Share your code. npm Orgs help your team discover, share, and reuse code. Create a free org »

cobble

2.0.2 • Public • Published

Cobble

Tiny composition lib for doing easy object mixins. The point of Cobble is to add minimal sugar to doing normal Object and Function composition. It is something like Traits, except that conflicts are overridden by default. Cobble works out to being fairly useful as the underpinnings for mixin systems for other object models, as it provides a robust and straightforward way to handle multiple conflicts when merging objects together.

If you are looking for a more complete object model wrapper try: Clank which uses cobble internally.

Changes in v2.0.0

  • remove provided() descriptor

Changes in v1.1.2

  • performance improvements

Changes in v1.1.0

  • the cobble and cobble.into functions no longer warn about missing properties. use the newly added cobble.assert, or cobble.isRequired methods to do finalizing checks
  • Internal calls to instanceof Descriptor have been replaces with a duck typing check (see isDescriptor) in order to allow interop between different included cobble packages.

API

Require the module;

var cobble = require('cobble')

cobble(...objects)

Compose a bunch of object literals into a single new object. cobble() does not mutate any of the arguments.

var first = { isCool: true }
  , second = { isAwesome: true }
  , result = cobble(first, second);

result.isCool && result.isAwesome // => true

note: you can pass in arrays of objects as well and cobble will flatten them appropriately: cobble([ first, second], third, [fourth, fifth]) saves needing to use apply() in most cases

cobble.into(target, ...objects)

Compose a bunch of object literals into a single new object. .into() mutates the first argument, useful for composing into an existing object, or a prototype.

var first = { isCool: true }
  , second = { isAwesome: true };

cobble.into(first, second)
first.hasOwnProperty('isAwesome') //=> true

note: you can pass in arrays of objects as well and cobble will flatten them appropriately: cobble.into([ first, second], third, [fourth, fifth]) saves needing to use apply() in most cases

cobble.assert(object)

Checks the passed in object for the existence of unmet required properties on the object. You can use this a check when an object is finalized. On failure it throws a TypeError with the property required which is an array of the missing properties.

Descriptors

Descriptors are function helpers for telling cobble how to handle conflicts between properties. By default, conflicting properties will be overridden by a later property in the chain

var mixinA = { greet: function(){ console.log('first one!') } }
  , mixinB = { greet: function(){ console.log('second one!') } }
  , result = cobble(mixinA, mixinB);

result.greet() //=> 'second one!'

we can adjust the behaviour by using a descriptor to hint at how cobble should compose the property. here we use the before descriptor to decorate the property.

var mixinA  = { greet: function(){ console.log('first one!') } }
  , result = cobble(
      mixinA, 
      {
        greet: cobble.before(function(){ 
            console.log('second one!') 
        })
      });

result.greet() //=> 'second one!' 
               //   'first one!'

Cobble will resolve conflicts in order, and keep track of conflict values so they can be resolved at once. This means that when composing a bunch of objects with conflicts you can provide one resolution strategy for all conflicting values in a chain, instead of each one individually

consider the following composition:

var mixinA = { greet: function(){ console.log('hi') } }
  , mixinB = { greet: function(){ console.log('hola') } }
  , mixinC = { greet: function(){ console.log('greetings!') } };

cobble(mixinA, mixinB, mixinC)

each mixin specifies a greet method that would conflict with the others if we compose them. Since cobble internally tracks each conflict we can use a single descriptor to compose each greet method

var chained = cobble(
    mixinA, 
    mixinB, 
    mixinC, 
    {
        greet: cobble.chain()
    })

chained.greet() // =>  'hi', 'hola', 'greetings'

Descriptors are passed in all previous values of a particular property at the time it is composed in the chain (in this case mixinA, B and C). Once a descriptor 'resolves' a set of values, they are considered resolved and any descriptors for the same key further down the chain will be passed in the composed value, and not the original values. for example if we changed the example to:

var chained = cobble(
    mixinA, 
    mixinB, 
    {
        greet: cobble.chain()
    },
    mixinC,
    {
        greet: cobble.before(function(){
            console.log("e'llo")    
        })
    })

is the same as:

var chained = cobble(
    mixinA, 
    mixinB, 
    {
        greet: cobble.chain()
    })

var befored = cobble(
    chained,    
    mixinC,
    {
        greet: cobble.before(function(){
            console.log("e'llo")    
        })
    });

Most descriptors can be called without any arguments and will be applied to any existing conflicts up the chain.

