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    ifc2

    1.0.22 • Public • Published

    ifc2

    A Javascript client for the Infinite Flight simulator Connect API version 2

    Table of Contents

    Installing ifc2

    ifc2 is available as a Node module on npmjs.com and can simply be installed with:

    npm install ifc2
    

    Using the API

    Connecting to the Infinite Flight Connect v2 API

    Infinite Flight Connect v2 is a built-in API that allows you to send commands to Infinite Flight. You must enable it in Infinite Flight Settings > General > "Enable Infinite Flight Connect".

    An older Connect v1 API still exists and is available in Infinite Flight -- however it is less efficient for many use cases that need to retrieve and/or set states in Infinite Flight at high speed. The ifc JavaScript client offers an interface to the Connect v1 API.

    Including ifc2 in your scripts/applications

    To use ifc2 you need to include it in your scripts:

    let IFC2 = require("ifc2");
    

    Or, if you aren't installing with npm then you can simply clone this repository and directly reference ifc2.js:

    let IFC2 = require("/path/to/ifc2.js);
    

    Initialisation

    To initialise ifc2 and connect to an Infinite Flight device you use the init function. The init function takes the following arguments:

    init(successCallback, {params})

    • successCallback is the function to be executed after the connection has been established with Infinite Flight
    • params is an optional parameter which allows you to configure and control various aspects of the module, including:
      • callback is a boolean value indicating if callback functions should be used to return values instead of the standard ifc2 event model; default is false
      • infoCallback is a function to use as callback when ifc2 fetches certain default information during initialisation (such as livery); if this function is not provided when callback is true, it will default to an empty function that takes no action
      • pollThrottle is an integer value specifying how many milliseconds to wait between each polling request to Infinite Flight; default is 0
      • enableLog is a boolean value to enable/disable logging in the Module; default is false
      • loggingLevel is an integer value for logging level in the module (2: INFO, 1: WARN, 0: ERROR); default is 0 (ERROR)
      • keepAlive is a boolean value indicating if the socket connection should have TCP keep alive enabled; default is false
      • doReconnect is a boolean value indicating if ifc2 should attempt to reconnect the socket connection when the connection generates an error; default is true
      • timeout is an integer value indicating if the socket connection should generate timeout events after a set number of milliseconds -- no timeouts occur if set to 0; default is 0
      • host is the IP address of a device running Infinite Flight to which you want to connect without polling for UDP broadcasts from Infinite Flight; if not set the module will wait for a UDP broadcast to determine which device to connect to
      • port is the port to use when manually connecting to a device running Infinite Flight without polling for UDP broadcasts from Infinite Flight; if not set the module will wait for a UDP broadcast to determine which device to connect to

    Example :

    IFC2.init(
      function() {
        console.log("IFC connected");
        IFC2.get("aircraft/0/pitch");
      },
      {
        "enableLog": true,
        "loggingLevel": 1,
        "host": "192.168.2.123",
        "port": 10112
      }
    )
    

    If you do not include a host and port, ifc2 will search your local network for an active Infinite Flight device and connect to the first device to respond.

    Using the Infinite Flight Connect API through ifc2

    Using the Manifest

    Version 2 of the Infinite Flight Connect API uses a manifest to specify what statuses and commands are available for any specific aircraft. After connecting to Infinite Flight, ifc2 will fetch the manifest for your aircraft before becoming ready for use.

    Once the manifest is successfully retrieved, ifc2 will emit and IFC2manifest event which you can use in your script to respond to the manifest being fetched. The even will return an object containing the manifest. The manifest object will contain a series of objects where the key is the commnd name. Each of these object will contain two properties:

    • command: The numeric command used when invoking the command through the API
    • type: An integer specifying the data type used by the command when you data is sent/received to/from the API

    The data types are:

    • 0: Boolean
    • 1: Four-byte integer
    • 2: Floating point number
    • 3: Double-length floating point number
    • 4: String
    • 5: Long string

    An example of the manifest looks like this:

    {
      'infiniteflight/cameras/14/roll': { command: 891, type: 3 },
      'aircraft/0/systems/nav_sources/adf/2/distance_to_glide_path': { command: 515, type: 2 },
      'infiniteflight/cameras/2/z_angle': { command: 782, type: 3 },
      'infiniteflight/cameras/4/x_angle': { command: 804, type: 3 },
      'api_joystick/buttons/8/name': { command: 81, type: 4 },
      'api_joystick/buttons/47/name': { command: 159, type: 4 },
      'aircraft/0/systems/nav_sources/nav/4/distance_to_glide_path': { command: 461, type: 2 },
      'api_joystick/buttons/30/value': { command: 126, type: 1 },
      'aircraft/0/systems/nav_sources/nav/2/location/longitude': { command: 389, type: 3 },
      ...
    }
    

    You can handle the IFC2manifest event by using the on method of your ifc2 object. For example:

    IFC2.on("IFC2manifest", function(manifest) {
      // You can respond to the IFC2manifest event here -- the manifest object will be in the "manifest" variab;e
    });
    

    Getting states from Infinite Flight

    The majority of the commands in the manifest allow you to retrieve state information from various aircraft information and systems.

