dynamic-styles
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0.0.9 • Public • Published

🏃‍♀ Dynamic Styles

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Dynamic Css-in-Js styles engine, based on Emotion


Create dynamic stylesheets and link them to functional components using the React hook pattern.

  • Build on top of @emotion/react: As fast and lightweight as emotion
  • Supports all emotion features: lazy evaluation, dynamic theming, etc.
  • Fully featured TypeScript support
  • Server side rendering support: Next.js, Gatsby or any other environment
  • @emotion cache support
  • 🟨 Well tested (working on it)
// Create dynamic stylesheet that has access to the previously specified theme and parameters
const useStyles = styleSheet.create(({theme, params}) => ({
    root: /* Dynamic Styles */,
    button: /* Dynamic Styles */,
    text: /* Dynamic Styles */,
}));

const MyComponent = (props) => {
    // Access dynamic styles as class names using the created 'useStyles()' hook 
    // and specify the corresponding parameters
    const { classes } = useStyles({ color: props.color, fontSize: 10 });
    
    return (
      <div className={classes.root}>
          {/* */}
      </div>
    );
}

💻 Installation

$ yarn add dynamic-styles @emotion/react
# or
$ npm install dynamic-styles @emotion/react

⛳️ Code Sandbox

🪁 Basic usage

📂 ./styles.js

To create any styles, we must first instantiate a top-level StyleSheet instance. This StyleSheet instance will be used to create dynamic and reusable stylesheets later. In the configuration object that the createStylesheet() method takes up, we can specify our application's current theme. We can easily access this theme in the stylesheets we create later.

import { createStyleSheet } from 'dynamic-styles';

// Initialization of a StyleSheet instance called 'styleSheet'
export const styleSheet = createStyleSheet({
    theme: {
        primaryColor: "#aa11ee",
        backgroundColor: "#f3f6f4"
    }
});

📂 ./Demo.jsx

In our React Component (MyComponent.jsx) we can now use the instantiated top-level StyleSheet instance to create a dynamic stylesheet for the Component. Such a dynamic stylesheet can contain multiple styles clustered in understandable chunks for the different parts of our Component. For example, styles for the root container and some text contained in the Component.

import React from "react";
import { css } from "@emotion/react";
import { styleSheet } from "./styles";

// Specify dynamic styles and access them later in any React Component 
// with the returned 'useStyles()' hook.
const useStyles = styleSheet.create(
    ({theme, params}) => ({
        // Styles of the specified selectors can be created using a css object, ..
        root: {
            backgroundColor: params.color,
            "&:hover": {
                backgroundColor: theme.primaryColor,
            },
        },
        
        // .. or the common 'css()' method provided by '@emotion/react'
        text: css`
           font-weight: bold;
           font-size: ${params.fontSize}px;
           color: black;
           margin: 0;
        `
    }),
);

We use the useStyles() hook, to access the specified styles in the corresponding Component (Demo) and feed it with dynamic parameters (params).

const Demo = (props) => {
    const { className } = props;
    const [color, setColor] = React.useState("yellow");

    // Use the created 'useStyles()' hook to access the specified styles as class names
    // and some utility functions like 'cx()' for merging class names.
    const { classes, cx } = useStyles({ color, fontSize: 30 });

    return (
        <div className={cx(classes.root, className)}>
            <p className={classes.text}>hello world</p>
            <input value={color} onChange={(e) => setColor(e.target.value)} />
        </div>
    );
}

Live Demo

🔗 Classes merging with cx()

To merge class names, we should use the cx() method returned by useStyles(). It has the same API as the popular clsx package but is optimized for the use with emotion.

The key advantage of cx() is that it detects emotion generated class names ensuring styles are overwritten in the correct order. Emotion-generated styles are applied from left to right. Subsequent styles overwrite property values of previous styles.

import React from "react";
import { styleSheet } from "./styles";

const useStyles = styleSheet.create(({theme}) => ({
  button: {
    backgroundColor: "gray",
    border: 0,
    color: "black",
    borderRadius: 5,
    padding: "10px 20px",
    margin: 5,
    cursor: "pointer"
  },

  highlight: {
    backgroundColor: theme.primaryColor,
    color: "black",
    padding: 20
  },

  bold: {
    fontWeight: 1000,
    textDecoration: "underline"
  }  
}));

const Demo = () => {
  const [active, setActive] = React.useState(0);
  const { classes, cx } = useStyles();

  return (
    <div>
      <button
        // Merge styles (class names) using the 'cx()' method
        className={cx(classes.button, { [classes.highlight]: active === 0 })}
        onClick={() => setActive(0)}
      >
        First
      </button>
      <button
        // Merge styles (class names) using the 'cx()' method  
        className={cx(classes.button, classes.bold, { [classes.highlight]: active === 1 })}
        onClick={() => setActive(1)}
      >
        Second (Bold)
      </button>
    </div>
  );
}

Live Demo

🟦 Typescript

The dynamic-styles API is fully type-safe. Let's take a look at the Basic usage example converted to Typescript (see below). The only part worth mentioning that has changed compared to the Javascript example is that we put withParams() in front of the create() method. This is necessary to tell the create() method the desired type (e.g. DemoStyles) of the params property.

