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    @panter/react-charts

    2.0.0-alpha.7 • Public • Published

    React Charts

    Simple, immersive & interactive charts for React

    Features

    • Line, Bar, Bubble, Area.
    • Hyper Responsive (container-based)
    • Powered by D3
    • Rendered by React
    • Flexible data model

    Demos

    Table of Contents

    Installation

    $ yarn add react-charts
    # or
    $ npm i react-charts --save

    Quick Example

    This will render a very basic line chart:

    import React from "react";
    import { Chart } from "react-charts";
    
    const lineChart = (
      <Chart
        data={[
          {
            label: "Series 1",
            data: [[0, 1], [1, 2], [2, 4], [3, 2], [4, 7]]
          },
          {
            label: "Series 2",
            data: [[0, 3], [1, 1], [2, 5], [3, 6], [4, 4]]
          }
        ]}
        axes={[
          { primary: true, type: "linear", position: "bottom" },
          { type: "linear", position: "left" }
        ]}
      />
    );

    Data Model

    React-Charts uses a common and very flexible data model based on arrays of series and arrays of datums. You can either use the model defaults directly, or use data accessors to materialize this structure.

    Typical visualization data can come in practically any shape and size. The following examples show data structures that are all reasonably equivalent at some level since they each contain an array of series[] and datums[]. They also show how to parse that data.

    In the following example, there is no need to use any accessors. The default accessors are able to easily understand this format:

    const data = [
      {
        label: "Series 1",
        data: [{ x: 1, y: 10 }, { x: 2, y: 10 }, { x: 3, y: 10 }]
      },
      {
        label: "Series 2",
        data: [{ x: 1, y: 10 }, { x: 2, y: 10 }, { x: 3, y: 10 }]
      },
      {
        label: "Series 3",
        data: [{ x: 1, y: 10 }, { x: 2, y: 10 }, { x: 3, y: 10 }]
      }
    ];
    
    <Chart data={data} />;

    In the following example, there is no need to use any accessors. The default accessors are able to easily understand this format, but please note that this format limits you from passing any meta data about your series and datums.

    const data = [
      [[1, 10], [2, 10], [3, 10]],
      [[1, 10], [2, 10], [3, 10]],
      [[1, 10], [2, 10], [3, 10]]
    ];
    <Chart data={data} />;

    Data Accessors

    When data isn't in a convenient format for React Charts, your first instinct will be to transform your data into the above formats. Don't do that! There is an easier way 🎉 We can use the Chart components' accessor props to point things in the right direction. Accessor props pass the original data and the series/datums you return down the line to form a new data model. See the <Chart> component for all available accessors.

    In the following example, the data is in a very funky format, but at it's core is the same as the previous examples.

    const data = {
      axis: [1, 2, 3],
      lines: [
        { data: [{ value: 10 }, { value: 10 }, { value: 10 }] },
        { data: [{ value: 10 }, { value: 10 }, { value: 10 }] },
        { data: [{ value: 10 }, { value: 10 }, { value: 10 }] }
      ]
    };
    
    <Chart
      // Pass the original data object
      data={data}
      // Use data.lines to represent the different series
      getSeries={data => data.lines}
      // Use data.lines[n].data to represent the different datums for each series
      getDatums={serie => serie.data}
      // Use the original data object and the datum index to reference the datum's primary value.
      getPrimary={(datum, i, series, seriesIndex, data) => data.axis[i]}
      // Use data.lines[n].data[n].value as each datums secondary value
      getSecondary={datum => datum.value}
    />;

    Series Labels

    Multiple series are often useless without labels. By default, React Charts looks for the label value on the series object you pass it. If not found, it will simply label your series as Series [n], where [n] is the zero-based index of the series, plus 1.

    If the default label accessor doesn't suit your needs, then you can use the <Chart> component's getLabel accessor prop:

    const data = [{
      specialLabel: 'Hello World!',
      data: [...]
    }]
    
    <Chart data={data} getLabel={series => series.specialLabel} />

    Axes & Scales

    React Charts supports an axes prop that handles both the underlying scale and visual rendering. These axes can be combined and configured to plot data in many ways. To date, we have the following scale types available:

    • Cartesian
      • linear - A continuous axis used for plotting numerical data on an evenly distributed scale. Works well both as a primary and secondary axis.
      • ordinal - A banded axis commonly used to plot categories or ordinal information. Works well as the primary axis for bar charts.
      • time - A continuous axis used for plotting localized times and dates on an evenly distributed scale. Works well as a primary axis.
      • utc - Similar to the time scale, but supports UTC datetimes instead of localized datetimes. Works well as a primary axis.
      • log - A continuous axis used for plotting numerical data on a logarithmically distributed scale. Works well as a secondary axis

    Keywords

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    Install

    npm i @panter/react-charts

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    1

    Version

    2.0.0-alpha.7

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    1.65 MB

    Total Files

    6

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • blurri
    • claudiocro
    • macrozone
    • remolueoend