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    crow-api
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    2.4.0 • Public • Published

    Crow API

    Crow API lets you build an API intuitively based on the file structure of a project. Provide API Gateway and Lambda function configurations and crow will build out the appropriate paths and methods to the API Gateway. All created resources are available after initialization. lambdaFunctions will expose all Lambda functions created for further operations like adding environment variables and providing permissions.

    crow-api version aws-cdk version Notes
    0 1
    1 2 Not recommended for use
    2 2

    Contents:

    Getting Started

    Start your application as a normal CDK app

    npm install -g aws-cdk
    cdk bootstrap # If this is your first cdk app, you will need to bootstrap your AWS account
    cdk init app --language typescript

    Next, install the Crow API package

    npm install --save crow-api

    In the lib/ folder generated by the cdk, there should be a single file named <your-app>-stack.js. Create your Crow API construct inside of that file like so

    import { Stack, StackProps } from 'aws-cdk-lib';
    import { Construct } from 'constructs';
    import { CrowApi, ICrowApiProps } from 'crow-api';
    
    interface IYourAppStackProps extends StackProps {
      crowApiProps: ICrowApiProps,
    }
    
    export class YourAppStack extends Stack {
      constructor(scope: Construct, id: string, props: IYourAppStackProps) {
        super(scope, id, props);
    
        const {
          crowApiProps,
        } = props;
    
        const api = new CrowApi(this, 'api', {
          ...crowApiProps,
        });
      }
    }

    Your API will start to take shape as you create folders to define paths and methods (see Example File Structure below). To deploy your API, simply run cdk synth and cdk deploy. Follow the instructions as they are prompted, and you will end up receiving a URL where your API now lives.

    Example File Structure

    |-- src/
        |-- authorizer/
            |-- index.js
        |-- v1/
            |-- book/
                |-- get/
                    |-- index.js
                |-- post/
                    |-- index.js
            |-- chapters/
                |-- get/
                    |-- index.js
            |-- authors/
                |-- get/
                    |-- index.js
                |-- post/
                    |-- index.js
    

    The preceding file structure will create an API with the following routes:

    • GET /v1/book
    • POST /v1/book
    • GET /v1/book/chapters
    • GET /v1/authors
    • POST /v1/authors

    There needs to be an index.js file inside of a folder named after an HTTP method in order for a path to be created. The index.js file needs to export a handler method that will process the payload and return like the following.

    exports.handler = async function (event, context, callback) {
      try {
        const data = {
          statusCode: 201,
        };
        return data;
      } catch (uncaughtError) {
        console.error(uncaughtError);
        throw uncaughtError;
      }
    }

    Crow API Props

    Crow API takes in a few props to help you customize away from defaults.

    sourceDirectory

    By default, Crow walks through the src directory in the root of the repository to determine routes and methods, but you can change the top level directory by passing in the sourceDirectory prop. The string passed in should not start with or end with a slash (/). For example, src, api/src, or source are all valid options to pass in through that prop.

    sharedDirectory

    By default, Crow creates a Lambda layer out of the shared directory in the source directory of the repository, but you can change the name of the shared directory by passing in the sharedDirectory prop. The string passed in should not start with or end with a slash (/) and must be a direct child of the source directory. For example, common or utils are valid but shared/utils is not.

    The Lambda layer created will be prepended to any the of the layers passed in through lambdaConfigurations and added to all Lambda functions created.

    useAuthorizerLambda

    Crow will create and attach an authorizer Lambda to specific methods if requested. The useAuthorizerLambda prop tells the CrowApi Construct that it should create an authorizer Lambda and accepts a boolean value. This is false by default.

    authorizerDirectory

    Crow will allow for a Lambda authorizer to be created and used by specific methods if requested. The authorizerDirectory prop tells Crow where to find the code for the Lambda authorizer within the source directory which can be specified in the sourceDirectory prop. It expects to find an index.js file that exports a handler function within the authorizerDirectory.

