matches

Powerful pattern matching for Javascript

matches.js

Matches.js brings the power and expressiveness of pattern matching to Javascript.

Matches.js exports one function, pattern.

var pattern = require("matches").pattern;

The simplest way is to give it an object with the keys being patterns, and the values being functions. Each pattern will be tried in order until a match is found.

var arrayElems = pattern({
  '[]'function () { 
    return "This array is empty."; 
  },
  '[x]'function (x) { 
    return "This array has one element: " + x; 
  },
  '[x, y]'function (xy) { 
    return "This array has two elements: " + x + " and " + y;
  },
  '[x, y, ...]'function (xy) {
    return "This array is long. The first two elements are: " + x + " and " + y;
  }
});
 
arrayElems([1, 2, 3]);

You can create individual pattern and function pairs.

var emptyArray = pattern('[]', function () { return "Empty array" });
 
// "Empty array" 
emptyArray([]);
 
// TypeError: "All patterns exhausted" 
emptyArray(12);

You can also create your own custom pattern functions. The patternFn takes an array of arguments, and should return false for no match, or a new array of arguments to forward on to the successFn.

var greater42 = function (args) {
  if (args[0] >= 42) return [args[0]];
  return false;
};
 
var customPattern = pattern(greater42, function (x) {
  console.log(x);
});
 
// Logs 54 
customPattern(54);
 
// TypeError: "All patterns exhausted" 
customPattern(12);

You can combine any of these methods to create unique match chains using the alt combinator.

 
var wildcard = pattern('_', function () { return "No matches."; });
var mychain = pattern('1', function () { return "One"; })
  .alt({
    '2'function () { return "Two"; },
    '3'function () { return "Three"; }
  })
  .alt(wildcard);
 
// 'One' 
mychain(1);
 
// 'Two' 
mychain(2);
 
// 'No matches.' 
mychain(5);

Separate matches for multiple arguments with a comma. Since you can pass any number of arguments to functions in Javascript, Matches.js is not strict and will happily combine patterns for varying numbers of arguments.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Matches on the first three arguments. If more are passed, they are ignored. 
  '1, "foo", [a, ...]'function (a) { return a; },
 
  // Matches on the first two arguments, ignoring the rest 
  'a, fn@Function'function (afn) { return fn(a); },
 
  // Matches anything 
  '_'function () { return null; }
});
 
// 12 
myfn(6, function (x) { return x * 2; }, "foo", "bar");
 
// null 
myfn(1, 2, 3, 4);

Pattern strings are compiled to pure Javascript functions and then cached. So beyond initial creation for the first instance of a pattern string, there is very little overhead. Unless you programmatically create dynamic patterns, you should only see a slight hit at the start of your application as the patterns are compiled. Benchmarks coming soon.

Check for specific values using number or string literals, null, or undefined.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Null 
  'null' : function () {...},
 
  // Undefined 
  'undefined' : function () {...},
 
  // Numbers 
  '42'    : function () { ... },
  '12.6'  : function () { ... },
  '1e+42' : function () { ... },
 
  // Strings 
  '"foo"' : function () { ... },
 
  // Escape sequences must be double escaped. 
  '"This string \\n matches \\n newlines."' : function () { ... }
});

Underscores will match successfully on any value but ignore it. A single underscore works well as a catch all pattern.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Match if second argument is 12, ignoring the first 
  '_, 12' : function () { ... },
 
  // Match on anything 
  '_' : function () { ... }
});

Patterns that start with lowercase letters will pass the value to the function. Values are passed to the function in the same right to left order they are declared in the pattern.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Pass on the second argument if the first is 12 
  '12, x'function (x) { ... },
 
  // Pass on the first and third argument, ignoring the second 
  'x, _, y'function (xy) { ... }
});

Match on the entire array, or only a few values.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Empty array 
  '[]' : function () { ... },
 
  // Strict comparison on contents 
  '[1, 2, 3]'function () { ... },
 
  // Grab the first value, ignoring the rest 
  '[x, ...]'function (x) { ... },
 
  // Split it into a head and tail 
  '[head, tail...]'function (headtail) { ... },
 
  // Grab the first and last items, ignoring the middle 
  '[x, ..., y]'function (xy) { ... },
 
  // Grab the last item 
  '[..., last]'function (last) { ... },
 
  // Make a shallow clone 
  '[clone...]'function (clone) { ... },
 
  // Grab the first item, but also pass on the whole array 
  'arr@[first, ...]'function (arrfirst) { ... }
});

Matches.js currently supports strict object comparison, meaning it will match if the object contains the specified keys and no others.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Empty object 
  '{}'function () { ... },
 
  // Check that an object has only two keys 'x' and 'y', and pass to the function 
  '{x, y}'function (xy) { ... },
 
  // Check that an object has a key that contains an array 
  '{children: [a, b, ...], other: _}'function (ab) { ... }
})

Typecheck arguments using Number, String, Date, RegExp, Function, Array, or Object.

var myfn = pattern({
  // Takes a function and an array 
  'fn@Function, arr@Array'function (fnarr) { ... },
 
  // Takes a function and an object 
  'fn@Function, obj@Object'function (fnobj) { ... }
});

Matches.js has builtin support for adt.js types. Adt.js is a library for building algebraic data types in Javascript.

// Create a new adt.js type 
var Tree = adt.data({
  Empty : adt.single(),
  Node  : adt.record("val", "left", "right")
});
 
var mytree = Tree.Node(12, Tree.Empty(), Tree.Node(42, Tree.Empty(), Tree.Empty()));
 
var myfn = pattern({
  // Match on an Empty tree node 
  'Empty'function () { ... },
 
  // Match on a Node with a value of 12 
  'Node(12, _, _)'function () { ... },
 
  // Match on a Node that has non-Empty children 
  'Node(_, Node, Node)'function () { ... }
 
  // Match on a Node that has a left child Node of 42 and an Empty right node 
  'Node(val, Node(42, _, _), Empty)'function (val) { ... }
});

Find out more about adt.js: https://github.com/natefaubion/adt.js