    Some examples of this are:

    • aircraft/0/heading_magnetic: Returns the (magnetic) heading in radians as a floating point number
    • aircraft/0/altitude_msl: Returns the altitude relative to sea level in feet as an integer
    • aircraft/0/bank: Returns the bank angle in radians as a floating point number
    • aircraft/0/flightplan: Returns the current flight plan (if any) as a string

    You can fetch states by using the get function and passing the command name from the manifest as a parameter to the function. For instance, to fetch the bank angle, you would use:

    IFC2.get("aircraft/0/bank");
    

    When fetching states, the ifc2 module treats this as an asynchronous activity to avoid blocking while waiting for a response from Infinite Flight. When ifc2 receives a response, by default it will emit an IFC2data event and return a data object containing two properties:

    • command: The name of the command being returned
    • data: The value returned by Infinite Flight for the command

    In this case, we could simply log the data returned by the event like this:

    IFC2.on("IFC2data", function(data) {
      console.log(data);
    });
    

    If we had sent the aircraft/0/bank command as in the example above, the resulting console output displayed when we receive the associated IFC2data event would look like this:

    { command: 'aircraft/0/bank', data: 0.0004447073442861438 }
    

    ifc2 offers an alternative to events using callback functions which is discussed below

    Additionally, all state values fetched from Infinite Flight are stored in the ifData property of the ifc2 object. At any time, this object will have one entry for each state ever fetched since ifc2 was instantiated and will contain the last fetched value for that state along with a timestamp. The timestamp will be represented as a UNIX-style time stamp.

    This allows you to get a list of all states you have ever requested and their most recent fetched values. For instance, the following code snip requests the bank and pitch and outputs the ifData object each time the IFC2data event is triggered:

    IFC2.on("IFC2data", function(data) {
      console.log(IFC2.ifData);
    });
    
    IFC2.get("aircraft/0/bank");
    IFC2.get("aircraft/0/pitch");
    

    The output would look like this:

    {
      'aircraft/0/bank': { data: 0.0004445366212166846, ts: 1640273977393 }
    }
    {
      'aircraft/0/bank': { data: 0.0004445366212166846, ts: 1640273977393 },
      'aircraft/0/pitch': { data: 0.004999594762921333, ts: 1640273977399 }
    }
    

    Additionally, immediately after connecting to an Infinite Flight device, ifc2 will fetch the following states and add them to ifData so they will be available shortly after connection to provide context about the Infinite Flight device and aircraft being used:

    infiniteflight/app_state
    infiniteflight/app_version
    infiniteflight/api_version
    aircraft/0/name
    aircraft/0/livery
    

    Each of these requests will generate an IFC2data event when the API returns the relevant data to ifc2 and the data will be available in ifData.

    Setting states in Infinite Flight

    Many of the state commands in a manifest can also be used to set a state such as changing the position of flaps.

    You can set states by using the set function and passing the command name from the manifest and a new values for the state as aparameters to the function. For instance, to fetch the flap position to 3 you could use the following:

    IFC2.set("aircraft/0/systems/flaps/state",3);
    

    Not all states can be set but there is no indication in the manifest of which states can be set nor is the set of states which can be set consistent for each aircraft. Also, Infinite Flight doesn't return any confirmation after a state is set so the only way to determine if a state is successfully set is to fetch the state after setting it and seeing if is updated/changed.

    Running commands in Infinite Flight

    In addition to the state commands used by the get and set functions in ifc2, the API offers a set of special commands which can been issued to Infinite Flight to perform tasks commonly performed through the user interface of Infinite Flight -- tasks such as toggling the parking brakes or the autopilot state.

