global.
      init       Create a new local notebook. Specify a <path> or omit to
                 initialize the current working directory as a local notebook.
                 Specify <remote-url> to clone an existing notebook.
      current    Print the current notebook name or path.
      delete     Delete a notebook.
      open       Open the current notebook directory or notebook <name> in the
                 file browser, explorer, or finder.
                 Shortcut Alias: `o`
      peek       Open the current notebook directory or notebook <name> in the
                 first tool found in the following list:
                 `ranger` [1], `mc` [2], `vifm` [3], `exa` [4], or `ls`.
                 Shortcut Alias: `p`
      rename     Rename a notebook. Aliases: `move`, `mv`
      select     Set the current notebook from a colon-prefixed selector.
                 Not persisted. Selection format: <notebook>:<identifier>
      status     Print the archival status of the current notebook or
                 notebook <name>.
      show       Show and return information about a specified notebook.
      unarchive  Remove "archived" status from the current notebook or notebook <name>.
      use        Switch to a notebook.
    
        1. https://ranger.github.io/
        2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_Commander
        3. https://vifm.info/
        4. https://github.com/ogham/exa
    
    Description:
      Manage notebooks.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-notebooks
    
    See Also:
      nb help archive
      nb help history
      nb help move
      nb help remote
      nb help status
      nb help sync
      nb help unarchive
      nb help use
    
    Examples:
      nb notebooks --names
      nb notebooks add sample
      nb notebooks add example https://github.com/example/example.git
      nb nb current --path
      nb nb archive example
    
    Shortcut Aliases: `nb n`, `nb nb`
    

    open

    ↑ · See also: Viewing Bookmarks, bookmark, browse, peek, show

    Usage:
      nb open ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
    
    Description:
      Open an item or notebook. When the item is a bookmark, open the bookmarked
      page in your system's primary web browser. When the item is in a text format
      or any other file type, `open` is the equivalent of `edit`. `open`
      with a notebook opens the notebook folder in the system's file browser.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#viewing-bookmarks
    
    See also:
      nb help bookmark
      nb help browse
      nb help peek
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      nb open 3
      nb open example.bookmark.md
      nb 3 open
      nb example:open 12
      nb open example:12
      nb example:12 open
      nb o 3
      nb 3 o
      nb o example:12
      nb example:12 o
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb o`
    

    peek

    ↑ · See also: Viewing Bookmarks, bookmark, browse, open, show

    Usage:
      nb peek ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
    
    Description:
      View an item or notebook in the terminal. When the item is a bookmark, view
      the bookmarked page in your terminal web browser. When the note is in a text
      format or any other file type, `peek` is the equivalent of `show`. When
      used with a notebook, `peek` opens the notebook folder first tool found in
      the following list: `ranger` [1], `mc` [2], `exa` [3], or `ls`.
    
        1. https://ranger.github.io/
        2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_Commander
        3. https://github.com/ogham/exa
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#viewing-bookmarks
    
    See also:
      nb help bookmark
      nb help browse
      nb help open
      nb help show
    
    Examples:
      nb peek 3
      nb peek example.bookmark.md
      nb 3 peek
      nb example:peek 12
      nb peek example:12
      nb example:12 peek
      nb p 3
      nb 3 p
      nb p example:12
      nb example:12 p
    
    Alias: `nb preview`
    Shortcut Alias: `nb p`
    

    pin

    ↑ · See also: Pinning, browse, list, ls, unpin

    Usage:
      nb pin ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
    
    Description:
      Pin an item so it appears first in lists.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-pinning
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help list
      nb help ls
      nb help unpin
    
    Examples:
      nb pin 123
      nb pin example:sample/321
    

    plugins

    ↑ · See also: Plugins, subcommands

    Usage:
      nb plugins [<name>] [--paths] [--force]
      nb plugins install [<path> | <url>] [--force]
      nb plugins uninstall <name>
    
    Options:
      --paths  Print the full path to each plugin.
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  List plugins.
      install    Install a plugin from a <path> or <url>.
      uninstall  Uninstall the specified plugin.
    
