node package manager
Painless code sharing. npm Orgs help your team discover, share, and reuse code. Create a free org »

ember-qunit

ember-qunit Build Status

Ember QUnit simplifies unit testing of Ember applications with QUnit by providing QUnit-specific wrappers around the helpers contained in ember-test-helpers.

Usage

Component Integration Tests

import hbs from 'htmlbars-inline-precompile';
import { test, moduleForComponent } from 'ember-qunit';
 
moduleForComponent('x-foo', {
  integration: true
});
 
test('it renders', function(assert) {
  assert.expect(2);
 
  // setup the outer context
  this.set('value', 'cat');
  this.on('action', function(result) {
    assert.equal(result, 'bar', 'The correct result was returned');
  });
 
  // render the component
  this.render(hbs`
    {{ x-foo value=value action="result" }}
  `);
 
  assert.equal(this.$('div>.value').text(), 'cat', 'The component shows the correct value');
 
  this.$('button').click();
});

Component integration tests are the default mode for moduleForComponent. You can still explicitly activate them by passing integration: true.

Integration tests have the advantage of testing your component as Ember would actually use them. It's helpful to think of this mode as simply testing the inputs and outputs of the component. These tests allow you interact with both the bound values that are passed into the component as well as its resulting actions.

Component integration tests have the following features:

  • Your test context this acts as the outer context for the component. As a result, you can call this.set and this.on to setup values and event listeners that you can then have interact with the component.
  • You are required to render the component as a template, e.g. this.render(hbs`{{ your-component-name value=value action="updated" }}`). You can render other components as well as block content.
  • All of the normal Ember lifecycle hooks for a component are called (including the new ones from 1.13.x).
  • Testing the component's template is through this.$().
  • You do not require dependencies through needs:. Doing so will force the test into unit mode.
  • You do not have direct access to the component instance. (this.subject() will raise an exception).

Component Unit Tests

Ember Guide

import { test, moduleForComponent } from 'ember-qunit';
 
moduleForComponent('x-foo', {
  unit: true,
  needs: ['helper:pluralize-string']
});
 
// run a test
test('it renders', function(assert) {
  assert.expect(1);
 
  // creates the component instance
  var subject = this.subject();
 
  // render the component on the page
  this.render();
  assert.equal(this.$('.foo').text(), 'bar');
});

Unit tests used to be the default mode for component tests. To flag a test as a unit test, either specify unit: true or include needs: [] in the callbacks object.

Unit tests have the advantage of giving you direct access to the component instance so you can test its internals. Unit tests have the following features:

  • You have access to the component instance through this.subject().
  • If you want to render the component's template, call either this.render() or this.$().
  • Testing the component's template is through this.$().
  • You are required to specify any dependencies other than the component's template in the needs: [] option. This includes helpers, services, partials, and any other components (with their templates) that are referenced.
  • Unit tests do not call most of the Ember lifecycle hooks. didInsertElement and willDestroyElement will be called, but the remaining hooks introduced in Ember 1.13.x will not be.
  • There is no outer context for the component so testing things such as actions will require directly stubbing the actions on the component.

Other Tests

Controllers Guide

Routes Guide

import { test, moduleFor } from 'ember-qunit';
 
moduleFor('controller:home');
 
test('It can calculate the result', function(assert) {
  assert.expect(1);
 
  var subject = this.subject();
 
  subject.set('value', 'foo');
  assert.equal(subject.get('result'), 'bar');
});

moduleFor works for any object you could look up with the Ember Resolver (service, routes, controllers, etc.).

Note: Controllers / Routes do not have access to rendering. You will need to either use a component test or an acceptance test.

Ember Data Tests

Ember Guide

import { test, moduleForModel } from 'ember-qunit';
 
moduleForModel('user', {
  needs: ['model:child']
});
 
test('It can set its child', function(assert) {
  assert.expect(1);
  var subject = this.subject();
 
  var child = subject.store.createRecord('child');
  subject.get('children').pushObject(child);
 
  assert.equal(subject.get('some-computed-value'), true);
});

Advanced Usage

Setting the resolver

// if you don't have a custom resolver, do it like this:
setResolver(Ember.DefaultResolver.create({ namespace: App }));
 
// otherwise something like:
import Resolver from './path/to/resolver';
import { setResolver } from 'ember-qunit';
setResolver(Resolver.create());

Async Example

Under the hood, if you use Ember.RSVP.Promise, ember-qunit will call QUnit's start and stop helpers to stop the test from tearing down and running other tests while your asynchronous code runs. ember-qunit also asserts that the promise gets fulfilled.

In addition, you can also return promises in the test body:

// If you return a promise from a test callback it becomes an asyncTest. This
// is a key difference between ember-qunit and standard QUnit.
test('async is awesome', function(assert) {
  assert.expect(1);
  var myThing = MyThing.create();
  // myThing.exampleMethod() returns a promise
  return myThing.exampleMethod().then(function() {
    assert.ok(myThing.get('finished'));
  });
});

If an error is thrown in your promise or a promise within test becomes rejected, ember-qunit will fail the test. To assert that a promise should be rejected, you can "catch" the error and assert that you got there:

test('sometimes async gets rejected', function(assert) {
  assert.expect(1);
  var myThing = MyThing.create()
 
  return myThing.exampleMethod().then(function() {
    assert.ok(false, "promise should not be fulfilled");
  })['catch'](function(err) {
    assert.equal(err.message, "User not Authorized");
  });
});

Test Helpers

moduleFor(fullName [, description [, callbacks]])

  • fullName: (String) - The full name of the unit, ie controller:application, route:index.

  • description: (String) optional - The description of the module

  • callbacks: (Object) optional

    • QUnit callbacks (beforeEach and afterEach)
    • ember-test-helpers callback (subject)
    • integration: true or unit: true (default: integration: true)
    • needs specify any dependencies the tested module will require.

moduleForComponent(name, [description, callbacks])

  • name: (String) - the short name of the component that you'd use in a template, ie x-foo, ic-tabs, etc.

  • description: (String) optional - The description of the module

  • callbacks: (Object) optional

    • QUnit callbacks (beforeEach and afterEach)
    • ember-test-helpers callback (subject)
    • integration: true or unit: true (default: integration: true)
    • needs specify any dependencies the tested module will require. (Including this will force your test into unit mode).

moduleForModel(name, [description, callbacks])

  • name: (String) - the short name of the model you'd use in store operations ie user, assignmentGroup, etc.

  • description: (String) optional - The description of the module

  • callbacks: (Object) optional

    • QUnit callbacks (beforeEach and afterEach)
    • ember-test-helpers callback (subject)
    • integration: true or unit: true (default: integration: true)
    • needs specify any dependencies the tested module will require.

Contributing

Installation

  • git clone <repository-url> this repository
  • cd ember-qunit
  • npm install

Running

Running Tests

  • npm test (Runs ember try:each to test your addon against multiple Ember versions)
  • ember test
  • ember test --server

Building

  • ember build

For more information on using ember-cli, visit https://ember-cli.com/.