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    hops-webpack

    15.2.1 • Public • Published

    hops-webpack

    hops-webpack is the largest and most complex of hops's core packages. It contains half of its total lines of code and provides both a preset and a core mixin. It provides a comprehensive, but rather minimal Webpack setup as a basis for your own configurations.

    Based on hops-express, it also features development and production servers. The former even comes with hot module replacement (HMR).

    During application startup, hops-webpack runs a check to determine if Webpack is installed multiple times. If you see warnings telling you that this is the case, you will want to make sure you get rid of these duplicates, as they will almost certainly break things in interesting ways.

    Installation

    $ yarn add hops-webpack # OR npm install hops-webpack

    CLI

    build

    This is the most basic of hops-webpack's commands - and it simply performs a Webpack build according to its arguments and configuration. It will not only start a usual browser build, but also one for the server-side version of your application.

    To run the built application afterwards, use hops-express's serve-command;

    $ hops build -p && hops serve -p

    Arguments

    -p / --production

    If hops build is called with the production argument, hops itself sets the shell environment variable $NODE_ENV to "production". This variable is generally used in lots of places, for example to fine-tune hops-webpack's Webpack configurations.

    $ hops build -p # OR hops build --production

    This is equivalent to manually setting $NODE_ENV before calling the actual command. Use whatever works best in your specific setting.

    $ NODE_ENV=production hops build
    --fast-build experimental

    Using the experimental --fast-build option will only transpile a predefined set of node modules. If you use a node module that ships ES language features that aren't supported by your browser matrix it might break your website. Therefore only use this feature if you have a comprehensive test setup which covers all your supported browsers.

    You can extend this predefined set though by adding glob patterns to the experimental.babelIncludePatterns config.

    develop

    Using this command, you can start a full-featured development server that is as similar to a production system as possible. It does, however, ensure the browser and server versions of your application are being recompiled and redeployed whenever you change your code.

    $ hops develop

    start

    This is probably the hops command your will use most of the time - we certainly do. It is, essentially, just a shorthand for other hops commands.

    $ hops start # OR hops start -p

    Arguments

    -p / --production

    If called in production mode, hops start will first perform a build and start an express server afterwards. Otherwise it will start a development server. hops start -p is thus equivalent to hops build -p && hops serve -p, while hops start is equivalent to hops develop. All arguments are used as documented with those other commands.

    Of course, once again, you can also manually set $NODE_ENV.

    $ NODE_ENV=production hops start
    --parallel-build / --no-parallel-build

    A Hops build will fork its process in order to let the Webpack builds run in parallel child processes. While it usually does not reduce the build time it actually helps to significantly reduce the peak memory consumption of the build.

    This feature is enabled by default and can be disabled via the --no-parallel-build (or --parallel-build=false) argument.

    --fast-dev experimental

    Using the experimental --fast-dev option will disable automatic polyfilling and transpiling of all node_modules files through babel to enable faster development times. This will lead to a different bundle being created than in production mode and will not work in all browsers (modern browsers only). Use with caution and report any bugs you may encounter.

    DO NOT USE THIS MODE FOR QA OR PRODUCTION

    --experimental-esbuild experimental

    Using the experimental --experimental-esbuild option will replace the babel-loader of Hops's internal Webpack config with the esbuild-loader. While esbuild is significantly faster than Babel, it's still early-stage and might lead to unexpected results.

    To use it, install esbuild-loader and esbuild-jest as dev-dependencies in your project.

    In order to use esbuild in Jest you need to set the USE_EXPERIMENTAL_ESBUILD environment variable to true.

    USE_EXPERIMENTAL_ESBUILD=true npm test

    Please be aware that things are working differently in esbuild than Babel. The currently known drawbacks and limitations are:

    • esbuild is not on a stable release cycle yet. Please also read about the production readyness from the main author.
    • esbuild does not typecheck your TypeScript files, it can only convert them to JavaScript.
    • to use the JSX syntax in TypeScript you have to use the .tsx extention. We recommend to also use the .jsx extention for JavaScript based JSX files to be consistent, even though it's not required.
    • it does not support the new JSX Transform, so it's up to you to import React into every component
    • Hops' importComponent is currently a Babel plugin and for esbuild we only implemented the transpilation of the simple syntax for now (arrow function with import expression). That means it only supports default imports, but no named imports.
    // example of supported syntax:
    const Home = importComponent(() => import('./home'));
    // example of unsupported syntax:
    const Home = importComponent(
      () => import('./home'),
      (namespace) => namespace.Home
    );

    And there might be more issues. So please report any bugs you may encounter to us.

    API

    hops-webpack provides a couple of configurable exports for your convenience: mixin hooks marked with 'callable' below can be called like in the following example example:

    const { build } = require('hops-webpack');
    build();

    If you need to provide config overrides or options to these kinds of calls, you can do so like in the next example.

    const { configure } = require('hops-webpack');
    const { build } = configure(configOverrides, options);
    build();

    The above example is functionally equivalent to directly working with hops-bootstrap's bootstrap export.

    configureBuild(webpackConfig, loaderConfigs, target) (sequence)

    If you implement this mixin hook in your hops-bootstrap core mixin, you will be able to modify the different Webpack configs hops uses in any way you like.