    Description:
      Manage plugins and themes.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-plugins
    
    Plugin Extensions:
      .nb-theme   Plugins defining color themes.
      .nb-plugin  Plugins defining new subcommands and functionality.
    
    See Also:
      nb help subcommands
    

    remote

    ↑ · See also: Git Sync, History, history, notebooks, status, sync

    Usage:
      nb remote
      nb remote branches [<url>]
      nb remote delete <branch-name>
      nb remote remove
      nb remote rename [<branch-name>] <name>
      nb remote reset <branch-name>
      nb remote set <url> [<branch-name>]
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  Print the remote URL and branch for the notebook.
      branches   List branches on the current or given remote.
      delete     Delete <branch-name> from the remote.
                 Caveat: only orphan branches can be deleted.
      remove     Remove the remote URL from the notebook.
                 Alias: `unset`
      rename     Rename the current orphan branch or <branch-name> to <name>.
                 Caveat: only orphan branches can be renamed.
      reset      Reset <branch-name> on the remote to a blank initial state.
      set        Set the remote URL and branch for the notebook.
    
    Description:
      Configure the remote repository URL and branch for the current notebook.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-git-sync
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-revision-history
    
    See Also:
      nb help history
      nb help notebooks
      nb help status
      nb help sync
    
    Examples:
      nb remote set https://github.com/example/example.git
      nb remote remove
      nb example-notebook:remote set https://github.com/example/example.git
    

    run

    ↑ · See also: git, shell

    Usage:
      nb run <command> [<arguments>...]
    
    Description:
      Run shell commands within the current notebook directory.
    
    See Also:
      nb help git
      nb help shell
    
    Examples:
      nb run ls -la
      nb run find . -name 'example*'
      nb run rg example
    

    search

    ↑ · See also: Search, browse, list, ls

    Usage:
      nb search ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
                <query>... [-a | --all] [--and <query>] [--or <query>]
                [-l | --list]  [--path] [-t <type> | --type <type> | --<type>]
                [--utility <name>]
    
    Options:
      -a, --all                     Search all unarchived notebooks.
      --and <query>                 Add a AND query.
      -l, --list                    Print the id, filename, and title listing for
                                    each matching file, without the excerpt.
      --or <query>                  Add an OR query.
      --path                        Print the full path for each matching file.
      -t, --type <type>, --<type>   Search items of <type>. <type> can be a file
                                    extension or one of the following types:
                                    note, bookmark, document, archive, image,
                                    video, audio, folder, text
      --utility <name>              The name of the search utility to search with.
    
    Description:
      Perform a full text search.
    
      Multiple query arguments are treated as AND queries, returning items that
      match all queries. AND queries can also be specified with the --and <query>
      option. The --or <query> option can be used to specify an OR query,
      returning items that match at least one of the queries.
    
      `nb search` is powered by Git's built-in `git grep` tool. `nb` also
      supports performing searches with alternative search tools using the
      --utility <name> option.
    
      Supported alternative search tools:
        1. `rga`   https://github.com/phiresky/ripgrep-all
        2. `rg`    https://github.com/BurntSushi/ripgrep
        3. `ag`    https://github.com/ggreer/the_silver_searcher
        4. `ack`   https://beyondgrep.com/
        5. `grep`  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grep
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-search
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help list
      nb help ls
    
    Examples:
      # search current notebook for "example query"
      nb search "example query"
    
      # search the notebook "example" for "example query"
      nb search example: "example query"
    
      # search all notebooks for "example query" and list matching items
      nb search "example query" --all --list
    
      # search for items matching "Example" AND "Demo"
      nb search "Example" "Demo"
      nb search "Example" --and "Demo"
    
      # search for items matching "Example" OR "Sample"
      nb search "Example|Sample"
      nb search "Example" --or "Sample"
    