Why `withParams()`?

In case you are wondering why we need to go this extra step, and use withParams<ParamsType>() to specify the params generic. Instead of just specifying the generic in the create() method like create<ParamsType>().

Well, that's because partial type inference is not possible in Typescript. If we were to specify the params generic in the create() method (like create<ParamsType>()) which, by the way, is possible we would lose the type inference of the stylesheet object. Thus, we would have to specify it manually (e.g. create<ParamsType, StyleSheetType>()).

import React from "react";
import { css } from "@emotion/react";
import { StyleItem } from "dynamic-styles";
import { styleSheet } from "./styles";

type DemoStyles = {
    color: string;
    fontSize: number;
}

type DemoStyleSheet = {
    root: StyleItem;
    text: StyleItem;
    button: StyleItem;
}

const useStyles = styleSheet.create<DemoStyles, DemoStyleSheet>(
    ({theme, params}) => ({
        root: {
            backgroundColor: params.color,
            "&:hover": {
                backgroundColor: theme.primaryColor,
            },
        },
        text: /* More Styles */,
        button: /* More Styles */
    }),
);
import React from "react";
import { css } from "@emotion/react";
import { styleSheet } from "./styles";

type DemoStyles = {
  color: string;
  fontSize: number;
}

// Specify dynamic styles and access them later in any React Component 
// with the returned 'useStyles()' hook.
const useStyles = styleSheet
  .withParams<DemoStyles>() // <- CHANGE | Specify the 'params' type as generic
  .create(
    ({theme, params}) => ({
        // Styles of the specified selectors can be created using a css object, ..
        root: {
            backgroundColor: params.color,
            "&:hover": {
                backgroundColor: theme.primaryColor,
            },
        },
        
        // .. or the common 'css()' method provided by '@emotion/react'
        text: css`
           font-weight: bold;
           font-size: ${params.fontSize}px;
           color: black;
           margin: 0;
        `
    }),
);

In the actual Component where we include the created stylesheet with the useStyles() hook, we don't need to make any adjustments to achieve full type safety.

const Demo: React.FC<DemoProps> = (props) => {
    const { className } = props;
    const [color, setColor] = React.useState("yellow");

    // Use the created 'useStyles()' hook to access the specified styles as class names
    // and some utility functions like 'cx()' for merging class names.
    const { classes, cx } = useStyles({ color, fontSize: 30 });

    return (
        <div className={cx(classes.root, className)}>
            <p className={classes.text}>hello world</p>
            <input value={color} onChange={(e) => setColor(e.target.value)} />
        </div>
    );
}

Live Demo

⚗️ Composition and nested selectors

To use a selector (e.g. button styles) in other parts of the stylesheet, we need to create a reference to it. This is necessary because the created useStyles() hook uses scoped class names to represent the specified stylesheet. An established reference created to a selector (e.g. prefix-ref_button_1), however, remains static. In order to create such a reference, we can use the createRef() method, which is given to the create() method.

import React from "react";
import { styleSheet } from "./styles";

const useStyles = styleSheet.create(({theme, params, createRef, assignRef}) => {
  // Create reference for future use
  const button = createRef('button'); // Returns a static selector (e.g. 'prefix-ref_button_1')

  return {
    // Assign ref variant 1:
    button: {
      // Assign the reference to the selector via the 'ref' property
      ref: button,

      // and add any other style properties
      backgroundColor: theme.primaryColor,
      border: 0,
      color: "black",
      padding: `10px 20px`,
      borderRadius: 5,
      cursor: 'pointer',
    },
      
    // Assign ref variant 2:
    // Assign the reference to the selector via the 'assignRef()' method
    button2: assignRef(button, {
        // and add any other style properties
        backgroundColor: theme.primaryColor,
        border: 0,
        color: "black",
        padding: `10px 20px`,
        borderRadius: 5,
        cursor: 'pointer',
    }),

    container: {
      display: 'flex',
      justifyContent: 'center',
      backgroundColor: theme.backgroundColor,
      padding: 50,

      // Reference button with the previously created static selector
      [`&:hover .${button}`]: {
        backgroundColor: "rred",
      },
    },
  };
});

const Demo = () => {
  const { classes } = useStyles();
  return (
    <div className={classes.container}>
      <button className={classes.button} type="button">
        Hover container to change button color
      </button>
    </div>
  );
}

Live Demo

🎥 Keyframes

We can define animations using the keyframes helper from @emotion/react. keyframes takes in a css keyframe definition and returns an object we can use in the corresponding styles. We can use strings or objects just like css to create such css keyframes.

import React from "react";
import { keyframes } from "@emotion/react";
import { styleSheet } from "./styles";

// Define keyframes with the 'keyframes()' method from '@emotion/react'
const bounce = keyframes`
  from, 20%, 53%, 80%, to {
    transform: translate3d(0, 0, 0);
  }