    By default, Crow expects to find a directory called src/authorizer containing the authorizer Lambda source if the useAuthorizerLambda prop is true. If a different directory within the source directory should be looked at for this code, it should be specified by passing in a string to the authorizerDirectory prop. The string passed in should not start with nor end with a slash (/). For example, auth or authLambdaSrc are valid.

    authorizerLambdaConfiguration

    The authorizerLambdaConfiguration prop is passed directly to the Lambda functions which will be in charge of your API's authorization. The configuration allowed is exactly the same as the Lambda Function props.

    tokenAuthorizerConfiguration

    The tokenAuthorizerConfiguration prop is passed directly to the APIGateway.TokenAuthorizer construct which will be in charge of your API's authorization. Anything available in the class constructor for the TokenAuthorizer can be overridden.

    Note:

    Be careful with this configuration item as all configuration here takes precedence over Crow defaults. I suggest not using this configuration item unless you are experienced with the AWS CDK, API Gateway, and Lambda.

    createApiKey

    By default, Crow does not create an API key associated with the API. If an API key is desired, pass in the createApiKey prop as true.

    logRetention

    By default, Crow creates log groups for resources it creates and sets the log retention to one week. If a different retention is desired pass in the logRetention prop of enum type RetentionDays.

    apiGatewayConfiguration

    This props allows for more complex overrides to the API Gateway that fronts your API. The configuration allowed is exactly the same as the RestApi props.

    Note:

    Be careful with this configuration item as all configuration here takes precedence over Crow defaults. I suggest not using this configuration item unless you are experienced with the AWS CDK and API Gateway.

    An example of this prop might look like the following:

    #!/usr/bin/env node
    import 'source-map-support/register';
    import * as cdk from 'aws-cdk-lib';
    import * as apigateway from 'aws-cdk-lib/aws-apigateway';
    import { CrowApiStack } from '../lib/crow-api-stack';
    
    const devEnvironment = {
      account: '123456789012',
      region: 'us-east-1',
    };
    
    const app = new cdk.App();
    
    new CrowApiStack(app, 'CrowApiStack', {
      env: devEnvironment,
      apiGatewayConfiguration: {
        endpointConfiguration: {
          types: [apigateway.EndpointType.REGIONAL],
        },
      },
    });

    apiGatewayName

    This is a simple prop that names the API Gateway. This is how the API will be identified in the AWS console. The value should be a string without spaces and defaults to crow-api.

    lambdaConfigurations

    This props allows for more complex overrides to Lambda functions. The prop is an object with keys corresponding to the API path of a Lambda function and a value corresponding to the configuration that should be applied to the Lambda. The configuration allowed is exactly the same as the Lambda Function props.

    Note:

    Be careful with this configuration item as all configuration here takes precedence over Crow defaults. I suggest not using this configuration item unless you are experienced with the AWS CDK and Lambda.

    An example of this prop might look like the following:

    #!/usr/bin/env node
    import 'source-map-support/register';
    import * as cdk from 'aws-cdk-lib';
    import { CrowApiStack } from '../lib/crow-api-stack';
    
    const devEnvironment = {
      account: '123456789012',
      region: 'us-east-1',
    };
    
    const app = new cdk.App();
    
    new CrowApiStack(app, 'CrowApiStack', {
      env: devEnvironment,
      lambdaConfigurations: {
        '/v1/book/get': {
          timeout: cdk.Duration.seconds(5),
        },
      },
    });

    lambdaIntegrationOptions

    This prop is an object with keys corresponding to the API path of a Lambda function and a value corresponding to the configuration that should be applied to the Lambda Integration. The configuration allowed is exactly the same as the LambdaIntegrationOptions.

    models

    This prop helps set up the Models used in methodConfiguration above. It is an array of CrowModelOptions which are the same as MethodOptions except that the modelName is required. The Models will receive an ID equal to its modelName which is why that prop is required. The IModel can then be referenced in methodConfigurations using its modelName.

    requestValidators

    This prop helps set up the RequestValidators used in methodConfiguration above. It is an array of CrowRequestValidatorOptions which are the same as RequestValidatorOptions except that the requestValidatorName is required. The RequestValidators will receive an ID equal to its requestValidatorName which is why that prop is required. The IRequestValidator can then be referenced in methodConfigurations using its requestValidatorName.

    methodConfigurations

    This prop allows for more complex overrides to individual methods. The prop is an object with keys corresponding to the API path of a method and a value corresponding to the configuration that should be applied to the method as well as the key useAuthorizerLambda which will invoke the authorizer Lambda whenever the method is called. The configuration allowed is almost exactly the same as MethodOptions plus the useAuthorizerLambda boolean.

