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funstream

funstream

Funstream gives you iteratorish methods on your streams.

const fun = require('funstream')
 
fun([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
  .map(n => n + 1)
  .filter(n => n % 2)
  .map(n => `${n}\n`)
  .pipe(process.stdout)
// prints lines with 3 and 5
fun([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
  .map(n => n + 1)
  .filter(n => n % 2)
  .reduce((a, b) => a + b)
  .then(console.log)
// prints 8
 
// `fun()` takes all sorts of arguments…
// readable streams…
fun(process.stdin)
// Promised streams…
fun(fetch('https://example.com').then(r => r.body))
// generators…
function * mygen () {
  for (let ii = 0; ii < 10000; ++ii) {
    yield ii
  }
}
fun(mygen())
// arrays
fun([1, 2, 3, 4])
// writable streams are promises
fun(writestream)
  .then(() => console.log('finished!'))
  .catch(err => console.error('stream error', err)
// writable streams are streams AND promises
process.stdin.pipe(fun(writestream))
  .then(() => console.log('done!'))
 
// If you're not so keen on mutating things, why not try piping into a piping hot fun stream?
process.stdin.pipe(fun())
  .map(str => transformStr(str))
  .pipe(process.stdout)
 
// Fun functions can be sync…
.map(str => str.slice(10))
 
// Fun functions can be async…
.map(async str => (await transformStr(str)).slice(10))
 
// Fun functions can be promise returning…
.map(str => transformStr(str))
 
// Fun functions can be callback using…
.async().map((str, cb) => transformStrCB(str, cb))
 
// And you can bundle up some transforms into a transform stream:
const mytransformStream =
  fun(stream => stream.map(str => str.toUpperCase).
                       flatMap(= [v, v]))
 

Funstream makes object streams better.

Funstream constructors

fun(readableStream[, opts]) → FunStream

This is probably what you want.

Makes an existing stream a funstream! Has the advantage over fun() of handling error propagation for you. All funs are promises of their completion too, so you can await or .catch your stream.

opts is an optional options object. The only option currently is async which let's you explicitly tell Funstream if your callbacks are sync or async. If you don't include this we'll detect which you're using by looking at the number of arguments your callback takes. Because promises and sync functions take the same number of arguments, if you're using promise returning callbacks you'll need to explicitly pass in async: true.

fun(callback[, opts]) → FunStream

This lets you bundle a fun-stream pipeline up into a single transform stream that you might pass to something else. The callback receives a FunStream as its only argument, chain off of that as you like and return the result. The stream returned by fun() will write to that first FunStream and read from the end of your chain. (With the usual error propagation.)

fun(writableStream[, opts]) → PromiseStream

Writable streams can't be fun per se, since being fun means having iterators. What we can do is make them resolvable as promises, with an extra feature or two.

fun(array[,opts]) → FunStream

Returns a funstream that will receive entries from the array one at a time while respecting back pressure.

fun(string[,opts]) → FunStream

Returns a funstream that will receive entries from the array one at a time while respecting back pressure.

fun(generator[,opts]) → FunStream

Returns a funstream that will receive values from the generator one at a time while respecting back pressure.

fun(promise[,opts]) → FunStream

Returns a funstream that will consume the result of the promise exactly as the equivalent plain value would be. No data will be emitted until the promise resolves. If it rejects it will be propagated as an error in the usual ways.

fun([opts]) → FunStream

Make a passthrough Funstream. You can pipe into this to get access to our handy methods.

fun.FunStream

Exactly the same as stream.PassThrough but with fun added. fun() is mostly the same as new fun.FunStream(). (The former will use Bluebird for promises if available but fallback to system promises. The latter has no magic and just uses system promises.)

require('funstream/fun-stream').mixin

The core extension mechanism (otherwise unneeded). It adds fun to an existing class or object. Classes that have fun mixed in need to also call FunPassThrough.funInit.call(this, opts) in their constructors.

Funstream and Pipelines

Contrary to ordinary, BORING streams, we make sure errors are passed along when we chain into something. This applies when you .map or .filter but it ALSO applies when you .pipe.

PromiseStream methods

.finished() → Promise

Available on Writable promise streams, the returned Promise will resolved when the stream emits a finish event. The promise will be rejected if the stream emits an error event.

If the stream emits a result event then the stream will resolve with that value.

.closed() → Promise

Available on Writable promise streams, the returned Promise will resolved when the stream emits a close event. The promise will be rejected if the stream emits an error event.

NOTE: Not all streams emit a close event and if you use this on a stream that does not then it will never resolve.

FunStream methods

This is the good stuff. All callbacks can be sync or async. You can indicate this by setting the async property on the opts object either when calling the method below or when constructing the objects to start with. Values of the async property propagate down the chain, for example:

.map(…, {async: true}).map(…)

The second map callback will also be assume do to be async.