      # search with a regular expression
      nb search "\d\d\d-\d\d\d\d"
    
      # search the current notebook for "example query"
      nb q "example query"
    
      # search all notebooks for "example query" and list matching items
      nb q -la "example query"
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb q`
    

    settings

    ↑ · See also: set & settings, unset

    Usage:
      nb set [<name> [<value>] | <number> [<value>]]
      nb settings colors [<number> | themes]
      nb settings edit
      nb settings get   (<name> | <number>)
      nb settings list  [--long]
      nb settings set   (<name> | <number>) <value>
      nb settings show  (<name> | <number>)
      nb settings unset (<name> | <number>)
    
    Subcommands:
      (default)  Open the settings prompt, to <name> or <number>, if present.
                 When <value> is also present, assign <value> to the setting.
      colors     Print a table of available colors and their xterm color numbers.
                 When <number> is provided, print the number in its color.
                 `settings colors themes` prints a list of installed themes.
      edit       Open the `nb` configuration file in `$EDITOR`.
      get        Print the value of a setting.
      list       List information about available settings.
      set        Assign <value> to a setting.
      show       Print the help information and current value of a setting.
      unset      Unset a setting, returning it to the default value.
    
    Description:
      Configure `nb`. Use `nb settings set` to customize a setting and
      `nb settings unset` to restore the default for a setting.
    
      Use the `nb set` alias to quickly assign values to settings:
    
        nb set color_theme blacklight
        nb set limit 40
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#%EF%B8%8F-set--settings
    
    See Also:
      nb help unset
    
    Examples:
      nb settings
      nb set 5 "org"
      nb set color_primary 105
      nb set unset color_primary
      nb set color_secondary unset
      nb settings colors
      nb settings colors 105
      nb set limit 15
    
    Alias: `nb set`
    
    auto_sync

    ↑ · See also: Git Sync

    [1]  auto_sync
         ---------
         By default, operations that trigger a git commit like `add`, `edit`,
         and `delete` will sync notebook changes to the remote repository, if
         one is set. To disable this behavior, set this to "0".
    
         • Default Value: 1
    
    color_primary

    ↑ · See also: Color Themes, Custom Color Themes

    [2]  color_primary
         -------------
         The primary color used to highlight identifiers and messages.
    
         • Supported Values: xterm color numbers 0 through 255.
         • Default Value:    68 (blue) for 256 color terminals,
                             4  (blue) for  8  color terminals.
    
    color_secondary

    ↑ · See also: Color Themes, Custom Color Themes

    [3]  color_secondary
         ---------------
         The color used for lines and footer elements.
    
         • Supported Values: xterm color numbers 0 through 255.
         • Default Value:    8
    
    color_theme

    ↑ · See also: Color Themes

    [4]  color_theme
         -----------
         The color theme.
    
         To view screenshots of the built-in themes, visit:
    
             https://git.io/nb-docs-color-themes
    
         `nb` supports custom, user-defined themes. To learn more, run:
    
             nb help --colors
    
         To change the syntax highlighting theme, use:
    
             nb set syntax_theme
    
         • Available themes:
    
             blacklight
             console
             desert
             electro
             forest
             nb
             ocean
             raspberry
             smoke
             unicorn
             utility
    
         • Default Value: nb
    
    default_extension

    ↑ · See also: Adding

    [5]  default_extension
         -----------------
         The default extension to use for note files. Change to "org" for
         Org files, "rst" for reStructuredText, "txt" for plain text, or
         whatever you prefer.
    
         • Default Value: md
    
    editor

    ↑ · See also: Editing, Adding

    [6]  editor
         ------
         The command line text editor used by `nb`.
    
         • Example Values:
    
             atom
             code
             emacs
             macdown
             mate
             micro
             nano
             pico
             subl
             vi
             vim
    
    encryption_tool

    ↑ · See also: Password-Protected Encrypted Notes and Bookmarks

    [7]  encryption_tool
         ---------------
         The tool used for encrypting notes.
    
