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    angular-state-machine

    1.0.1 • Public • Published

    AngularJS State Machine

    Forked from https://github.com/tafax/angular-state-machine by Matteo Tafani Alunno

    It is an AngularJS module to implement a Finite-State Machine. It can be useful in many situations where the state of an app(or module) follows specific paths. For example, it is very useful to implement a login module in a single page web application where the entire app depends on the login state and/or on the permissions of an user. It's very simple also handling multiple challenges login or changing the user permissions/routing according to user profile. The module provides features to manage those kind of situations with a simple configuration, offering an extensible and easy-maintainable way to work.

    Features

    • Create a state machine using a JSON-like configuration with a JS object.
    • Define transitions using dictionary syntax.
    • Define multiple predicates to choose which path the machine has to follow.
    • Perform an action for each state.
    • Change the configuration at any time to add new states or change the transitions.

    Installation

    You can download this by:

    After installation, import the module in your app.

    var app = angular.module('myApp', ['FSM']);

    Dependecies

    This module is dependency free.

    Configuration

    As a general consideration you need to inject the state machine provider in your app configuration.

    app.config(['stateMachineProvider', function(stateMachineProvider) {
        // Your code...
    }]);

    Very simple FSM

    We want to create a state machine to handle the user login in a single page application. Our states will be loggedIn or notLoggedIn. To perform a transition between the states we need to send a request and receive a 201 status code from the server that indicates a successful login.

    stateMachineProvider.config({
        init: { // This is the initial state(the not_logged_in one, but you have to call it 'init'). It is mandatory.
            transitions: {
                201: 'loggedIn'
            }
        },
        loggedIn: {
            // Right now the loggedIn state is empty.
        }
    });

    Afterwards, in the app run method we have to initialize the machine.

    myApp.run(['stateMachine', function(stateMachine) {
        stateMachine.initialize();
    }]);

    The machine is ready to receive messages. If the login was successful, a message 201 will be sent to the machine by invoking stateMachine.send('201');, so the machine now is in the loggedIn state.

    Adding error handling

    The previous machine is not so useful, but we can add some states to provide a more realistic usage of that configuration. Let's add a state to handle a login error that the server returns if the response code is 401.

    stateMachineProvider.config({
        init: { // This is the initial state(the not_logged_in one, but you have to call it 'init'). It is mandatory.
            transitions: {
                201: 'loggedIn',
                401: 'loginError'
            }
        },
        loggedIn: {
            // Right now the loggedIn state is empty.
        },
        loginError: {
            action: ['myErrorHandler', 'params', function(myErrorHandler, params) {
                myErrorHandler.handle(params.response.code, params.response.data);
            }]
        }
    });

    We added a new key called action that is executed when the machine arrives in the related state. The action is handled by the AngularJS injector so you can inject each service you want to use. In this case we injected a custom error handler to manage the error. We injected also params that is a special key to retrieve the parameters passed to the method send when it is invoked. So, by calling stateMachine.send('401', {response: response});, we will change the state to loginError and the machine will call the action in which the params will be available to be used.

    Predicates for the transitions

    In some cases when an error returns from the server for a given HTTP status code, the server provides an application code that the app could use to manage different kind of handling. In this case we can use an application code as a transition message instead of the status code or we can use the predicate feature.

    stateMachineProvider.config({
        init: { // This is the initial state(the not_logged_in one, but you have to call it 'init'). It is mandatory.
            transitions: {
                201: 'loggedIn',
                401: [{
                    to: 'loginError',
                    predicate: function(params) {
                        return params.data.appCode <= 4015;
                    }
                }, {
                   to: 'loginConfirmation',
                   predicate: function(params) {
                       return params.data.appCode == 4016;
                   }
                }]
            }
        },
        loggedIn: {
            // Right now the loggedIn state is empty.
        },
        loginConfirmation: {
            // Right now the loggedIn state is empty.
        },
        loginError: {
            action: ['myErrorHandler', 'params', function(myErrorHandler, params) {
                myErrorHandler.handle(params.response.code, params.response.data);
            }]
        }
    });

    In this case we added two transitions for a single message 401. Each one has a predicate that returns true or false depending of the application code that the server returned. If it is less than 4015 the machine goes to the loginError state, but if it is 4016 the machine goes to loginConfirmation so you can use the action to display, for example, a confirmation page to the user.

    More complex FSM

    The examples above are only some simplified cases that the module can handle or, better, you can manage using a state machine. Anyway, by mixing the features we saw above, you can implement more complex FSM to handle many different kind of cases.

    Contributing

    I love contributors :). If you think the module can be improved or you want to add a very cool feature, feel free to send a pull request at any time. Anyway, please respect the coding standard of the rest of code and remember to add the tests to cover your changes.

    License

    MIT

    Install

    npm i angular-state-machine

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    5

    Version

    1.0.1

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    78.4 kB

    Total Files

    18

    Last publish

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