asink

1.0.5 • Public • Published

asink

Like async/await, but asink/yield. A placeholder until async/await are standardized and included in node.js and web browsers. "asink" is exactly the same thing as "spawn", but with a slightly better name.

How To Use

Without asink, you might write an asynchronous function like this:

function myfunc () {
  return thingThatReturnsAPromise().then(() => {
    // do something else
    return aPromise1
  }).then(() => {
    // do yet another thing
    return aPromise2
  })
}

But with asink, you can write this code like this:

function myfunc () {
  return asink(function * () {
    yield thingThatReturnsAPromise()
    // do something else
    yield aPromise1
    // do yet another thing
    return aPromise2
  })
}

Code written with asink looks nicer and is easier to write and understand than without it. It is especially nice when there is a lot of logic with promises, or when there are errors that go inside try/catch blocks. It is almost the same as the async/await pattern of the upcoming version of javascript, ES7, but works today in node.js and (most modern) web browsers.

The same code written in the as-yet-unworking-and-unstandardized-es7 is:

async function myfunc () {
  await thingThatReturnsAPromise()
  // do something else
  await aPromise1
  // do yet another thing
  return aPromise2
}

asink lets you have most of the readability and writability gains in a form that works today without waiting for ES7. It is also maximally forwards-compatible in the sense that when async/await is actually available, a straightforward conversion of each asink function to the async/await pattern is possible by making each function async, removing the "return asink" line and corresponding closing brace and parenthesis, and making each yield an await.

Readme

Keywords

none

Package Sidebar

Install

npm i asink

Weekly Downloads

3

Version

1.0.5

License

BSD

Last publish

Collaborators

  • ryanxcharles