         • Supported Values: openssl, gpg
         • Default Value:    openssl
    
    footer

    ↑ · See also: Listing & Filtering

    [8]  footer
         ------
         By default, `nb` and `nb ls` include a footer with example commands.
         To hide this footer, set this to "0".
    
         • Default Value: 1
    
    header

    ↑ · See also: Listing & Filtering

    [9]  header
         ------
         By default, `nb` and `nb ls` include a header listing available notebooks.
         Set the alignment, or hide the header with "0".
    
         • Supported Values:
    
             0  Hide Header
             1  Dynamic Alignment
                  - Left justified when list is shorter than terminal width.
                  - Center aligned when list is longer than terminal width.
             2  Center Aligned (default)
             3  Left Justified
    
         • Default Value: 1
    
    limit

    ↑ · See also: Listing & Filtering

    [10] limit
         -----
         The maximum number of notes included in the `nb` and `nb ls` lists.
    
         • Default Value: 15
    
    nb_dir

    ↑ 

    [11] nb_dir
         ------
         The location of the directory that contains the notebooks.
    
         For example, to sync all notebooks with Dropbox, create a folder at
         `~/Dropbox/Notes` and run: `nb settings set nb_dir ~/Dropbox/Notes`
    
         • Default Value: ~/.nb
    
    syntax_theme

    ↑ · See also: Terminal Syntax Highlighting

    [12] syntax_theme
         ------------
         The syntax highlighting theme. View examples with:
    
             bat --list-themes
    
         • Available themes:
    
             1337
             DarkNeon
             Dracula
             GitHub
             Monokai Extended
             Monokai Extended Bright
             Monokai Extended Light
             Monokai Extended Origin
             Nord
             OneHalfDark
             OneHalfLight
             Solarized (dark)
             Solarized (light)
             Sublime Snazzy
             TwoDark
             ansi-dark
             ansi-light
             base16
             base16-256
             gruvbox
             gruvbox-light
             gruvbox-white
             zenburn
    
         • Default Value: base16
    

    shell

    ↑ · See also: Interactive Shell, run

    Usage:
      nb shell [<subcommand> [<options>...] | --clear-history]
    
    Options:
      --clear-history  Clear the `nb` shell history.
    
    Description:
      Start the `nb` interactive shell. Type "exit" to exit.
    
      `nb shell` recognizes all `nb` subcommands and options, providing
      a streamlined, distraction-free approach for working with `nb`.
    
      When <subcommand> is present, the command will run as the shell is opened.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-nb-interactive-shell
    
    See Also:
      nb help run
    
    Example:
      $ nb shell
      nb> ls 3
      [3] Example
    
      nb> edit 3 --content "New content."
      Updated: [3] Example
    
      nb> notebook
      home
    
      nb> exit
      $
    

    show

    ↑ · See also: Viewing, browse, open, peek

    Usage:
      nb show ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
              [[-a | --added] | [--authors] | [-b | --browse] | --filename | --id |
              --info-line | --path | [-p | --print] | --relative-path | [-r |
              --render] | --title | --type [<type>] | [-u | --updated]] [--no-color]
      nb show <notebook>
    
    Options:
      -a, --added      Print the date and time when the item was added.
      --authors        List the git commit authors of an item.
      -b, --browse     Open the item with `nb browse`.
      --filename       Print the filename of the item.
      --id             Print the id number of the item.
      --info-line      Print the id, filename, and title of the item.
      --no-color       Show without syntax highlighting.
      --path           Print the full path of the item.
      -p, --print      Print to standard output / terminal.
      --relative-path  Print the item's path relative within the notebook.
      -r, --render     Use `pandoc` [1] to render the file to HTML and display
                       in the terminal web browser. If either `pandoc` or a
                       browser are unavailable, `-r` / `--render` is ignored.
      --title          Print the title of the note.
      --type [<type>]  Print the file extension or, when <type> is specified,
                       return true if the item matches <type>. <type> can be a
                       file extension or one of the following types:
                       archive, audio, bookmark, document, folder, image,
                       text, video
      -u, --updated    Print the date and time of the last recorded change.
    
