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    gql-logger

    4.0.0 • Public • Published

    gql-logger

    gql-logger is a simple class-based logger designed to integrate with the graphql context argument. It provides traceability, basic logging, and console-based performance snapshots for production and development environments.

    gql-logger is built using typescript and ships with type support. It is configured to allow for easy implementation both with commonJS and ES6.

    Installation

    Using yarn:

    $ yarn add gql-logger 
    

    Using npm:

    $ npm install gql-logger 
    

    Getting Started

    gql-logger was designed for easy set-up with apollo-server-express.

    import Logger from 'gql-logger'
    
    const logger = new Logger({
    		// level defaults to 4 or `process.env.LOG_LEVEL` value
    		appName: 'example-app',
    	})
    
    const server = new ApolloServer({
    	resolvers: ... //,
    	plugins: ... //,
    	context: async ({ req }) => {
    		const { headers, sessionID } = req;
    
    		logger.refreshInstance({
    			correlation: headers['x-correlation-id'],
    			session: sessionID,
    		})
    
    		return {
    			logger
    		};
    	},
    	...//
    });

    Introducing v4+ and the New Queue-Logger (Possible Breaking Change):

    Overview

    Depending on how you have your logger configured, version 4+ may result in breaking changes. Essentially, a third logging mode has been added to the logger, and mode selection has now been streamlined into a single argument aptly-named mode. The default mode is the new 'queue' mode.

    What does 'queue' mode do?

    The 'queue' mode acts very similarly to 'list' mode, except that it will ensure that all functions executed during a given trace-session are aggregated together within a given tolerance (for now, this is set to 10 seconds with plans to make it configurable in the future).

    Let's illustrate what this means:

    The "problem" with 'list' mode (although this may be preferrable depending on your use-case) is that it produces an output any time its internal stack length is 0. For example:

    //some resolver class:
    
    // if you are unfamiliar with decorators or don't know how this package works, check-out "Usage" to see the long-hand implementation of the logger.
    
    @Log()
    async func1 () {
    	await someFunc2()
    }
    
    // some other class:
    @Log()
    async someFunc2() {
    	// implementation
    }

    will output:

    <some-trace-id> => [
    	'func1 - <some-timestamp>',
    	'someFunc2 - <some-timestamp>',
    	...
    ] - 7ms

    However let's say I also want this resolver to be billable, so I create a @Bill decorator:

    @Bill()
    @Log()
    async func1 () {
    	await someFunc2()
    }
    
    // some other class:
    @Log()
    async someFunc2() {
    	// implementation
    }

    may output something like this:

    <some-trace-id> => ['billDecorator - <some-timestamp>'] - 1ms
    
    <some-trace-id> => [
    	'func1 - <some-timestamp>',
    	'someFunc2 - <some-timestamp>',
    	...
    ] - 7ms

    While this is not always a problem (it definitely gives some insight as to how GraphQL and associated tooling functions under-the-hood), it can lead to console-clutter and confusion.

    'queue' mode will attempt to aggregate logs by a given trace. If a new trace is generated, it will ouput the complete set of functions in the order they are called regardless of whether they are embedded within one-another. This is why it is called 'queue' mode, although it is essentially a queue of 1 where one trace always knocks-out the trace ahead of it.

    The question then arises as to what happens when a new trace is not immediately generated. A loop monitors the internal stack, and if no new functions have been added to the list for the same trace within a 10s tolerance, it empties the queue into the console.

    The above example would then look like this:

    <some-trace-id> => [
    	'billDecorator - <some-timestamp>'
    	'func1 - <some-timestamp>',
    	'someFunc2 - <some-timestamp>',
    	...
    ] - 8ms

    Although this example is arbitrary and simple, the value of this functionality is quickly seen when dealing with complex resovlers that depend on multiple decorators, helper functions, and field resolvers.

    Class: Logger

    Arguments

    Name Default Description
    level: number? 4 This allows for control over which types of logs will be produced between different environments. Options are: 0: OFF, 1: ERROR, 2: INFO, 3: WARN, 4: DEBUG. gql-logger will first attempt to set the log level by checking for process.env.LOG_LEVEL. If the application does not use dotenv, it reverts to the default value. The lower the value, the more conservative the logging. For example, setting level as 3 will cause the logger to ignore all logger.debug() calls. Setting a number less than 0 or greater than 4 will produce the same behaviour as though the level was set to 0 and 4 respectively.
    appName: string? undefined You can set the name of the application calling the logger. If not specified, the app field will not appear in the log output. This field is especially useful when utilizing a log aggregator across various applications.
    correlation: string? undefined This field is used to compose the trace output value. It requires that the x-correlation-id header be set for client requests. If undefined, it will substitute UNSET where the x-correlation-id would usually appear.
    session: string? undefined This argument can be used to store session IDs if using session-based authentication. If not set, the session field will not appear in the log output.
    userId: string? undefined This argument can be used to store a user ID. If not set, the userId field will not appear in the log output.
    identifier: string? undefined This can be used to store any other identifier appropriate to your application. If not set, the identifier field will not appear in the log output.
    mode?: 'queue', | 'list' | 'cascade' 'queue' Determines the output / logging style. The default and recommended mode is 'queue'.
    decoratorCount?: number 10 Because the Log decorator is event-driven, it can result in more than 10 listeners to a single event, triggering a NodeJS warning. Pass your decorator count so that NodeJS knows that the listeners in excess of 10 are intentional and not due to a memory leak.

