cooperate

2.0.3 • Public • Published

cooperate

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cooperate is a convention based composition tool that let's you compose a series of objects into a single object quickly. It does not alter the original objects or prototypes but wraps them in a proxy object. The proxy object will forward the method calls to the appropriate underlying object methods and perserves the appropriate behaviour of your getters and setters too.

See Change Log for changes from previous versions.

Installation

npm install cooperate -S

Why use it?

Inheritance can be a bit of a pain for many reasons and a great alternative is to use composition. This is traditionally done like this:

class MainClass {
 
  constructor(capability1, capability2) {
    this.capability1_ = capability1;
    this.capability2_ = capability2;
  }
 
  doStuff(value) {
    this.capability1_.doStuff(value);
  }
 
  doMoreStuff(value) {
    this.capability2_.doMoreStuff(value);
  }
 
}
 
const capability1 = new Capability1();
const capability2 = new Capability2();
 
const combined = new MainClass(capability1, capability2);

While this approach avoids some of the pain points of inheritance it does require you do a lot of method forwarding which is repetitive, time-consuming and boring. That's where cooperate comes in. cooperate inspects the objects that you would like to combine and does all that method forwarding for you with a single line of code.

 
import { compose } from "cooperate";
 
const capability1 = new Capability1();
const capability2 = new Capability2();
 
const combined = compose([capability1, capability2]);

JavaScript does not really have the concept of privacy but it is very common for developers to use an _ to mark methods as private. cooperate follows this convention and will not expose anything that begins or ends with an _ on the combined object.

Detailed Example

import { compose } from "cooperate";
import assert from "assert";
 
class SpecificFeatures {
 
  constructor(db) {
    this._db = db;
  }
 
  getSalesByRegion(regionName) {
 
    const query = this.formatQuery_(regionName);
 
    return this._db.query(query);
  }
 
  formatQuery_(regionName) {
    return { region: regionName };
  }
 
}
 
class GenericFeatures {
 
  constructor(db) {
    this._db = db;
  }
 
  get connected() { return this._db.connected; }
 
  insert(data) {
    this._db.insert(data);
  }
 
  findById(id) {
    return this._db.query({ _id: id });
  }
 
}
const db = {};
 
const genericFeatures = new GenericFeatures(db);
const specificFeatures = new SpecificFeatures(db);
 
const repo = compose([genericFeatures, specificFeatures]);
 
// Creates an object with no shared state
assert(repo.findById);
assert(repo.getSalesByRegion);
assert(repo.insert);
assert(Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(repo, "connected"));
 
// private members are not exposed
assert(repo.formatQuery_ === undefined);
assert(Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(repo, "_db") === undefined);

Dealing with naming collisions

With any form of composition you will eventually come across a problem with two things that have the same name. cooperate will throw an error if you try and do this as it cannot decide what to do without your help.

Mapping Members

To help with this problem, cooperate provides the mapMembers() function. This lets you define your method forward rules per object.

Example 1

import { compose, mapMembers } from "cooperate";
 
const genericFeatures = new GenericFeatures(db);
const specificFeatures = new SpecificFeatures(db);
 
const genericWithMapping = mapMembers(genericFeatures)
  .map("findById").to("findSalesById");
 
const repo = compose([genericWithMapping, specificFeatures]);
 
// Method is remapped
assert(repo.findSalesById);
assert(repo.findById === undefined);

Example 2

 
import { compose, mapMembers } from "cooperate";
import createRepo from "./Repo";
 
const product = createRepo("products");
const sale = createRepo("sales");
 
const productWithMapping = mapMembers(product)
  .map("getItem").to("getProduct")
  .map("updateItem").to("updateProduct")
  .map("insertItem").to("insertProduct")
  .map("deleteItem").to("deleteProduct");
 
const salesWithMapping = mapMembers(sale)
  .map("getItem").to("getSale")
  .map("updateItem").to("updateSale")
  .map("insertItem").to("insertSale")
  .map("deleteItem").to("deleteSale");
 
const combinedRepo = compose([productWithMapping, salesWithMapping]);
 

Hiding Members

The mapMembers() can also be used with members that you don't want to expose on the cooperate object. This can be achieved with the hide() method.

import { compose, mapMembers } from "cooperate";
import assert from "assert";
 
const genericFeatures = new GenericFeatures(db);
const specificFeatures = new SpecificFeatures(db);
 
const genericWithMapping = mapMembers(genericFeatures)
  .map("findById").to("findSalesById")
  .hide("deleteItem");
 
const repo = compose([genericWithMapping, specificFeatures]);
 
assert(repo.findSalesById);
assert(repo.findById === undefined);
assert(repo.deleteItem === undefined);

If the objects you are trying to compose have a uniform interface then there is also an option on the compose() method to make this easier.

import { compose } from "cooperate";
import assert from "assert";
 
// Assume all three capabilities here support a property called isWorking.
import capability1 from "./ capability1";
import capability2 from "./ capability2"; 
import capability3 from "./ capability3";
 
const service = compose([capability1, capability2, capability3], { hide: ["isWorking"] });
 
// no naming collisions and no isWorking property on the resulting object
assert(service.isWorking === undefined);

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Install

npm i cooperate

Weekly Downloads

29

Version

2.0.3

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

16 kB

Total Files

7

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  • midknight41