ember-singularity

2.0.0 • Public • Published

Ember Singularity

npm version Build Status

Ember Singularity integrates a Unified Event Handler service to help control DOM event listeners by taking normal DOM events and binding them to Ember Events that are triggered by a singular DOM listener.

In other words, this means that instead of having multiple listeners for a single DOM event, you have one listener for a single DOM event that then triggers multiple callbacks via Ember events.

Why do this? There are two primary motivations:

  1. Centralize control of DOM listeners: this has numerous benefits. Primary would be that it reduces the risk of memory leaks and allows optimization of the number of handlers being used. It allows an easy choke point for throttling "spammy" events. Essentially greater and easier control over DOM events not already handled by Ember.
  2. Leverage Ember's event system: this helps ensure events that cause modifications to application state or the DOM get batched into the Ember run-loop. Helping reduce churn (especially in cases such as scrolling) is a huge win when trying to make performant applications.

Usage

The available interface for the UnifiedEventHandler is pretty simple and only contains 3 available methods. That said, it is recommended that you abstract away any usage of the service via mixins or base-level components; this helps ensure the benefits described in the above motivations.

register(target, eventName, callback)

This registers a callback to be tied to a specific target and event type. The target and eventName are expected to be of type string and callback is a function. The callback will receive the original event. Here's an example:

let ScrollMixin = Ember.Mixin.extend({
  unifiedEventHandler: Ember.inject.service(),

  _registerScrollCallback: Ember.on('init', function() {
    this.get('unifiedEventHandler').register('window', 'scroll', (event) => {
      console.log('scrolled!');
      console.log(event);
    });
  })
});

unregister(target, eventName, callback)

This is the exact opposite of register() and expects the arguments to be the same as were used to register the handler. Here's an example:

let ScrollMixin = Ember.Mixin.extend({
  unifiedEventHandler: Ember.inject.service(),

  scroll() { console.log('scrolled!'); },

  _registerScrollCallback: Ember.on('init', function() {
    this.get('unifiedEventHandler').register('window', 'scroll', this.scroll);
  }),

  _unregisterScrollCallback: Ember.on('willDestroy', function() {
    this.get('unifiedEventHandler').unregister('window', 'scroll', this.scroll);
  })
});

triggerEvent(eventName)

This allows you to trigger the Ember event that your callback got bound to. As of version 1.1.0, after you register a handler it's Ember event will be of the form <event-name>.<target>. This probably won't be used often, but is available for flexibility in testing, debugging, and extending functionality. Here's a final example of the total API:

let ScrollMixin = Ember.Mixin.extend({
  unifiedEventHandler: Ember.inject.service(),

  scroll() { console.log('scrolled!'); },

  triggerScroll() {
    this.get('unifiedEventHandler').triggerEvent('window.scroll');
  },

  _registerScrollCallback: Ember.on('init', function() {
    this.get('unifiedEventHandler').register('window', 'scroll', this.scroll);
  }),

  _unregisterScrollCallback: Ember.on('willDestroy', function() {
    this.get('unifiedEventHandler').unregister('window', 'scroll', this.scroll);
  })
});

Package Sidebar

Install

npm i ember-singularity

Weekly Downloads

1,767

Version

2.0.0

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

319 kB

Total Files

12

Last publish

Collaborators

  • stefanpenner
  • trentmwillis