    The differences between MethodOptions and Crow's CrowMethodConfiguration (the type for this prop) is that any value referencing { [string]: IModel } (MethodOptions.requestModels and MethodResponse.responseModels) has been changed to { [string]: string } and similarly requestValidator has been changed from IRequestValidator to string. The strings that are passed should correspond with the modelNames or requestValidatorNames used in the models and requestValidators props (see next sections).

    Note:

    If createApiKey is true, then the apiKeyRequired parameter will need to be set for the methods needing the API key.

    An example of this prop might look like the following:

    #!/usr/bin/env node
    import 'source-map-support/register';
    import * as cdk from 'aws-cdk-lib';
    import { CrowApiStack } from '../lib/crow-api-stack';
    
    const devEnvironment = {
      account: '123456789012',
      region: 'us-east-1',
    };
    
    const app = new cdk.App();
    
    new CrowApiStack(app, 'CrowApiStack', {
      env: devEnvironment,
      models: [
        {
          modelName: 'authorsPost',
          schema: {
            schema: apigateway.JsonSchemaVersion.DRAFT4,
            title: '/v1/authors/post',
            type: apigateway.JsonSchemaType.OBJECT,
            required: ['name'],
            properties: {
              name: {
                type: apigateway.JsonSchemaType.STRING,
              },
            },
          },
        },
      ],
      methodConfigurations: {
        '/v1/authors/post': {
          apiKeyRequired: true,
          requestModels: {
            'application/json': 'authorsPost',
          },
        },
        '/v1/book/get': {
          useAuthorizerLambda: true,
        },
        '/v1/book/post': {
          apiKeyRequired: true,
        },
      },
    });

    Properties

    A CrowApi construct will give full access to all of the resources it created.

    gateway

    This is the apigateway.RestApi that all of the created Lambda functions sit behind.

    usagePlan

    This is the apigateway.UsagePlan associated with the API Gateway and pre-created API key if that is enabled.

    authorizer

    This is the apigateway.IAuthorizer that is attached to the API Gateway.

    authorizerLambda

    This is the lambda.Function that authorizes API Gateway requests.

    lambdaLayer

    If the sharedDirectory is populated, this is the lambda.LayerVersion created for that code. If the sharedDirectory is not populated, then this is undefined.

    lambdaFunctions

    This is an object with keys being the API paths and the values being the lambda.Functions sitting being them. Continuing off of the example file structure from above, the following would be an example of referencing GET /v1/book/chapters.

    import { Stack, StackProps } from 'aws-cdk-lib';
    import { Construct } from 'constructs';
    import { CrowApi, ICrowApiProps } from 'crow-api';
    
    interface IYourAppStackProps extends StackProps {
      crowApiProps: ICrowApiProps,
    }
    
    export class YourAppStack extends Stack {
      constructor(scope: Construct, id: string, props: IYourAppStackProps) {
        super(scope, id, props);
    
        const {
          crowApiProps,
        } = props;
    
        const api = new CrowApi(this, 'api', {
          ...crowApiProps,
        });
    
        const lambda = api.lambdaFunctions['/v1/book/chapters/get'];
        lambda.addEnvironment('FOO', 'bar');
      }
    }

    models

    This is an object with keys being the modelNames and values being the IModels created.

    requestValidators

    This is an object with keys being the requestValidatorNames and values being the IRequestValidators created.

    Install

    npm i crow-api

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    84

    Version

    2.4.0

    License

    Apache-2.0

    Unpacked Size

    1.23 MB

    Total Files

    90

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • thomasstep