adventure

quickly hack together a nodeschool adventure

adventure

quickly hack together a nodeschool adventure

This is an alternative to the workshopper module, which you should also look at.

workshopper is more convention-driven and fully-featured, but expects a particular (configurable) filesystem organization for problems.

adventure is entirely api-driven and has fewer configuration options.

tutorial

You can fork this tutorial from the example-adventure repo.

First make a runner.js. This is the file you can wire up to the package.json "bin" field.

#!/usr/bin/env node
 
var adventure = require('adventure');
var shop = adventure('example-adventure');
 
shop.add('dinosaurs', function () { return require('./dinosaurs') });
shop.add('robots', function () { return require('./robots') });
shop.add('wowsers', function () { return require('./wowsers') });
 
shop.execute(process.argv.slice(2));

You simply .add(name, fn) each of the adventures in your problem set and then .execute() the adventure with the command-line arguments.

The interface to problem files is very simple. The simplest version of a problem is just an object with a .problem string and .verify function.

Here's what we can put in dinosaurs/index.js:

exports.problem = 'Make a dinosaur sound.\n'
    + 'Use `$ADVENTURE_COMMAND verify YOUR_TEXT...` to make your sound.'
;
 
exports.verify = function (argscb) {
    if (/RAWR/.test(args)) {
        console.log('Wow that is a convincing dinosaur.\n');
        cb(true);
    }
    else if (/rawr/i.test(args)) {
        console.log('Close, but too quiet. Try louder.\n');
        cb(false);
    }
    else {
        console.log("That doesn't sound like a dinosaur at all.\n");
        cb(false);
    }
};

You don't need to put this in a file necessarily even, you just need to return an object with these properties from the function you pass to .add().

Your verify(args, cb) function will get the arguments passed to it on the command-line and a callback that you can use to indicate whether the solution was successful or not.

You can return many different kinds of objects in your .problem or .solution functions: a string, a buffer, a stream, or a function that returns a string, a buffer, or a stream.

Now in robots/index.js we can use streams for the problem and solution:

var fs = require('fs');
var path = require('path');
 
exports.problem = fs.createReadStream(__dirname + '/problem.txt');
exports.solution = fs.createReadStream(__dirname + '/solution.txt');
 
exports.verify = function (argscb) {
    var res = require(path.resolve(args[0]));
    if (/beep/.test(res) && /boop/.test(res)) {
        console.log('That sounds about right!\n');
        cb(true);
    }
    else if (/beep/.test(res) || /boop/.test(res)) {
        console.log('Hmm that sounds partly convincing but try harder.\n');
        cb(false);
    }
    else {
        console.log("That doesn't sound like a robot at all.\n");
        cb(false);
    }
};

Finally, we can use adventure-verify to verify solutions using tape with friendly colorized tap output.

In wowsers/index.js we can use adventure-verify to do:

var fs = require('fs');
var path = require('path');
var verify = require('adventure-verify');
 
exports.problem = fs.createReadStream(__dirname + '/problem.txt');
exports.solution = fs.createReadStream(__dirname + '/solution.txt');
 
exports.verify = verify({ modeReset: true }, function (argst) {
    var f = require(path.resolve(args[0]));
    t.equal(typeof f, 'function', 'you exported a function');
    t.equal(f(2,3), 6, '2 * 3 = 6');
    t.equal(f(1,1), 1, '1 * 1 = 1');
    t.equal(f(0.5,0.5), 0.25, '0.5 * 0.5 = 0.25');
    t.end();
});

Here we use modeReset so that when a user does console.log() or console.error() in their solution, their text shows up as the terminal default instead of getting mixed up with the TAP colors.

Now just fill in the problem.txt and solution.txt files and you will have a working nodeschool-style adventure! Yay!

methods

var adventure = require('adventure')

Create a new nodeschool workshop adventure.

options are:

  • opts.name - name of your adventure (required)

  • opts.command - the name of the adventure command (inferred from opts.name)

  • opts.title - title to use for your adventure (default: opts.name.toUpperCase())

  • opts.datadir - directory used to store the current level and the list of completed levels. default: '~/.config/' + opts.name

  • opts.colors - object mapping color types to [r,g,b] arrays

  • opts.colors.pass - show passing solution messages with this color

  • opts.colors.fail - show failing solution messages with this color

  • opts.colors.info - show extra info with this color

  • opts.fg - menu foreground color

  • opts.bg - menu background color

  • opts.autoclose - whether to close stdin automatically after the menu is shown

If opts is a string, it will be treated as the opts.name.

Your fn() should return a problem object in the format described below.

Run whatever commands are specified in the command-line args.

If you don't want to let .execute() show the menu, you can show the menu yourself explicitly with .showMenu().

The options are:

  • opts.fg - foreground color
  • opts.bg - background color
  • opts.title - menu title text
  • opts.autoclose - whether to close stdin automatically after the menu is shown

You can explicitly select a level with this method if you don't want to rely on the user to select a menu for themselves from the graphical menu.

problem object format

Problems must have a verify() function. All other fields are optional.

This function will be called when a user attempts to verify a problem with the verify command on the command-line.

You will get an array of the arguments given after the verify command in args.

You must call cb(ok) with ok, a boolean containing whether the solution was acceptible.

Check out adventure-verify for a higher-level way of verifying solutions with tape.

This function will be called when the user uses the run command from the command-line. You can implement this if you want to but it doesn't make sense for all problems.

This message will be displayed when a user selects the problem from the menu.

problem.problem can be a string, a buffer, a stream, or a function that returns a string, a buffer, or a stream.

This message will be displayed when a user successfully completes a problem, after the success notification.

problem.solution can be a string, a buffer, a stream, or a function that returns a string, a buffer, or a stream.

This message will be displayed when a user successfully completes a level. The default problem.pass is says YOUR SOLUTION IS CORRECT in a box of made of @s.

problem.pass can be a string, a buffer, a stream, or a function that returns a string, a buffer, or a stream.

This message will be displayed when a user's solution fails to pass all the tests. The default problem.fail is says YOUR SOLUTION IS NOT CORRECT in a box of made of #s.

problem.fail can be a string, a buffer, a stream, or a function that returns a string, a buffer, or a stream.

events

This event fires when a solution passed.

This event fires when a solution failed.

This event fires when all the levels are completed.

problem variables

These variables will be automatically replaced any time you use them in any of the problem messages, whether in a string, a buffer, a stream, or a function that returns a string, a buffer, or a stream.

  • $ADVENTURE_NAME - the name of the adventure
  • $ADVENTURE_COMMAND - the name of the adventure command

usage

The .execute(args) function accepts these commands:

$COMMAND
$COMMAND menu
 
  Show the menu.
 
$COMMAND verify [ARGS...]
 
  Verify the currently selected problem with ARGS.
 
$COMMAND run [ARGS...]
 
  Run the currently selected problem with ARGS.
  Not all problems support `run`.
 
$COMMAND solution
 
  Show the solution for the currently selected problem.
 
$COMMAND print
 
  Print the text of the currently selected level.
 
$COMMAND selected
 
  Print the name of the currently selected level.
 
$COMMAND select LEVEL
 
  Set the currently selected LEVEL.
 
$COMMAND list
 
  List the available levels.
 
$COMMAND completed
 
  List the completed levels.
 
$COMMAND reset
 
  Reset the list of completed levels.
 
$COMMAND help
 
  Show this message.
 

install

With npm do:

npm install adventure

license

MIT