NOTE: cobble checks down the entire prototype chain not just "own" properties, this allows you to do super calls easily when composing objects with "inherited" properties, but can lead to unintended behaviour if you are not aware

Included Descriptors:

cobble.required - A special Descriptor that identifies a property as required. By default required properties do not warn, so you can use cobble.assert(obj) to check for the existence unmet requirements.

var result = cobble({ greeting: cobble.required });

cobble.assert(result) // TypeError: Unmet requirements: 'greetings'

result = cobble(result, { greeting: 'hello'})

cobble.assert(result) // no error

cobble.compose(method) - composes the provided method into the chain of values, where each function consumes the return value of the previous

var result = cobble(
    { 
      greeting: function(){ return 'hello' }
    },
    { greeting: cobble.compose(function(greeting){ 
        return greeting + ' and good day'
      })
  });

  result.greeting() //=> 'hello and good day' 

cobble.composeBefore(method) - exactly like .compose except the provided function is as the first function in the composition chain.

cobble.before(method) - wraps the provided method before the previous method(s) of the same property. The arguments passed to each method in the chain are the same, meaning it ignores return values

cobble.after(method) - wraps the provided method before the previous method(s) of the same property. The arguments passed to each method in the chain are the same, meaning it ignores return values

var mixinA  = { greet: function(){ console.log('hi') } }
  , result = cobble.compose(
      mixinA, 
      {
        greet: cobble.after(function(){ 
            console.log('john') 
        })
      });

  result.greet() //=> 'hi' 'john' 

cobble.around(method) - wraps the provided method around the previous method of the same property, passing in the previous method as the first argument

{
    key: cobble.around(function(prevMethod, argA, argB){
        console.log('do something before')
        prevMethod.call(this, argA, argB)
        console.log('do something after')
    })
}     

cobble.concat(array) - concats an array property with the previous one

cobble.from([object, [oldKey]]) - shallow borrow a property from another object, or key. If you provide BOTH an object and a key then the property key of obj is returned instead of a Descriptor.

var obj = { a: true, c: false, d: 'hi' }
  , result;

result = cobble(obj, {  b: cobble.from(obj, 'a') }) //this is equivalent to doing `{ b: obj.a }`

result.b // => true

result = cobble(obj, {  b: cobble.from('c') }) //b is set to c during composition

result.b // => false

result = cobble(obj, {  d: cobble.from(obj) })

result.d // => 'hi'

cobble.chain() - composes all functions in the chain into a single function that is called in order. Return values are ignored. This is an alias for before.

cobble.merge() - composes all functions in the chain into a single function that is called in order. Merge makes an attempt to merge the return values of each function into a single return value, merge assumes that return values will be objects and uses Object.assign to create a new unified return value.

cobble.Descriptor(fn) - Base Descriptor object, which you can create custom descriptors with. Descriptors are created by providing a function that is called at the time of composition, The value returned from the function will be the value set to the provided key. The previousValues parameter is an array of any and all possible values for that key up to the point when the descriptor is called.

var reduce = new cobble.Descriptor(function(key, previousValues){
    return previousValues.reduce(function(result, next){
        return result + next
      }, 0)
  })

var obj = cobble(
  { num: 1 },
  { num: 2 },
  { num: reduce } // at this point previous values will be [1, 2]
  { num: 4 }
  { num: reduce }) // now previous values will be [3, 4]

obj.num // => 7

cobble.isDescriptor(value) - duck type check for descriptors, use this instead of value instanceof cobble.Descriptor, which will fail for descriptors passed in from other cobble instances.

cobble.isRequired(value) - returns true if the value is a required property descriptor, use this instead of a val instanceof cobble.required, which will fail for descriptors passed in from other cobble instances.

install

npm i cobble

Downloadsweekly downloads

15

version

2.0.2

license

MIT

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

collaborators

  • avatar