    In addition to the actual webpackConfig, which, by the way, your implementation is expected to return, you will receive an object containing all loaderConfigs and a target argument. This last argument can be build, develop, or node.

    const { Mixin } = require('hops-mixin');
    
    module.exports = class MyMixin extends Mixin {
      configureBuild(webpackConfig, loaderConfigs, target) {
        webpackConfig.resolve.extensions.push('.ftw');
      }
    };

    You can use whatever mechanism you like to modify the complicated structures Webpack configs unfortunately have to be. For convenience, loaderConfigs contains the following properties for you to inspect and modify specific loader configs directly:

    Property Explanation
    jsLoaderConfig babel-loader config
    urlLoaderConfig url-loader config
    fileLoaderConfig file-loader config
    allLoaderConfigs Array of loader configs passed to oneOf module loader rule

    Caveat: please be advised that, while we strive to provide very stable webpackConfig and loaderConfigs arguments, these may change in subtle ways between minor versions of hops-webpack. For example, specific loader options may stop working. Additionally, other mixins may alter these arguments in relevant ways, so code accordingly.

    inspectBuild(stats, config) (sequence)

    If you want to programmatically determine whether a build went well, your mixin can implement this method. It will be called with a Webpack stats object and the actual configuration used for the specific build you are inspecting.

    build() (callable)

    If you want to intialize a build of your application, you can do so using this utility mixin method. It returns a Promise resolving to a stats object.

    This method is also exported so that you can use it in your own, non-mixin code. Import it like so: import { build } from 'hops-webpack';. In this mode, it also accepts another argument, options, which you can pass any CLI argument to.

    clean() (callable)

    Using this utility mixin method, you can delete your buildDir and all of its contents. It returns a Promise.

    This method is also exported so that you can use it in your own, non-mixin code. Import it like so: import { clean } from 'hops-webpack';. In this mode, it also accepts another argument, options, which you can pass any CLI argument to.

    getWebpackBuildConfig(target) (callable)

    Returns the webpack config for the production build after configureBuild has been applied. target argument can be browser or none and will determine which mixins should be bundled.

    This method is also exported so that you can use it in your own, non-mixin code. Import it like so: import { getWebpackBuildConfig } from 'hops-webpack';. In this mode, it also accepts another argument, options, which you can pass any CLI argument to.

    getWebpackDevelopConfig(target) (callable)

    Returns the webpack config for the development build after configureBuild has been applied. target argument can be browser or none and will determine which mixins should be bundled.

    This method is also exported so that you can use it in your own, non-mixin code. Import it like so: import { getWebpackDevelopConfig } from 'hops-webpack';. In this mode, it also accepts another argument, options, which you can pass any CLI argument to.

    getWebpackNodeConfig(target) (callable)

    Returns the webpack config for the server-side Node.js build after configureBuild has been applied. target argument can be server or none and will determine which mixins should be bundled.

    This method is also exported so that you can use it in your own, non-mixin code. Import it like so: import { getWebpackNodeConfig } from 'hops-webpack';. In this mode, it also accepts another argument, options, which you can pass any CLI argument to.

    Settings

    Property Type Default
    browsers [string] ['defaults']
    node string 'current'
    basePath string ''
    assetPath string '<basePath>'
    buildDir string '<distDir>'
    serverDir string '<rootDir>/node_modules/.cache/hops-webpack'
    serverFile string 'server.js'
    statsFile string 'stats.json'

    browsers

    This is a browserslist configuration that is being used and Babel's preset-env to determine what language features need to be transpiled and/or polyfilled for your target platforms.

    {
      "browsers": ["last 1 Chrome versions"]
    }

    node

    This is the target Node.js version Babel's preset-env transpiles features for. Usually you will want to keep its default, as it is best practice to develop and build your application on the same Node version as you run in production.

    {
      "node": "14.5"
    }

    basePath

    This is the URL base path, i.e. subfolder, your application will be served from.

    {
      "basePath": "<name>"
    }

    assetPath

    This is the URL base path, i.e. subfolder, your application's assets will be served from. If set, this folder will be created in your buildDir at build time.

    {
      "assetPath": "<basePath>/assets"
    }

    buildDir

    Path of your browser build output. By default, this folder is usually removed before building. Make sure the contents of this folder can be served by your webserver.

    {
      "buildDir": "<rootDir>/build"
    }

    serverDir

    Path of your server build output. It will only be used in production-mode. By default, this folder is located inside your node_modules folder and it is usually removed before building.

    {
      "serverDir": "<buildDir>"
    }

    serverFile

    Path of your server output file, relative to serverDir. It will only be generated in production-mode and is being used internally.

    {
      "serverFile": "server.js"
    }

    statsFile

    Path of your stats file, relative to serverDir. It will only be generated in production-mode and is being used internally.

    {
      "assetFile": "stats.json"
    }

    Debugging

    Available tags for the debug-module are:

    • hops:webpack:config:build
    • hops:webpack:config:develop
    • hops:webpack:config:node
    • hops:webpack:dependencies

    Keywords

    none

    Install

    npm i hops-webpack

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    155

    Version

    15.2.1

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    79.6 kB

    Total Files

    29

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • robertkowalski
    • zaubernerd
    • jhiode
    • knisterpeter
    • hops-release
    • dmbch
    • aithir
    • robin-drexler