    These are distringuished in the manifest by two attributes:

    • The command names start with commands/
    • The data type is -1 indicating there is no data to send or receive

    A representative list of these commands is:

    • commands/ElevatorTrimUp
    • commands/ElevatorTrimDown
    • commands/ThrottleUpCommand
    • commands/ThrottleDownCommand
    • commands/SetThrottleCommand
    • commands/SetCockpitCamera
    • commands/SetVirtualCockpitCameraCommand
    • commands/SetFollowCameraCommand
    • commands/SetFlyByCamera
    • commands/SetOnboardCameraCommand
    • commands/SetTowerCameraCommand
    • commands/NextCamera
    • commands/PrevCamera
    • commands/CameraMoveLeft
    • commands/CameraMoveRight
    • commands/CameraMoveDown
    • commands/CameraMoveUp
    • commands/CameraMoveHorizontal
    • commands/CameraMoveVertical
    • commands/CameraZoomIn
    • commands/CameraZoomOut
    • commands/Reset
    • commands/ShowATCWindowCommand
    • commands/ATCEntry1
    • commands/ATCEntry2
    • commands/ATCEntry3
    • commands/ATCEntry4
    • commands/ATCEntry5
    • commands/ATCEntry6
    • commands/ATCEntry7
    • commands/ATCEntry8
    • commands/ATCEntry9
    • commands/ATCEntry10
    • commands/Live.SetCOMFrequencies
    • commands/FlightPlan.AddWaypoints
    • commands/FlightPlan.Clear
    • commands/FlightPlan.ActivateLeg
    • commands/Brakes
    • commands/ParkingBrakes
    • commands/FlapsDown
    • commands/FlapsUp
    • commands/FlapsFullDown
    • commands/FlapsFullUp
    • commands/Aircraft.SetFlapState
    • commands/Spoilers
    • commands/LandingGear
    • commands/Pushback
    • commands/FuelDump
    • commands/ReverseThrust
    • commands/LandingLights
    • commands/TaxiLights
    • commands/StrobeLights
    • commands/BeaconLights
    • commands/NavLights
    • commands/SetLandingLightsState
    • commands/SetTaxiLightsState
    • commands/SetStrobeLightsState
    • commands/SetBeaconLightsState
    • commands/SetNavLightsState
    • commands/Autopilot.Toggle
    • commands/Autopilot.SetState
    • commands/Autopilot.SetHeading
    • commands/Autopilot.SetAltitude
    • commands/Autopilot.SetVS
    • commands/Autopilot.SetSpeed
    • commands/Autopilot.SetHeadingState
    • commands/Autopilot.SetAltitudeState
    • commands/Autopilot.SetVSState
    • commands/Autopilot.SetSpeedState
    • commands/Autopilot.SetApproachModeState
    • commands/Autopilot.SetLNavApproachModeState
    • commands/ToggleHUD
    • commands/ToggleFlightPathVector
    • commands/AutoStart
    • commands/TogglePause
    • commands/Selection Mode
    • commands/Rotation Mode
    • commands/Translation Mode
    • commands/Delete Selected
    • commands/Engine.Start
    • commands/Engine.Stop

    In ifc2 you can use these commands with the run function as in this example to toggle the parking brakes:

    IFC2.run("commands/ParkingBrakes");
    

    Events

    The module emits the following events:

    • IFC2data: Emitted when data is returned by the API; the event returns the results from the API to listeners as a JSON object.
    • IFC2manifest: Emitted after the manifest is retrieved; the event returns the manifest to the listener as a JSON object.
    • IFC2msg: Emmitted when the ifc2 module needs to send a log message to the calling script; the event returns a JSON object containing the message and the log level of the message to the listener.

    The following is an example of binding an event to the IFC2Data events in a calling scripts:

    var IFC2 = require("ifc2");
    
    IFC2.eventEmitter.addListener('IFC2data', function(data) {
      // perform actions on the data
      console.log(data);
    });
    

    Polling

    Some applications will need to regularly retrieve state information from Infinite Flight.

    To enable this, ifc2 offers a polling mechanism which allows you to register a list of states to retrieve on rolling, sequential basis.

    The polling mechanism simply works through the list of states in order they are registered -- when it receives the value of a state, it requests the next in the list and moves to the next when that state is returned by Infinite Flight. When it gets to the end of the list it returns to the start of the list and continues.

    To register a state in the polling list, use the pollRegister function:

    IFC2.pollRegister("aircraft/0/heading_magnetic");
    IFC2.pollRegister("aircraft/0/bank");
    

    As with the get function, each time a value is returned by Infinite Flight during the polling, an IFC2data event will be emitted. Also, the last retrieved value for each state will be stored and retained in the ifData data object for future reference.

    ifc2 offers an alternative to events using callback functions which is discussed below

    ifc2 will continue to poll for the states in the polling queue until either they are deregistered or ifc2 disconnects from Infinite Flight`.

    You can register a command from the polling list with the pollDeregister function:

    IFC2.pollRegister("aircraft/0/heading_magnetic");
    

    Although this means ifc2 will stop polling the state, the last retrieved value for the state will persist in the ifData data objects.

    Throttling

    By default, polling happens without delays. That means as soon as ifc2 receives back a response from Infinite Flight from a poll request, it immeidately sends the next request in the polling queue. That means a very high rate of requests to Infinite Flight and a very high rate of results being returned.