    Description:
      Show an item or notebook. Notes in text file formats can be rendered or
      printed to standard output. Non-text files are opened in your system's
      preferred app or program for that file type.
    
      By default, the item is opened using `less` or the program configured
      in the `$PAGER` environment variable. Use the following keys to navigate
      in `less` (see `man less` for more information):
    
        Key               Function
        ---               --------
        mouse scroll      Scroll up or down
        arrow up or down  Scroll one line up or down
        f                 Jump forward one window
        b                 Jump back one window
        d                 Jump down one half window
        u                 Jump up one half window
        /<query>          Search for <query>
        n                 Jump to next <query> match
        q                 Quit
    
      To skip the pager and print to standard output, use the `-p` / `--print`
      option.
    
      `-r` / `--render` automatically uses either `w3m` [2], `links` [3],
      or `lynx` [4]. To specify a preferred browser, set the `$BROWSER`
      environment variable in your .bashrc, .zshrc, or equivalent, e.g.,
      `export BROWSER="links"`.
    
      If `bat` [5], `highlight` [6], or Pygments [7] is installed, notes are
      printed with syntax highlighting.
    
        1. https://pandoc.org/
        2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W3m
        3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Links_(web_browser)
        4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(web_browser)
        5. https://github.com/sharkdp/bat
        6. http://www.andre-simon.de/doku/highlight/en/highlight.php
        7. https://pygments.org/
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#viewing
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help open
      nb help peek
    
    Examples:
      nb show 1
      nb show example.md --render
      nb show "A Document Title" --print --no-color
      nb 1 show
      nb example:show 12
      nb show example:12
      nb example:12 show
      nb s 1
      nb 1 s
      nb s example:12
      nb example:12 s
    
    Alias: `nb view`
    Shortcut Alias: `nb s`
    

    status

    ↑ · See also: Git Sync, History, archive, history, notebooks, remote, sync, unarchive

    Usage:
      nb status [<notebook>]
    
    Description:
      Print archival, git, and remote status for the current notebook or <notebook>.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-git-sync
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-revision-history
    
    See Also:
      nb help archive
      nb help history
      nb help notebooks
      nb help remote
      nb help sync
      nb help unarchive
    
    Examples:
      nb status
      nb status example
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb st`
    

    subcommands

    ↑ · See also: Plugins, plugins

    Usage:
      nb subcommands [add <name>...] [alias <name> <alias>]
                     [describe <name> <usage>]
    
    Subcommands:
      add       Add a new subcommand.
      alias     Create an <alias> of a given subcommand <name>, with linked help.
                Note that aliases must also be added with `subcommands add`.
      describe  Set the usage text displayed with `nb help <subcommand>`.
                This can be assigned as a heredoc, which is recommended, or
                as a string argument.
    
    Description:
      List, add, alias, and describe subcommands. New subcommands, aliases, and
      descriptions are not persisted, so `add`, `alias`, `describe` are
      primarily for plugins.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-plugins
    
    See Also:
      nb help plugins
    

    sync

    ↑ · See also: Git Sync, History, history, notebooks, remote, status

    Usage:
      nb sync [-a | --all]
    
    Options:
      -a, --all   Sync all unarchived notebooks.
    
    Description:
      Sync the current notebook with its remote.
    
    Private Repositories and Git Credentials:
      Syncing with private repositories requires configuring git to not prompt
      for credentials.
    
      For repositories cloned over HTTPS, credentials can be cached with git.
      For repositories cloned over SSH, keys can be added to the ssh-agent.
    
      More Information:
        https://github.com/xwmx/nb#private-repositories-and-git-credentials
    
    Sync Conflict Resolution:
      When `nb sync` encounters a conflict in a text file and can't merge
      overlapping local and remote changes, both versions are saved in the
      file, separated by git conflict markers. Use `nb edit` to remove the
      conflict markers and delete any unwanted text.
    
