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grunt-coffee-jshint

grunt-coffee-jshint

npm version David dependency drift detection

Grunt wrapper for coffee-jshint

NOTE: As of version 2.0.0, grunt-coffee-jshint depends (through coffee-jshint) on coffeescript in favor of the, now deprecated, coffee-script name.

Getting Started

This plugin requires Grunt >=0.4.1

If you haven't used Grunt before, be sure to check out the Getting Started guide, as it explains how to create a Gruntfile as well as install and use Grunt plugins. Once you're familiar with that process, you may install this plugin with this command:

npm install grunt-coffee-jshint --save-dev

Once the plugin has been installed, it may be enabled inside your Gruntfile with this line of JavaScript:

grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-coffee-jshint');

The "coffee_jshint" task

Overview

In your project's Gruntfile, add a section named coffee_jshint to the data object passed into grunt.initConfig().

grunt.initConfig({
  coffee_jshint: {
    options: {
      // Task-specific options go here.
    },
    your_target: {
      // Target-specific file lists and/or options go here.
    },
  },
});

Options

options.jshintOptions

Type: Array Default value: []

A list of JSHint options to pass on as the coffee-jshint --options option1,option2,option3,etc,... argument.

For more information about these, please see JSHint's options.

options.withDefaults

Type: Boolean Default value: true

If you want to turn off the default options for coffee-jshint, change this flag to false.

This is the equivalent of doing coffee-jshint --default-options-off.

For a list of coffee-jshint's defaults, please see its options.

options.globals

Type: Array Default value: []

A list of all globals in the project.

This option is passed on as the coffee-jshint --globals global1,global2,etc,... argument.

See also coffee-jshint's globals.

Usage Examples

Custom Options

In this example, some globals and jshintOptions are defined at the task level options, sometimes to be specifically replaced with target level definitions. For more information on what they do, please see JSHint's Enforcing options, Relaxing options and Environments. The latter group let JSHint know about some pre-defined global variables so that you don't have to explicitly include them into globals.

grunt.initConfig({
  coffee_jshint: {
 
    options: {
 
      globals: [
 
        'define',
        'IntersectionObserver',
        'Symbol'
      ],
 
      jshintOptions: [
 
        //  Environments:
        //
        'browserify'
        'browser'
        'devel'
 
        //  Enforcing options:
        //
        'eqeqeq',
        'forin',
        'noarg',
        'nonew',
        'undef',
        'unused',
 
        //  Relaxing options:
        //
        'debug',
        'loopfunc'
      ]
    },
 
    app: {
      files: [ ... ]
    },
 
    gruntfile: {
 
      options: {
 
        globals: [],
 
        jshintOptions: [
 
          //  Environments:
          //
          'node'
        ]
      },
 
      files: [ ... ]
    },
 
    test: {
 
      options: {
 
        jshintOptions: [
 
          //  Environments:
          //
          'jasmine',
          'node'
 
          //  Enforcing options:
          //
          //... likely copied from task level `options.jshintOptions`
 
          //  Relaxing options:
          //
          //... likely copied from task level `options.jshintOptions`
        ]
      }
 
      files: [ ... ]
    }
  }
});

Contributing

In lieu of a formal styleguide, take care to maintain the existing coding style. Add unit tests for any new or changed functionality. Lint and test your code using Grunt.

Prerequisites

Setup

Clone this repository somewhere, switch to it, then:

$ git config commit.template ./.gitmessage
$ npm install

This will:

Commit

Commit Message Format Discipline

This project uses conventional-changelog/standard-version for automatic versioning and CHANGELOG management.

To make this work, please ensure that your commit messages adhere to the Commit Message Format. Setting your git config to have the commit.template as referenced below will help you with a detailed reminder of how to do this on every git commit.

$ git config commit.template ./.gitmessage

Release

  • Determine what your next semver <version> should be:

    $ version="<version>"
  • Bump the package's .version, update the CHANGELOG, commit these, and tag the commit as v<version>:

    $ npm run release
  • If all is well this new version should be identical to your intended <version>:

    $ jq ".version == \"${version}\"" package.json

    If this is not the case, then either your assumptions about what changed are wrong, or (at least) one of your commits did not adhere to the Commit Message Format Discipline; Abort the release, and sort it out first.

Publish

To NPM

$ npm publish

On GitHub

git push --follow-tags --all
  • Go to https://github.com/bmac/grunt-coffee-jshint/releases;

  • Click the Draft a new release button;

  • Select the appropriate v<version> tag from the dropdown menu;

  • You could enter a title and some release notes here; at the very least include a link to the corresponding section in the CHANGELOG as:

    [Change log](CHANGELOG.md# ... )
  • Click the Publish release button;

ChangeLog

See CHANGELOG.

License

MIT