Multiple sync functions of the same time will be automatically aggregated without constructing additional streams, so:

.filter(n => n < 23).filter(n => n > 5)

The second filter call actually returns the same stream object. This does mean that if you try to fork the streams in between it won't work. Sorry.

.ended() → Promise

Returns a Promise that resolves when the stream emits an end event. If the stream emits an error event then it will reject.

.pipe(target[, opts]) → FunStream(target)

Like an ordinary pipe, but funerer. In addition mutating the target into a funstream we also forward errors to it.

.head(numberOfItems) → FunStream

Will only forward the first numberOfItems down stream. The remainder are ignored. At the moment this does not end the stream after the numberOfItems limit is hit, but in future it likely will.

fun(stream)
  .head(5)
  .forEach(item => { // only sees the first five items regardless of how long the stream is.
  })

.filter(filterWith[, opts]) → FunStream

Filter the stream!

  • filterWith(data) → Boolean (can throw)
  • filterWith(data, cb) (and cb(err, shouldInclude))
  • `filterWith(data) → Promise(Boolean)

If filterWith returns true, we include the value in the output stream, otherwise not.

.map(mapWith[, opts]) → FunStream

Transform the stream!

  • mapWith(data) → newData (can throw)
  • mapWith(data, cb) (and cb(err, newData))
  • `mapWith(data) → Promise(newData)

data is replaced with newData from mapWith in the output stream.

.flat([, opts]) → FunStream

Flattens arrays in the streams into object emissions! That is to say, a stream of two objects:

[1, 2, 3], [23, 42, 57]

Will become a stream of six objects:

1, 2, 3, 23, 42, 57

This is implemented as flatMap(v => v, opts)

.flatMap([, opts]) → FunStream

Transform all the stream elements and flatten any return values. This is the equivalent of:

map().flat()

Only without multiple phases.

.sort(sortWith, opts) → FunStream

WARNING: This has to load all of your content into memory in order to sort it, so be sure to do your filtering or limiting (with .head) before you call this. This results in a funstream fed from the sorted array.

sortWith(a, b) → -1 | 0 | 1 – It's the usual sort comparison function. It must be synchronous as it's ultimately passed to Array.sort.

Sort a stream alphabetically:

fun(stream)
  .sort((a, b) => a.localeCompare(b))

.grab(grabWith, opts) → FunStream

WARNING: This has to load all of your content into memory in order to sort it, so be sure to do your filtering or limiting (with .head) before you call this. This results in a funstream fed from the sorted array.

grabWith is a synchronous function. It takes an array as an argument and turns the return value back into a stream with fun(). The array is produced by reading the entire stream, so be warned.

For example, sort can be implemented as:

function sortStream (st) {
  return st.grab(v => v.sort(sortWith))
}

It makes it easy to apply array verbs to a stream that aren't otherwise supported but it does mean loading the entire stream into memory.

It's the equivalent of fun(grabWith(await stream.list()))

.list(opts) → FunStream

Promise an array of all of the values in the stream. Let's you do things like…

const data = await fun().map().filter().list()

It's just sugar for: reduceToArray((acc, val) => acc.push(val), opts)

.concat(opts) → FunStream

Promise a string produced by concatenating all of the values in the stream.

.reduce(reduceWith[, initial[, opts]]) → FunStream

Promise the result of computing everything.

  • reduceWith(acc, value) → acc (can throw)
  • reduceWith(acc, value, cb) (and cb(err, acc))
  • `reduceWith(acc, value) → Promise(acc)

Concat a stream:

fun(stream)
  .reduce((acc, value) => acc + value)
  .then(wholeThing => { … })

The return value is also a stream, so you can hang the usual event listeners off it. Reduce streams emit a result event just before finish with the final value of the accumulator in the reduce.

.reduceToArray(reduceWith, opts) → FunStream

Promise the result of reducing into an array. Handy when you want to push on to an array without worrying about your return value. This is sugar for:

fun(stream)
  .reduce((acc, value) => { reduceWith(acc, value) ; return acc }, [])

.reduceToArray(reduceWith, opts) → FunStream

Promise the result of reducing into an array. Handy when you want to build an object without worrying about your return values. This is sugar for:

fun(stream)
  .reduce((acc, value) => { reduceWith(acc, value) ; return acc }, {})

.forEach(consumeWith[, opts]) → PromiseStream

Run some code for every chunk, promise that the stream is done.

Example, print each line:

fun(stream)
  .forEach(chunk => console.log(chunk)
  .then(() => console.log('Done!'))

As with reduce streams the return value from forEach is both a promise and a stream.

Benchmarks

map: fun sync565 ops/s
map: fun async (cb)454 ops/s
map: stream.Transform403 ops/s
map: through2311 ops/s
map: fun async (async/await)304 ops/s
map: fun async (new Promise)237