idb-wrapper

A cross-browser wrapper for IndexedDB

About

This is a wrapper for indexedDB. It is meant to

a) ease the use of indexedDB and abstract away the differences between the existing impls in Chrome, Firefox and IE10 (yes, it works in all three), and

b) show how IDB works. The code is split up into short methods, so that it's easy to see what happens in what method.

"Showing how it works" is the main intention of this project. IndexedDB is all the buzz, but only a few people actually know how to use it.

The code in IDBWrapper.js is not optimized for anything, nor minified or anything. It is meant to be read and easy to understand. So, please, go ahead and check out the source!

There are two tutorials to get you up and running:

Part 1: Setup and CRUD operations http://jensarps.de/2011/11/25/working-with-idbwrapper-part-1/

Part 2: Running Queries against the store http://jensarps.de/2012/11/13/working-with-idbwrapper-part-2/

##November Rewrite

I rewrote IDBWrapper to cope with all the issues, and the new version is on master since Nov, 13th 2012. The API didn't change much, I just removed some of the methods. Method signatures remain unchanged.

However, if you have a previous version of IDBWrapper in use, there's an issue: The new version won't be able to access the store created with the old version, because database names changed. In that case, you need to manually migrate the data: Include both versions of IDBWrapper (use a different name for them), do a getAll() on the old store and write the data to the new store.

I am very sorry about any inconveniences, but there was no other way.

The 'old' version of IDBWrapper is still available in the legacy branch: https://github.com/jensarps/IDBWrapper/tree/legacy

Also, "showing how it works" is no longer the main intention behind this. Now, it's rather "just works".

Examples

There are some examples to run right in your browser over here: http://jensarps.github.com/IDBWrapper/example/

The source for these examples are in the example folder of this repository.

Usage

Including the IDBStore.js file will add an IDBStore constructor to the global scope.

Alternatively, you can use an AMD loader such as RequireJS to load the file, and you will receive the constructor in your load callback (the constructor will then, of course, have whatever name you call it).

You can then create an IDB store:

var myStore = new IDBStore();

You may pass two parameters to the constructor: the first is an object with optional parameters, the second is a function reference to a function that is called when the store is ready to use.

The options object may contain the following properties (default values are shown):

{
  storeName: 'Store',
  dbVersion: 1,
  keyPath: 'id',
  autoIncrement: true,
  indexes: [],
  onStoreReadyfunction(){}
}

'keyPath' is the name of the property to be used as key index. If 'autoIncrement' is set to true, the database will automatically add a unique key to the keyPath index when storing objects missing that property. 'indexes' contains objects defining indexes (see below for details on indexes).

You can also pass a callback function to the options object. If a callback is provided both as second parameter and inside of the options object, the function passed as second parameter will be used.

Methods

Here's an overview of available methods in IDBStore:

Use the following methods to read and write data:


  1. The put method.
put(/*Object*/ dataObj, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

dataObj is the Object to store. onSuccess will be called when the insertion/update was successful, and it will receive the keyPath value (the id, so to say) of the inserted object as first and only argument. onError will be called if the insertion/update failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument. If the store already contains an object with the given keyPath id, it will be overwritten by dataObj.


  1. The get method.
get(/*keyPath value*/ key, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

key is the keyPath property value (the id) of the object to retrieve. onSuccess will be called if the get operation was successful, and it will receive the stored object as first and only argument. If no object was found with the given keyPath value, this argument will be null. onError will be called if the get operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.


  1. The getAll method.
getAllfunction(/*Function?*/onSuccess/*Function?*/onError)

onSuccess will be called if the getAll operation was successful, and it will receive an Array of all objects currently stored in the store as first and only argument. onError will be called if the getAll operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.


  1. The remove method.
removefunction(/*keyPath value*/ key/*Function?*/onSuccess/*Function?*/onError)

key is the keyPath property value (the id) of the object to remove. onSuccess will be called if the remove operation was successful, and it should receive false as first and only argument if the object to remove was not found, and true if it was found and removed.

NOTE: FF 8 will pass the key to the onSuccess handler, no matter if there is an corresponding object or not. Chrome 15 will pass null if removal was successful, and call the error handler if the object wasn't found. Chrome 17 will behave as described above.

onError will be called if the remove operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.