      When `nb sync` encounters a conflict in a binary file, such as an
      encrypted note or bookmark, both versions of the file are saved in the
      notebook as individual files, one with `--conflicted-copy` appended to
      the filename.
    
      More Information:
        https://github.com/xwmx/nb#sync-conflict-resolution
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-git-sync
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-revision-history
    
    See Also:
      nb help history
      nb help notebooks
      nb help remote
      nb help status
    
    Examples:
      nb sync
      nb sync --all
    

    unarchive

    ↑ · See also: Archiving Notebooks, archive, notebooks, status

    Usage:
      nb unarchive [<name>]
    
    Description:
      Remove "archived" status from the current notebook or notebook <name>.
    
      This is an alias for `nb notebooks unarchive`.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#archiving-notebooks
    
    See Also:
      nb help archive
      nb help notebooks
      nb help status
    
    Examples:
      nb unarchive
      nb unarchive example
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb unar`
    

    unpin

    ↑ · See also: Pinning, browse, list, ls, pin

    Usage:
      nb unpin ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
    
    Description:
      Unpin a pinned item.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-pinning
    
    See Also:
      nb help browse
      nb help list
      nb help ls
      nb help pin
    
    Examples:
      nb unpin 123
      nb unpin example:sample/321
    

    unset

    ↑ · See also: set & settings, settings

    Usage:
      nb unset (<name> | <number>)
    
    Description:
      Unset a setting, returning it to the default value.
    
      This is an alias for `nb settings unset`.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#%EF%B8%8F-set--settings
    
    See Also:
      nb help settings
    
    Examples:
      nb unset color_primary
      nb unset 2
    
    Alias: `nb reset`
    

    update

    ↑ · See also: Installation, env, version

    Usage:
      nb update
    
    Description:
      Update `nb` to the latest version. You will be prompted for
      your password if administrator privileges are required.
    
      If `nb` was installed using a package manager like npm or
      Homebrew, use the package manager's upgrade functionality instead
      of this command.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#installation
    
    See Also:
      nb help env
      nb help version
    

    use

    ↑ · See also: Notebooks, notebooks

    Usage:
      nb use <notebook>
    
    Description:
      Switch to the specified notebook. Shortcut for `nb notebooks use`.
    
    Read More:
      https://github.com/xwmx/nb#-notebooks
    
    See Also:
      nb help notebooks
    
    Example:
      nb use example
    
    Shortcut Alias: `nb u`
    

    version

    ↑ · See also: Installation, env, update

    Usage:
      nb version
    
    Description:
      Display version information.
    
    See Also:
      nb help env
      nb help update
    

    Plugins

    backlink · clip · copy · ebook · example

     ↑ 

    backlink

    ↑ 

    Usage:
      nb backlink [--force]
    
    Description:
      Add backlinks to notes. Crawl notes in a notebook for [[wiki-style links]]
      and append a "Backlinks" section to each linked file that lists passages
      referencing the note.
    
      To link to a note from within another note, surround the title of the
      target note in double square brackets:
    
          Example with link to [[Target Note Title]] in content.
    
      Depends on note-link-janitor:
        https://github.com/andymatuschak/note-link-janitor
    
        Requirement: every note in the notebook must have a title.
    

    clip

    ↑ 

    Usage:
      nb clip [<notebook>:][<id> | <filename> | <path> | <title> | <extension>]
    
    Description:
      Save the clipboard contents and copy contents of text or markdown items to
      the clipboard.
    
      When called with no arguments or when no matching file is found, the text
      content on the clipboard is saved to a new file, pending a prompt.
    
    Examples:
      # copy the content of item 123 to the clipboard
      nb clip 123
    
      # save the clipboard contents to a new file with a `.js` file extension
      nb clip .js
    

    copy

    ↑ 

    Usage:
      nb copy ([<notebook>:][<folder-path>/][<id> | <filename> | <title>])
    
    Description:
      Create a copy of the specified item in the current notebook.
    