    For some applications you may want to throttle the polling mechanism and insert a fixed delay between receiving a response and sending the next polling request. You do this by specifying the pollThrottle parameter when initialising ifc2.

    For instance, to wait 100 milliseconds before seconding the next request in the polling queue, you specify this when initialising:

    IFC2.init(
      function() {
        console.log("IFC connected");
        IFC2.get("aircraft/0/pitch");
      },
      {
        "pollThrottle": 100,
        "enableLog": true,
        "loggingLevel": 1,
        "host": "192.168.2.123",
        "port": 10112
      }
    )
    

    Keep in mind that if you are polling multiple states, this can lead to a significant delay for getting updates to a specific state.

    For instance, consider registering five states for polling:

    IFC2.pollRegister('aircraft/0/latitude');
    IFC2.pollRegister('aircraft/0/longitude');
    IFC2.pollRegister('aircraft/0/bank');
    IFC2.pollRegister('aircraft/0/pitch');
    IFC2.pollRegister('aircraft/0/altitude_msl');
    

    This means that the polling works sequentially like this:

    • Fetch aircraft/0/latitude
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/longitude
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/bank
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/pitch
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/altitude_msl
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/latitude
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/longitude
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/bank
    • Once a response is recceived, fetch aircraft/0/pitch
    • etc.

    If a pollThrottle value is set to 100 this means the following will happen:

    • Fetch aircraft/0/latitude
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/longitude
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/bank
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/pitch
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/altitude_msl
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/latitude
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/longitude
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/bank
    • Once a response is recceived, wait for 100 millisecnds and then fetch aircraft/0/pitch
    • etc.

    As a result, this means that there will be at least a 500 millisecond delay between requests for aircraft/0/latitude, at least a 500 millisecond delay between requests for aircraft/0/longitude, and the same for all the states in the polling queue.

    Callbacks

    By default, ifc2 returns state values to the calling script by emitting the IFC2data event. However, some use cases are better serverd by using callbacks. For this reason, ifc2 offers an alternate callback mechanism.

    Using callbacks instead of events is an either-or proposition. When you choose to use callbacks, the IFC2data event will not be emitted by ifc2.

    While the IFC2data event is not emitted, the IFC2manifest and IFC2msg events will still be emitted.

    To use callbacks to receive state data returned by Infinite Flight requires three steps:

    1. Set the callback parameter when initialising ifc2

    2. Provide an callback function to handle default state information fetched by ifc2 during initialisation such as aircraft/0/livery

    3. Specify a callback function when invoking get or pollRegister

    Initialising ifc2 to Use Callbacks

    To use callbacks make sure you set the callback parameter to true and provide an callback function with the infoCallback parameter:

    IFC2.init(
      function() {
        console.log("IFC connected");
        IFC2.get("aircraft/0/pitch");
      },
      {
        "callback": true,
        "infoCallback": (result) => { console.log(result); }
        "enableLog": true,
        "loggingLevel": 1,
        "host": "192.168.2.123",
        "port": 10112
      }
    )
    

    The callback function set in infoCallback will be invoked when Infinite Flight returns each of the following five values which ifc2 requests during initialisation:

    infiniteflight/app_state
    infiniteflight/app_version
    infiniteflight/api_version
    aircraft/0/name
    aircraft/0/livery
    

    If you don't want to handle and take action with these values when they returned, leave out the infoCallback parameter since by default ifc2 will use an empty function for this callback.

    Provide a Callback Function to get and pollRegister

    Both the get and pollRegister functions accept a callback function as a second parameter. When using callback functions instead of events, this is a required parameter as in these examples:

    IFC2.get('aircraft/0/pitch', (result) => { console.log(result); });
    IFC2.polLRegister('aircraft/0/pitch', (result) => { console.log(result); });
    

    Dependencies

    ifc2 depends on the following npm/Node packages:

    • dgram - core Node module: For listening for UDP broadcast messages from Infinite Flight
    • net - core Node module: For establishing TCP socket connections with Infinite Flight to communicate with the Connect v2 API
    • events - core Node module: For emitting events to calling scripts
    • stringview - npm module: Extends Node data views to support string data types

    Applications using ifc2

    The following applications are using ifc2 and have asked for a link from this README:

    • PanelNinja: A Windows and Mac OS tool for displaying instrument panels for Infinite Flight flights.

    If you are using ifc2 and would like to have your application listed here, submit a query through the FlightSim Ninja support site or contact the author (@likeablegeek) by a direct message in the Infinite Flight Community.

    Copyright and License

    This version is ifc2 Copyright 2022, @likeablegeek. Distributed by FlightSim Ninja.

    You may not use this work/module/file except in compliance with the License. Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. See the License for the specific language governing permissions and limitations under the License.

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