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    hilary

    5.2.0 • Public • Published

    hilary.js

    Hilary is an easy to use JavaScript Inversion of Control (IoC) container written for Node.js and the browser. Hilary's aim is to deliver low-ceremony dependency injection (DI), to aid in decoupling JavaScript modules and testing. It's named after Hilary Page, who designed building blocks that later became known as Legos.

    Also check out generator-hilary, our Yeoman generator, and Gidget our route/app engine.

    You can find documentation and examples on the documentation. Below is just a quick-start. There are also lots of examples

    If the bootstrapper in the examples that follow looks foreign to you, consider reading about the composition root pattern.

    Getting Started with Node.js

    Install Hilary:

    npm install --save hilary
    

    In this example, we'll produce the following files:

    • api.js: our web server
    • http.js: a platform specific HTTP implementation
    • app.js: our composition root / bootstrapper

    Let's start with the web server, api.js, which will simply return "Hello World" when we navigate to localhost:3000.

    Modules need to export a name and a factory at a minimum. Checkout Registering Modules for more detailed instructions.

    Note that we're not referencing Hilary, yet. There is no need to couple Hilary to your modules. Hilary just expects your modules to export specific properties, such as name, dependencies, and factory.

    // api.js
    module.exports.name = 'api';
    module.exports.factory = function (http) {
        'use strict';
     
        http.createServer(function (req, res) {
            res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
            res.end('Hello World\n');
        }).listen(3000, '127.0.0.1');
     
        console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:3000/');
     
        return http;
    };

    The module above depends on the http module. This is built in to Node.js, and we could start our app now, but let's add our own http module that uses httpsys if we're on a Windows platform.

    // http.js
    module.exports.name = 'http';
    module.exports.factory = function () {
        'use strict';
     
        if (/^win/.test(process.platform)) {
            // the platform is a flavor of Windows
            // take advantage of the httpsys performance enhancements
            return require('httpsys').http();
        } else {
            // otherwise, stick with the standard http module
            return require('http');
        }
    };

    Finally, we'll start the app. In app.js (filename is your preference), we'll require Hilary, create a scope, and compose our application, using Hilary's bootstrapper.

    // app.js
    var scope = require('hilary').scope('myApp');
     
    scope.bootstrap([
        scope.makeRegistrationTask(require('./http.js')),
        scope.makeRegistrationTask(require('./api.js'))
    ], function (err, scope) {
        if (err) {
            console.log(err);
            return;
        }
     
        console.log('starting api');
        // In this example, resolving `api` starts our app
        scope.resolve('api');
    });

    We can now run our example: node app, and navigate to localhost:3000 to see it working.

    Getting Started with the Browser

    Let's say we're building a simple Hello World bot, that asks for your name, and says hello to you. We also want to be able to choose between two notifiers: alerts, and console logs.

    In this example, we'll produce the following files:

    • alertNotifier.js: notifies the user with JavaScript alerts
    • consoleNotifier.js: notifies the user with console logs
    • bot.js: says hello
    • viewModel.js: binds to the DOM
    • app.js: our composition root / bootstrapper
    • index.html: the markup

    We'll start with the alert notifier:

    Modules need to export a name and a factory at a minimum. Checkout Checkout Registering Modules for more detailed instructions. When using a shim, like module.exports, the scope is also required.

    // alertNotifier.js
    module.exports = {
        scope: 'myApp',
        name: 'alertNotifier',
        factory: function () {
            'use strict';
     
            return {
                notify: function (message) {
                    alert(message);
                }
            };
        }
    };

    Then, we'll add a console notifier:

    // consoleNotifier.js
    module.exports = {
        scope: 'myApp',
        name: 'consoleNotifier',
        factory: function () {
            'use strict';
     
            return {
                notify: function (message) {
                    console.log(message);
                }
            };
        }
    };

    Next, we'll add a bot module that depends on notifier, to say hello:

    Note that the interface of notifier matches both the alertNotifier, and the consoleNotifier, but neither have the name, "notifier". We'll register the module we want to use later.

    // bot.js
    module.exports = {
        scope: 'myApp',
        name: 'bot',
        dependencies: ['notifier'],
        factory: function (notifier) {
            'use strict';
     
            return {
                sayHello: function (name) {
                    notifier.notify('Hello, ' + name);
                }
            };
        }
    };

    Since this is a web app, we need to bind to the DOM. Let's create a view model that binds to a text input, and a button:

    // viewModel.js
    module.exports = {
        scope: 'myApp',
        name: 'viewModel',
        dependencies: ['bot'],
        factory: function (bot) {
            'use strict';
     
            document.getElementById('submit').addEventListener('click', function() {
                bot.sayHello(document.getElementById('name').value);
            }, false);
        }
    };

    Finally, we'll compose/bootstrap these modules. We need to register the chosen notifier, and resolve viewModel to bind to the DOM, starting the app:

    // app.js
    hilary.scope('myApp').bootstrap([
        function (scope, next) {
            scope.register({
                name: 'notifier',
                factory: scope.resolve('alertNotifier')
            });
     
            next(null, scope);
        }
    ], function (err, scope) {
        if (err) {
            throw err;
        }
     
        scope.resolve('viewModel');
        console.log('ready');
    });

    And here's the markup:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="UTF-8">
        <title>hilary | Hello World</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <label>What is your name?</label>
        <input id="name" type="text" />
        <input id="submit" type="submit" value="submit" />
     
        <script src="bower_components/polyn/release/polyn.min.js"></script> 
        <script src="bower_components/hilary/release/hilary.min.js"></script> 
        <script src="bower_components/hilary/release/hilary-browser-module-shim.js"></script> 
        <script src="alertNotifier.js"></script> 
        <script src="consoleNotifier.js"></script> 
        <script src="bot.js"></script> 
        <script src="viewModel.js"></script> 
        <script src="app.js"></script> 
     
    </body>
    </html>

    What if I already have another module.exports shim?

    These examples use a module.exports shim, which isn't required. If you are using another module.exports implementation, you can replace this:

    module.exports = {
        scope: 'myApp',
        name: 'myModule',
        factory: function () {}
    }

    with this:

    Hilary.scope('myApp').register({
        scope: 'myApp',
        name: 'myModule',
        factory: function () {}
    });

    You also could write your own shim, if you don't want to couple your modules to hilary (recommended):

    window.customRegister = function (val) {
        if (!val) {
            return;
        }
     
        if (val.scope) {
            hilary.scope(val.scope).register(val);
        } else {
            console.log(new Error('WARNING: you should always declare a scope when registering hilary modules in a browser (module: ' + val.name + ')'));
            hilary.register(val);
        }
    }

    Install

    npm i hilary

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    8

    Version

    5.2.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    365 kB

    Total Files

    40

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • losandes