  1. The clear method.
clearfunction(/*Function?*/onSuccess/*Function?*/onError)

onSuccess will be called if the clear operation was successful. onError will be called if the clear operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.

To create indexes, you need to pass the index information to the IDBStore() constructor, for example:

{
  storeName: 'customers',
  dbVersion: 1,
  keyPath: 'customerid',
  autoIncrement: true,
  onStoreReadyfunction(){},
  indexes: [
    { name: 'lastname', keyPath: 'lastname', unique: false, multiEntry: false }
  ]
}

An entry in the index Array is an object containing the following properties:

The name property is the identifier of the index. If you want to work with the created index later, this name is used to identify the index. This is the only property that is mandatory.

The keyPath property is the name of the property in your stored data that you want to index. If you omit that, IDBWrapper will assume that it is the same as the provided name, and will use this instead.

The unique property tells the store whether the indexed property in your data is unique. If you set this to true, it will add a uniqueness constraint to the store which will make it throw if you try to store data that violates that constraint. If you omit that, IDBWrapper will set this to false.

The multiEntry property is kinda weird. You can read up on it here: http://www.w3.org/TR/IndexedDB/#dfn-multientry. However, you can live perfectly fine with setting this to false (or just omitting it, this is set to false by default).

If you want to add an index to an existing store, you need to increase the version number of your store, as adding an index changes the structure of the database.

To modify an index, modify the object in the indexes Array in the constructor. Again, you need to increase the version of your store.

In addition, there are still some convenience methods available:


  1. The hasIndex method.
hasIndexfunction(/*String*/ indexName)

Return true if an index with the given name exists in the store, false if not.


  1. The getIndexList method.
getIndexListfunction()

Returns a DOMStringList with all existing indices.

To run queries, IDBWrapper provides an iterate() method. To create keyRanges, there is the makeKeyRange() method. In addition to these, IDBWrapper comes with a count() method.


  1. The iterate method.
iteratefunction(/*Function*/ onItem/*Object*/ iterateOptions)

The onItem callback will be called once for every match. It will receive three arguments: the object that matched the query, a reference to the current cursor object (IDBWrapper uses IndexedDB's Cursor internally to iterate), and a reference to the current ongoing transaction.

There's one special situation: if you didn't pass an onEnd handler in the options objects (see below), the onItem handler will be called one extra time when the transaction is over. In this case, it will receive null as only argument. So, to check when the iteration is over and you won't get any more data objects, you can either pass an onEnd handler, or check for null in the onItem handler.

The iterateOptions object can contain one or more of the following properties:

The index property contains the name of the index to operate on. If you omit this, IDBWrapper will use the store's keyPath as index.

In the keyRange property you can pass a keyRange.

The order property can be set to 'ASC' or 'DESC', and determines the ordering direction of results. If you omit this, IDBWrapper will use 'ASC'.

The filterDuplicates property is an interesting one: If you set this to true (it defaults to false), and have several objects that have the same value in their key, the store will only fetch the first of those. It is not about objects being the same, it's about their key being the same. For example, in the customers database are a couple of guys having 'Smith' as last name. Setting filterDuplicates to true in the above example will make iterate() call the onItem callback only for the first of those.

The writeAccess property defaults to false. If you need write access to the store during the iteration, you need to set this to true.

In the onEnd property you can pass a callback that gets called after the iteration is over and the transaction is closed. It does not receive any arguments.

In the onError property you can pass a custom error handler. In case of an error, it will be called and receives the Error object as only argument.


  1. The makeKeyRange method.
iteratefunction(/*Object*/ keyRangeOptions)

Returns an IDBKeyRange.

The keyRangeOptions object must have one or more of the following properties:

lower: The lower bound of the range

excludeLower: Boolean, whether to exclude the lower bound itself. Default: false

upper: The upper bound of the range

excludeUpper: Boolean, whether to exclude the upper bound itself. Default: false


  1. The count method.
iteratefunction(/*Function*/ onSuccess/*Object*/ countOptions)

The onSuccess receives the result of the count as only argument.

The countOptions object may have one or more of the following properties:

index: The name of an index to operate on.

keyRange: A keyRange to use