@webqit/oohtml

    1.8.34 • Public • Published

    OOHTML

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    OOHTML offers a set of five features that make common UI development paradigms possible as native web platform features. These features may be used individually or together for some great UI-authoring capabilites. Here is an overview:

    HTML Modules

    HTML Modules are a templating feature that lets us write reusable HTML markup using the module, export and import paradigm. This feature establishes the standard <template> element as the foundation of a module infrastructure for HTML and introduces new attributes, properties and events that together closes the loop.

    A module is a regular <template> element with a name attribute - the module ID - and its contents are simply the exports.

    <head>
    
        <template name="module1">
    
            <label for="age">How old are you?</div>
            <input id="age" />
    
        </template>
    
    </head>

    Exports may be more properly wrapped within an <export> element of a designated name.

    <head>
    
        <template name="module1">
    
            <export name="question">
                <label for="age">How old are you?</label>
                <input id="age" />
            </export>
    
            <div>This is another export</div>
    
        </template>
    
    </head>

    Or they may be individually tagged to an export identifier using the exportgroup attribute.

    <head>
    
        <template name="module1">
    
            <label exportgroup="question" for="age">How old are you?</label>
            <input exportgroup="question" name="age" />
            
            <div>This is another export</div>
    
        </template>
    
    </head>

    Either way, they are accessed the same way using the Modules API.

    // Access module1 from document.templates
    let module1 = document.templates.module1;
    
    // Import module1's exports
    let questionExport = module1.exports.question; // Array
    
    // Clone the elements in the export
    let questionExportClone = questionExport.map(el => el.cloneNode(true));

    Taking things further, template elements may reference remote content using the src attribute.

    <head>
    
        <template name="module-remote" src="/bundle.html"></template>
    
    </head>

    The contents of the remote file automatically become the template's content on load.

    Details are in the HTML Modules specification. Learn more about the convention, API, events, and the polyfill support.

    HTML Imports

    HTML Imports are a declarative way to use the exports of an HTML Module from anywhere in the main document.

    Note that this is different from the HTML Imports that was spec'd with an early version of Web Components.

    Here, an <import> element in the <body> area is used to place a corresponing export of an HTML module.

    <body>
    
        <!-- Import question here from module1 -->
        <import name="question" template="module1"></import>
    
    </body>

    Resolution takes place and the <import> element is replaced by all of the imported contents.

    <body>
    
        <!-- import element replaced -->
        <label for="age">How old are you?</label>
        <input id="age" />
    
    </body>

    Also, multiple <import> elements within a block can be scoped to just one module ID declaration.

    <body>
    
        <!-- Point to a module; one module ID for all imports within -->
        <div template="module1">
    
            <!-- Import question here from module1 -->
            <import name="question"></import>
    
            <div>
                <!-- Import another export here from module1 -->
                <import name="export-2"></import>
            </div>
    
        </div>
    
    </body>

    On resolution, an <import> element will stand by somewhere with a view to returning to its slot on any event that gets the slot empty. In fact, <import> elements maintain a live relationship with the modules they point to and with the contents that go into their slot.

    So, if we dynamically changed the module ID declaration above to point to another module, imports will be resolved again, this time, from the new module.

    // Changing the module ID on the DIV container above will see all associated imports resolved again
    document.querySelector('div[template="module1"]').setAttribute('template', 'module2');

    This opens up new simple ways to create very dynamic applications.

    Details are in the HTML Imports specification. Learn more about the convention, dynamicity, Slot Inheritance, isomorphic rendering, and the polyfill support.

    Namespaced HTML

    Namespacing provides a way to let an element establish its own naming context for descendant elements. This makes it possible to keep IDs scoped to a context other than the document's global scope; thus the ability to write collision-free IDs across a page.

    The following modular markup implements its IDs in namespaces:

    <article id="continents" namespace>
        <section id="europe" namespace>
            <div id="about">About Europe</b></div>
            <div id="countries">Countries in Europe</div>
        </section>
        <section id="asia" namespace>
            <div id="about">About Asia</b></div>
            <div id="countries">Countries in Asia</div>
        </section>
    </article>

    The above gives us a conceptual model of repeating objects, each encapsulating its IDs:

    continents
     ├⏤europe
     │   ├⏤about
     │   ├⏤countries
     ├⏤asia
         ├⏤about
         ├⏤countries

    And beyond the point of giving us collision-free IDs, Namespaced HTML features an API that translates namespace models into real object trees:

    // Get the "continents" article
    let continents = document.namespace.continents;
    
    // Access scoped IDs with the new "namespace" DOM property
    let europe = continents.namespace.europe;
    let asia = continents.namespace.asia;
    
    // And for deeply-nested IDs...
    let aboutAsia = continents.namespace.asia.namespace.about;

    We get a document structure that translates to a bankable API for building great functionalities.

    Much of our code in the examples below will now use the namespace attribute in markup and the .namespace property in JavaScript.

    Details are in the Namespaced HTML specification. Learn more about the convention, Namespaced Selectors, API, observability, and the polyfill support.

    The State API

    The State API is a DOM API that lets us maintain application state at the document level and at individual element levels. It brings application state closer to the UI and makes it easy to keep the UI in sync with all the changes taking place.

