node package manager

grunt-hash-files

grunt-hash-files

Copies files to a directory that includes a hash of the contents of those files.

Getting Started

This plugin requires Grunt ~0.4.2

If you haven't used Grunt before, be sure to check out the Getting Started guide, as it explains how to create a Gruntfile as well as install and use Grunt plugins. Once you're familiar with that process, you may install this plugin with this command:

npm install grunt-hash-files --save-dev

Once the plugin has been installed, it may be enabled inside your Gruntfile with this line of JavaScript:

grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-hash-files');

The "hash_files" task

Overview

In your project's Gruntfile, add a section named hash_files to the data object passed into grunt.initConfig().

grunt.initConfig({
    hash_files: {
        options: {
            // Task-specific options go here. 
        },
        your_target: {
            // Target-specific file lists and/or options go here. 
        },
    },
});

Options

algorithm

Type: String Default value: "sha1"

A string value that is the type of hashing algorithm to use. Must be either "sha1" or "md5".

numChars

Type: Number Default value: undefined

The number of characters from the beginning of the hash value to use. When set to undefined, all characters are used.

token

Type: String Default value: "{hash}"

The string used as a token for where the actual hash value should be replaced.

encoding

Type: String
Default: grunt.file.defaultEncoding

The file encoding to copy files with.

mode

Type: Boolean or Number
Default: false

Whether to copy or set the existing file permissions. Set to true to copy the existing file permissions. Or set to the mode, i.e.: 0644, that copied files will be set to.

Usage Examples

Default Options

In this example, the default options are used to do something with whatever. So if the testing file has the content Testing and the 123 file had the content 1 2 3, the generated result would be Testing, 1 2 3.

grunt.initConfig({
    hash_files: {
        options: {},
        files: {
            'dest/{hash}/': ['src/testing', 'src/123'],
        },
    },
});

Custom Options

In this example, custom options are used to do something else with whatever else. So if the testing file has the content Testing and the 123 file had the content 1 2 3, the generated result in this case would be Testing: 1 2 3 !!!

grunt.initConfig({
    hash_files: {
        options: {
            algorithm: 'md5',
            numChars: 7,
            token: '\<hash\>'
        },
        files: {
            'dest/<token>/': ['src/testing', 'src/123'],
        },
    },
});

Here are some additional examples, given the following file tree:

$ tree -I node_modules
.
├── Gruntfile.js
└── src
    ├── a
    └── subdir
        └── b
 
2 directories, 3 files

Copy a single file tree:

hash_files: {
    main: {
        src: 'src/*',
        dest: '{hash}/'
    }
},
$ grunt hash-files
Running "hash_files:main" (hash_files) task
Created 1 directories, copied 1 files
 
Done, without errors.
$ tree -I node_modules
.
├── Gruntfile.js
├── bdb72f90802abc542e79d0e6eb809d7ed71b0f00
│   └── src
│       ├── a
│       └── subdir
└── src
    ├── a
    └── subdir
        └── b
 
5 directories, 4 files

Flattening the filepath output:

hash_files: {
    options: {
        numChars: 8,
        algorithm: 'md5'
    },
    main: {
        expand: true,
        cwd: 'src/',
        src: '**',
        dest: '{hash}/',
        flatten: true,
        filter: 'isFile'
    }
},
$ grunt hash_files
Running "hash_files:main" (hash_files) task
Copied 2 files
 
Done, without errors.
$ tree -I node_modules
.
├── Gruntfile.js
├── 6a003f0e
│   ├── a
│   └── b
└── src
    ├── a
    └── subdir
        └── b
 
3 directories, 5 files