    Alias: `nb duplicate`
    

    ebook

    ↑ 

    Usage:
      nb ebook new <name>
      nb ebook publish
    
    Subcommands:
      ebook new      Create a new notebook initialized with placeholder files for
                     authoring an ebook.
      ebook publish  Generate a .epub file using the current notebook contents.
    
    Description:
      Ebook authoring with `nb`.
    
      `nb ebook new` creates a notebook populated with initial placeholder files
      for creating an ebook. Edit the title page and chapters using normal `nb`
      commands, then use `nb ebook publish` to generate an epub file.
    
      Chapters are expected to be markdown files with sequential numeric
      filename prefixes for ordering:
    
        01-example.md
        02-sample.md
        03-demo.md
    
      Create new chapters with `nb add`:
    
        nb add --filename "04-chapter4.md"
    
      title.txt contains the book metadata in a YAML block. For more information
      about the fields for this file, visit:
    
        https://pandoc.org/MANUAL.html#epub-metadata
    
      stylesheet.css contains base styling for the generated ebook. It can be used
      as it is and can also be edited using `nb edit`.
    
      As with all `nb` notebooks, changes are recorded automatically in git,
      providing automatic version control for all ebook content, source, and
      metadata files.
    
      Generated epub files are saved in the notebook and can be previewed in the
      terminal with `nb show`. Export a generated epub file with `nb export`:
    
        nb export 12 .
    
    More info:
      https://pandoc.org/epub.html
    

    example

    ↑ 

    Usage:
      nb example
    
    Description:
      Print "Hello, World!"
    

    Specifications

    ↑ 

    nb Markdown Bookmark File Format

    Extension

    .bookmark.md

    Description

    nb bookmarks are Markdown documents created using a combination of user input and data from the bookmarked page. The nb bookmark format is intended to be readable, editable, convertible, renderable, and clearly organized for greatest accessibility.

    Bookmarks are identified by a .bookmark.md file extension. The bookmark URL is the first URL in the file within < and > characters. To create a minimally valid bookmark file with nb add:

    nb add example.bookmark.md --content "<https://example.com>"

    This creates a file with the name example.bookmark.md containing:

    <https://example.com>

    In a full bookmark, information is separated into sections, with each bookmark section indicated by a Markdown h2 heading.

    Example

    # Example Title (example.com)
    
    <https://example.com>
    
    ## Description
    
    Example description.
    
    ## Quote
    
    > Example quote line one.
    >
    > Example quote line two.
    
    ## Comment
    
    Example comment.
    
    ## Related
    
    - <https://example.net>
    - <https://example.org>
    
    ## Tags
    
    #tag1 #tag2
    
    ## Content
    
    Example Title
    =============
    
    This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
    use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
    permission.
    
    [More information\...](https://www.iana.org/domains/example)
    
    ## Source
    
    ```html
    <!doctype html>
    <html>
      <head>
        <title>Example Title</title>
        <meta name="description" content="Example description." />
      </head>
    
      <body>
        <h1>Example Title</h1>
        <p>
          This domain is for use in illustrative examples in documents. You may
          use this domain in literature without prior coordination or asking for
          permission.
        </p>
        <p>
          <a href="https://www.iana.org/domains/example">More information...</a>
        </p>
      </body>
    </html>
    ```

    Elements

    Title

    Optional

    A markdown h1 heading containing the content of the bookmarked page's HTML <title> or og:title tag, if present, followed by the domain within parentheses.

    Examples
    # Example Title (example.com)
    # (example.com)
    URL

    Required

    The URL of the bookmarked resource, with surrounding angle brackets (<, >).

    This is the only required element.

    ## Description

    Optional

    A text element containing the content of the bookmarked page's meta description or og:description tag, if present.

    ## Quote

    Optional

    A markdown quote block containing a user-specified excerpt from the bookmarked resource.

    ## Comment

    Optional

    A text element containing a comment written by the user.

    ## Related

    Optional

    A Markdown list of angle bracketed (<, >) URLs that are related to the bookmarked resource.

