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commands-events

1.0.3 • Public • Published

commands-events

commands-events provides commands and events for DDD-based applications.

Installation

$ npm install commands-events

Quick start

First, you need to add a reference to the commands-events module. Since you will use its Command and Event constructor functions, it's most probably a good idea to reference them directly.

const { Command, Event } = require('commands-events');

Using commands

Creating commands

If you need to create a command, call the Command constructor function and provide the appropriate parameters.

const command = new Command({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'ping'
});

Most of the times, you will want to attach data to the command. For that provide a data property when creating the command. If you omit the data property, it will be set to an empty object.

const command = new Command({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'ping',
  data: {
    ttl: 10 * 1000
  }
});

If, additionally, you need to add metadata to the command, specify its custom property. If you omit the custom property, it will also be set to an empty object.

const command = new Command({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'ping',
  data: {
    ttl: 10 * 1000
  },
  custom: {
    sourceIp: '127.0.0.1'
  }
});

In any case, the result is an object with an additional metadata property.

{
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'ping',
  id: '4784bce1-4b7b-45a0-87e4-3058303194e6',
  data: {
    ttl: 10000
  },
  custom: {
    sourceIp: '127.0.0.1'
  },
  user: null,
  metadata: {
    timestamp: 1421260133331,
    correlationId: '4784bce1-4b7b-45a0-87e4-3058303194e6',
    causationId: '4784bce1-4b7b-45a0-87e4-3058303194e6'
  }
}

Adding a token to a command

To add a JWT token to a command, e.g. to indicate which user caused it, call the addToken function and hand over the token.

const token = getJwt();
 
command.addToken(token);

Then you can access the user's id (which is identical to the sub claim) by using the command.user.id property. If you want to access the entire token use command.user.token.

Please note that until you provide a token, the command's user property will be null.

Handling deserialized commands

If you serialize and deserialize a command, all its data is kept, but its constructor and prototype are lost. To recreate them, use the wrap function.

const command = Command.wrap(deserializedCommand);

Using events

Creating events

If you need to create an event, call the Event constructor function and provide the appropriate parameters.

const event = new Event({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'pinged',
  metadata: {
    correlationId: '13505cab-0ca2-4502-b8c9-8f3ce63ae390',
    causationId: '124885f3-d35e-43a6-84eb-e28c70b5be66'
  }
});

If you want to attach data to the event, specify its data property. If you omit the data property, it will be set to an empty object.

const event = new Event({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'pinged',
  data: {
    ttl: 10 * 1000
  },
  metadata: {
    correlationId: '13505cab-0ca2-4502-b8c9-8f3ce63ae390',
    causationId: '124885f3-d35e-43a6-84eb-e28c70b5be66'
  }
});

By default, an event will always be a domain event. For other types of events, specify the event's type property.

const event = new Event({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'pingFailed',
  type: 'error',
  data: {
    ttl: 10 * 1000
  },
  metadata: {
    correlationId: '13505cab-0ca2-4502-b8c9-8f3ce63ae390',
    causationId: '124885f3-d35e-43a6-84eb-e28c70b5be66'
  }
});

If, additionally, you need to add metadata to the event, specify its custom property. If you omit the custom property, it will also be set to an empty object.

const event = new Event({
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'pinged',
  data: {
    ttl: 10 * 1000
  },
  custom: {
    sourceIp: '127.0.0.1'
  },
  metadata: {
    correlationId: '13505cab-0ca2-4502-b8c9-8f3ce63ae390',
    causationId: '124885f3-d35e-43a6-84eb-e28c70b5be66'
  }
});

In any case, the result is an object with the following structure.

{
  context: {
    name: 'network'
  },
  aggregate: {
    name: 'node',
    id: '85932442-bf87-472d-8b5a-b0eac3aa8be9'
  },
  name: 'pinged',
  type: 'domain',
  data: {
    ttl: 10000
  },
  metadata: {
    timestamp: 1421261012560,
    published: false,
    correlationId: '13505cab-0ca2-4502-b8c9-8f3ce63ae390',
    causationId: '124885f3-d35e-43a6-84eb-e28c70b5be66'
  }
}

Adding authorization metadata

You might want to add authorization metadata to an event in order to specify clearly who is allowed to read this event. Use the metadata.isAuthorized property and make sure to set the owner, forAuthenticated and forPublic properties.

const event = new Event({
  // ...
  metadata: {
    correlationId: '13505cab-0ca2-4502-b8c9-8f3ce63ae390',
    causationId: '124885f3-d35e-43a6-84eb-e28c70b5be66'
    isAuthorized: {
      owner: 'a7e2a714-17f0-45e4-9693-6e3a472cc3d9',
      forAuthenticated: true,
      forPublic: false
    }
  }
});

Adding a user to an event

To add a user to an event, e.g. to indicate which user caused it, call the addUser function and hand over the user. The user may be taken from a command, e.g. with command.user. It must contain an id.

event.addUser(command.user);

Then you can access the user's id by using the event.user.id property.

Please note that until you provide a user, the event's user property will be null.

Handling deserialized events

If you serialize and deserialize an event, all its data is kept, but its constructor and prototype are lost. To recreate them, use the wrap function.

const event = Event.wrap(deserializedEvent);

Manually creating commands and events

If, for whatever reason, you need to create a command or event manually, i.e. without the help of the constructor functions, you may use the Command.isWellformed and Event.isWellformed functions to verify whether the created object has the correct format.

const command = { /* ... */ },
      event = { /* ... */ };
 
console.log(Command.isWellformed(command)); // => true
console.log(Event.isWellformed(event));     // => true

Relations between commands and events

Each command and each event is identified by a unique id. It is automatically set whenever you create a new command or event, and it is accessible using the id property.

Since each event is caused by a command, you may want to find out by which command a given event was caused. You can do so using the event's metadata.causationId property which contains the causing command's id. The same is true for commands that were caused by an event, e.g. within a flow.

All commands and events that arise from an originating command additionally have a common id, the so-called metadata.correlationId. You can use this id to gather all commands and events that deal with a long-running transaction and belong together.

Running the build

To build this module use roboter.

$ npx roboter

License

Copyright (c) 2014-2018 the native web.

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU Affero General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU Affero General Public License along with this program. If not, see GNU Licenses.

install

npm i commands-events

Downloadsweekly downloads

59

version

1.0.3

license

AGPL-3.0

repository

githubgithub

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