    This API exposes a document-level state object on a document.state property, and an element-level state object on an element.state property. Arbitrary values can be set and retrieved on state objects the same way we would with regular objects.

    // At the document level
    document.state.pageTitle = 'Hello World!';
    console.log(document.state.pageTitle); // Hello World!
    
    // At the element level
    element.state.collapsed = true;
    console.log(element.state.collapsed); // true

    But state objects are unique in that they support observability. They are live objects that can be observed for changes using the Observer API.

    Observer.observe(document.state, 'pageTitle', e => {
        console.log('New Page Title: ' + e.value);
        // Or we could reflect this state on the document title element
        document.querySelector('title').innerHTML = e.value;
    });

    This lets us build very reactive applications natively.

    Using an element's state API, here's how we could make a collapsible component.

    <my-collapsible namespace>
        <div id="control">Toggle Me</div>
        <div id="content" style="height: 0px">
            Some content
        </div>
    </my-collapsible>
    customElements.define('my-collapsible', class extends HTMLElement {
    
        /**
         * Creates the Shadow DOM
         */
        constructor() {
            super();
            // Observe state and get the UI synced
            Observer.observe(this.state, 'collapsed', e => {
                this.namespace.content.style.height = e.value ? '0px' : 'auto';
                this.setAttribute('data-collapsed', e.value ? 'true' : 'false');
            });
    
            // Implement the logic for toggling collapsion
            this.namespace.control.addEventListener('click', function() {
                this.state.collapsed = !this.state.collapsed;
            });
        }
    
    });

    Other parts of the application are also able to access the state of this element.

    let collapsible = document.querySelector('my-collapsible');
    Observer.observe(collapsible.state, 'collapsed', e => {
        console.log(e.value ? 'element collapsed' : 'element expanded');
    });

    Details are in the State API specification. Learn more about the API, deep observability, and the polyfill support.

    Subscript

    Subscript is a type of JavaScript runtime that lets us create scoped, reactive <script> elements across an HTML document. That gives us a UI binding language and the ability to write UI logic without involving actual JavaScript classes or files.

    Subscript lets us write <script> elements that are scoped to their host elements instead of the global browser scope. Below is such a <script> element, being scoped to the #alert element - its host element:

    <div id="alert">
        <script type="subscript">
            console.log(this.id); // alert
        </script>
    </div>

    The this variable within Subscript is a reference to the script's host element. In addition, variables declared within the script are available only within the script, and global variables are always available across all scripts.

    <div id="alert" namespace>
    
        <div id="message"></div>
        <div id="exit" title="Close this message.">X</div>
    
        <script type="subscript">
            this.namespace.exit.addEventListener('click', () => {
                this.remove();
            });
        </script>
    
    </div>

    Below is how we could render something - a message - from the element's state object - .state.message.

    <body>
    
        <div id="alert" namespace>
    
            <div id="message"></div>
            <div id="exit" title="Close this message.">X</div>
    
            <script type="subscript">
                // Render the "message" property from the element's state object
    
                this.namespace.message.innerHTML = this.state.message;
                this.namespace.exit.addEventListener('click', () => {
                    this.remove();
                });
            </script>
    
        </div>
    
    <body>

    But the best part yet is Subscript's reactivity! While Subscript works like regular JavaScript, it is also able to observe changes in its scope and respond to them. And it does this at the granular statement level such that a given statement is evaluated again (independently of other statements in the script) whenever any of the observable references used in the statement experiences a change.

    Below, changing the observable reference.state.message will trigger that particular statement in the script above to run again.

    let alertElement = document.querySelector('#alert');
    alertElement.state.message = 'Task started!';
    setTimeout(() => {
        alertElement.state.message = 'Task complete!';
    }, 1000);

    Leveraging this reactivity, we could reimplement the <my-collapsible> component we created in the State API section above - this time, without a JavaScript class.

    <div id="collapsible" namespace>
        
        <div id="control">Toggle Me</div>
        <div id="content" style="height: 0px">
            Some content
        </div>
    
        <script type="subscript">
            // Observe state and get the UI synced, without requiring Observer.observe() here...
    
            this.setAttribute('data-collapsed', this.state.collapsed ? 'true' : 'false');
            this.namespace.content.style.height = this.state.collapsed ? '0px' : 'auto';
            this.namespace.control.addEventListener('click', () => {
                // Toggle collapsion state
                this.state.collapsed = !this.state.collapsed;
            });
        </script>
    
    </div>

    Details are in the Subscript specification. Learn more about the event-based runtime, deep observability, bindings, the API, error handling, and the polyfill support.

    Getting Started

    Go to project homepage.

    You definitely want to visit the documentation for each of OOHTML's features and try everything out by pasting the code examples and running them right in your browser. Simply include the OOHTML polyfill on your page and get away with writing modular, reusable, reactive HTML without a tool!

    We're putting together a collection of examples in the examples section.

    Issues

    To report bugs or request features, please submit an issue.

    License

    MIT.

    Install

    npm i @webqit/oohtml

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    17

    Version

    1.8.34

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    2 MB

    Total Files

    30

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • ox-harris