    ## Tags

    Optional

    A list of tags represented as #hashtags separated by individual spaces.

    ## Content

    Optional

    The full content of the bookmarked page, converted to Markdown.

    The ## Content section makes the page content available locally for full-text search and viewing of page content. The source HTML is converted to inline Markdown to reduce the amount of markup, make it more readable, and make page conent easily viewable in the terminal as markdown and streamlined HTML in terminal web browsers.

    ## Source

    Optional

    A fenced code block with html language identifier containing the source HTML from the bookmarked page.

    nb does not save the page source by default. nb uses this section to save the source HTML page content when pandoc is not available to convert it to Markdown.

    nb Notebook Specification

    An nb notebook is a directory that contains a valid .git directory, indicating that it has been initialized as a git repository, and a .index file in the root directory.

    .index Files

    A notebook folder index is a text file named .index in any folder within the notebook directory. .index contains a list of visible filenames within the folder, one per line, and the line number of each filename represents the id. .index files are included in the git repository so ids are preserved across systems.

    Operations
    add
    Append a new line containing the filename to .index.
    update
    Overwrite the existing filename in .index with the new filename.
    delete
    Delete the filename, preserving the newline, leaving the line blank.
    reconcile
    Remove duplicate lines, preserving existing blank lines, add entries for new files, and delete entries for deleted files.
    rebuild
    Delete and rebuild .index, listing files by most recently modified, reversed.
    index Subcommand

    nb manages the .index of each folder within a notebook using an internal index subcommand.

    nb help index
    Usage:
      nb index add <filename>
      nb index delete <filename>
      nb index get_basename <id>
      nb index get_id <filename>
      nb index get_max_id
      nb index rebuild [--ancestors]
      nb index reconcile [--ancestors]
      nb index show
      nb index update <existing-filename> <new-filename>
      nb index verify
      nb index <subcommand> <options>... [<folder-path>]
    
    Options:
      --ancestors   Perform the action on all folders within the notebook that
                    are ancestors of the current folder.
    
    Subcommands:
      add           Add <filename> to the index.
      delete        Delete <filename> from the index.
      get_basename  Print the filename / basename at the specified <id>.
      get_id        Get the id for <filename>.
      get_max_id    Get the maximum id for the folder.
      rebuild       Rebuild the index, listing files by last modified, reversed.
                    Some ids will change. Prefer `nb index reconcile`.
      reconcile     Remove duplicates and update index for added and deleted files.
      show          Print the index.
      update        Overwrite the <existing-filename> entry with <new-filename>.
      verify        Verify that the index matches the folder contents.
    
    Description:
      Manage the index for the current folder or the folder at <folder-path>,
      which can be passed as the final argument to any `index` subcommand.
    
      `index` is used internally by `nb` and using it manually will
      probably corrupt the index. If something goes wrong with an index,
      fix it with `nb index reconcile`.
    
      An index is a text file named '.index' in any folder within a notebook.
      .index contains a list of filenames and the line number of each filename
      represents the id. .index files are included in the git repository so
      ids are preserved across systems.
    

    .pindex Files

    Any folder may contain an optional plain text file named .pindex containing a list of basenames from that folder, one per line, that should be treated as pinned, meaning they appear first in some list operations, including nb and nb ls. Entries are added to a .pindex file with nb pin and removed with nb unpin.

    Archived Notebooks

    A notebook is considered archived when it contains a file named .archived at the root level of the notebook directory.

    Tests

    With more than 1,700 tests spanning tens of thousands of lines, nb is really mostly a test suite. Tests run continuously via GitHub Actions on recent versions of both Ubuntu and macOS to account for differences between BSD and GNU tools and Bash versions. To run the tests locally, install Bats and the recommended dependencies, then run bats test within the project root directory. Run groups of tests with globbing, e.g., bats test/browse* and bats test/folders*.

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    Copyright (c) 2015-present William Melody · See LICENSE for details.

    github.com/xwmx/nb

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    npm i nb.sh

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