    API

    The following methods are available:

    start()

    The main method used when initiating logging for a given function. Internally start() calls info and starts a timer. Arguments

    • self: string
    • status: number?

    Output (mode: 'cascade' => other modes do not output for start())

    {
      origin: 'someResolver',
      message: 'someResolver called',
      trace: 'UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi',
      status: 200,
      ts: 1633824049556,
      type: 'info',
      session: 'some-session-id',
      app: 'anApp'
    }

    end()

    The main method used to end the log for a given function. Internally end() calls info and ends a timer.

    Arguments

    • self: string
    • status: number?

    Output (mode: 'cascade')

    {
      origin: 'someResolver',
      message: 'someResolver invoked successfully',
      trace: 'UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi',
      status: 200,
      ts: 1633824049575,
      type: 'info',
      session: 'some-session-id',
      app: 'anApp'
    }
    getCreditsIssuedGraph - UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi: 18.665ms

    error()

    The main method used to handle and log errors. The intention is that this method is used in conjunction with Logger.prototype.start() in order to benchmark time-to-error. If the method is being used independently of the start method, you can pass the the value false for the optional 4th argument timeEnd.

    Arguments

    • self: string
    • error: Error
    • status: number?
    • timeEnd: boolean (default = true)

    Output (mode: 'cascade')

    {
    	origin: 'someResolver',
    	message: 'some error message',
    	trace 'UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi',
    	status: 500,
    	ts: 1633824049575,
    	type: 'error',
    	session: 'some-session-id',
    	app: 'anApp'
    }
    getCreditsIssuedGraph - UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi: 18.665ms

    debug()

    Arguments

    • origin: string
    • message: string
    • status: number?

    Output

    {
    	origin: 'someResolver',
    	message: 'some custom message',
    	trace 'UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi',
    	status: 200,
    	ts: 1633824049575,
    	type: 'debug',
    	session: 'some-session-id',
    	app: 'anApp'
    }

    info()

    Arguments

    • origin: string
    • message: string
    • status: number?

    Output

    {
    	origin: 'someResolver',
    	message: 'some custom message',
    	trace 'UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi',
    	status: 200,
    	ts: 1633824049575,
    	type: 'info',
    	session: 'some-session-id',
    	app: 'anApp'
    }

    warn()

    Arguments

    • origin: string
    • message: string
    • status: number?

    Output

    {
    	origin: 'someResolver',
    	message: 'some custom message',
    	trace 'UNSET-sktwieu0kukgnkwi',
    	status: 400,
    	ts: 1633824049575,
    	type: 'warn',
    	session: 'some-session-id',
    	app: 'anApp'
    }

    refreshInstance()

    Arguments

    • correlation?: string
    • session?: string
    • userId?: string
    • identifier?: string

    Description This function can be called within context creation to allow for logging through the course of a new request without having to re-instantiate the logger. This allows for the instance to be defined once, separately from context creation, while still maintaining request-specific state.


    Decorator: Log

    The Log decorator provides out-of-the-box logging without having to reimplement boiler-plate logging functionality for every eligible function. It is more geared towards business-logic rather than GraphQL resolvers themselves. This is because tools like TypeGraphQL ship with their own special methods that are required to make comatible decorators, and providing compatibility with such tools is beyond the scope of this package.

    Usage Example

    import { Log } from 'gql-logger';
    
    class AuthHelper {
    	@Log()
    	async helpGenerateOTP() {
    		const password = // some logic ;
    
    		return `${password}`;
    	}
    }

    This simple function would yield the following output in List Mode:

    <SOME_TRACE> => [ 'helpGenerateOTP - 1641875087166' ]  - 22ms

    This clearly saves a lot of code when compared to the example shown in the Usage section.

    List Mode

    If you set mode to 'list', you do not have to change any other code. Be aware the in place of the outputs for start() and end(), the logger will output a single log to the console with the following format:

    <some-trace-id> => [
    	'<some-function> - <some-timestamp>',
    	'<some-function> - <some-timestamp>',
    	'Error: <some-function> - <some-timestamp> - <error-message>', 
    	...
    ] - 7ms

    The major disadvantage of list mode is that other logs to the console will not be sandwiched between the start and end logs corresponding to thier caller (i.e. you see the order in which functions are called, but not necessarily the scope where they are called).

    Usage

    Here is an example of where / how these methods are intended to be called from within a GraphQL resolver:

    const someResolver = async (root, { input }, context) => {
    	const { logger } = context;
    	const self = someResolver.name;
    	logger.start(self)
    	
    	let res
    	
    	try {
    		res = // logic
    	} catch (e) {
    		logger.error(self, e)
    		throw e
    	}
    	
    	logger.end(self)
    	return res
    }

    And that's it!

    Contribute

    This project is pretty small and the code should be easy to follow, but I am open to expanding functionality -- there is not enough here yet to warrant implementing a contribution standard, so I will review any PRs that come my way!

    Support

    Install

    npm i gql-logger

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    Version

    4.0.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    53.5 kB

    Total Files

    48

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    Collaborators

    • ibrahidm