  40%, 43% {
    transform: translate3d(0, 30px, 0);
  }

  70% {
    transform: translate3d(0, 15px, 0);
  }

  90% {
    transform: translate3d(0, 4px,0);
  }
`

const useStyles = styleSheet.create({
  container: {
    textAlign: 'center',
    // Use created 'bounce' keyframes in the 'container' styles  
    animation: `${bounce} 3s ease-in-out infinite`,
  }
});

const Demo = () => {
  const { classes } = useStyles();
  return <div className={classes.container}>Keyframes demo</div>;
}

Live Demo

🌍 Global styles

Sometimes we might want to insert global css styles. We can use the <GlobalStyles /> component to do this.

import React from "react";
import { GlobalStyles } from "dynamic-styles";
import { useTheme } from "./useTheme";

const App = () => {
  const theme = useTheme();
    
  return (
      <>
          {/* Specify global Styles at the root of your App */}
          <GlobalStyles
              styles={{
                  '*, *::before, *::after': {
                      boxSizing: 'border-box',
                  },

                  body: {
                      backgroundColor: theme.colorScheme === 'dark' ? theme.black : theme.white,
                      color: theme.colorScheme === 'dark' ? theme.white : theme.black,
                      lineHeight: 20,
                  },
              }}
          />

          {/* The actual App */}
          <YourApp />
      </>
  );
}

Live Demo

🌈 normalize.css

In a web environment it is often necessary to 'normalize' the css, which makes the browsers render all elements more consistently and in line with modern standards. The NormalizeCss Component sets the normalized styles specified in normalize.css globally.

import { NormalizeCSS } from "dynamic-styles";

const App = () => {
    return (
        <>
          <NormalizeCSS />
          <YourApp />
        </>
    );
}

Live Demo

✍️ Inline styles

Often we need to create reusable Components that should be customizable later on, among other things with inline styles. We can easily make Components customizable with inline styles by specifying the styles property (e.g. partial of specified stylesheet) in the useStyles() hook's configuration object.

./components/Button.tsx

Here we create a reusable Button that can be styled via inline styles using the styles property.

import React from "react";
import { UseStylesExtractStylesType } from "dynamic-styles";
import { styleSheet } from "../styles";

const useStyles = styleSheet
  .withParams<ButtonStyles>()
  .create(({theme, params: { color, radius }}) => ({
    root: {
        color: theme.colors.white,
        backgroundColor: color,
        borderRadius: radius,
        padding: '10px 20px',
        cursor: 'pointer',
    },
}));

type ButtonStyles = {
    color: string;
    radius: number;
};

// Create type that represents the created stylesheet type (extracted from the 'useStyles()' hook).
// This type can be used to add a typesafe 'styles' property to the Button component.
export type ExtractedStylesType = UseStylesExtractStylesType<typeof useStyles>;

export const Button: React.FC<ButtonProps> = (props) => {
  const { color = 'blue', radius = 0, styles = {}, onClick } = props;
  // Pass the 'styles' property to the 'useStyles()' hook
  const { classes } = useStyles({ color, radius }, { styles, name: 'Button' });

  return (
    <button type="button" className={classes.root} onClick={onClick}>
      {color} button with {radius}px radius
    </button>
  );
};

type ButtonProps = {
    color?: string;
    radius?: number;
    styles?: ExtractedStylesType; // Specify the 'styles' prop with full type safety based on the created stylesheet
    onClick: () => void;
};

./Demo.tsx

Use the created Button Component and specify inline styles with the styles property.

import React from "react";
import { css } from "@emotion/react";
import { Button } from "./components/Button";

const Demo: React.FC = () => {
  const [toggled, setToggled] = React.useState(false);  
    
  return (
    <div>
        <Button
            onClick={() => setToggled(!toggled)}
            // Inline styles using the 'styles' property
            styles={{
              root: css`
                  background: ${toggled ? "green" : "gray"};
                  font-weight: bold;
                  border-radius: 50px;
              `,
            }}
        />
    </div>
  );
};

Live Demo



🔨 API documentation

coming soon



FAQ

Click to expand

React-Native StyleSheet vs dynamic-styles

dynamic-styles React-Native Stylesheet
Compatible with React-Native
Compatible with React
Access global theme 🟨
Influence styles via props of the Component
Styling with JavaScript Object
Styling with Emotion styles

Why dynamic-styles and not just using tss-react?

Because tss-react was explicitly designed as a replacement for the makeStyle() API deprecated in Material UI 5 and thus isn't optimized for general use (without Material UI). Also, did it not meet all my needs, such as creating styles with the css() method provided by Emotion and wasn't fully typesafe.

const useStyles = styleSheet.create((theme, params) => ({
    root: css`
       // Write styles as in CSS and not in the form of an object
    `,
}));

🎉 Inspired by:

The syntax of dynamic-styles is inspired by the React Native Stylesheet API. Under the hood, we have been partly inspired by TSS-React and Mantine-Styles.

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npm i dynamic-styles

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