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    @aws-cdk/aws-codepipeline-actions
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    1.162.0 • Public • Published

    AWS CodePipeline Actions


    cdk-constructs: Stable


    This package contains Actions that can be used in a CodePipeline.

    import * as codepipeline from '@aws-cdk/aws-codepipeline';
    import * as codepipeline_actions from '@aws-cdk/aws-codepipeline-actions';

    Sources

    AWS CodeCommit

    To use a CodeCommit Repository in a CodePipeline:

    const repo = new codecommit.Repository(this, 'Repo', {
      repositoryName: 'MyRepo',
    });
    
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline', {
      pipelineName: 'MyPipeline',
    });
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'CodeCommit',
      repository: repo,
      output: sourceOutput,
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Source',
      actions: [sourceAction],
    });

    If you want to use existing role which can be used by on commit event rule. You can specify the role object in eventRole property.

    const eventRole = iam.Role.fromRoleArn(this, 'Event-role', 'roleArn');
    declare const repo: codecommit.Repository;
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'CodeCommit',
      repository: repo,
      output: new codepipeline.Artifact(),
      eventRole,
    });

    If you want to clone the entire CodeCommit repository (only available for CodeBuild actions), you can set the codeBuildCloneOutput property to true:

    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    declare const repo: codecommit.Repository;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'CodeCommit',
      repository: repo,
      output: sourceOutput,
      codeBuildCloneOutput: true,
    });
    
    const buildAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput, // The build action must use the CodeCommitSourceAction output as input.
      outputs: [new codepipeline.Artifact()], // optional
    });

    The CodeCommit source action emits variables:

    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    declare const repo: codecommit.Repository;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'CodeCommit',
      repository: repo,
      output: sourceOutput,
      variablesNamespace: 'MyNamespace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        COMMIT_ID: {
          value: sourceAction.variables.commitId,
        },
      },
    });

    GitHub

    If you want to use a GitHub repository as the source, you must create:

    • A GitHub Access Token, with scopes repo and admin:repo_hook.
    • A Secrets Manager Secret with the value of the GitHub Access Token. Pick whatever name you want (for example my-github-token). This token can be stored either as Plaintext or as a Secret key/value. If you stored the token as Plaintext, set SecretValue.secretsManager('my-github-token') as the value of oauthToken. If you stored it as a Secret key/value, you must set SecretValue.secretsManager('my-github-token', { jsonField : 'my-github-token' }) as the value of oauthToken.

    To use GitHub as the source of a CodePipeline:

    // Read the secret from Secrets Manager
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.GitHubSourceAction({
      actionName: 'GitHub_Source',
      owner: 'awslabs',
      repo: 'aws-cdk',
      oauthToken: SecretValue.secretsManager('my-github-token'),
      output: sourceOutput,
      branch: 'develop', // default: 'master'
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Source',
      actions: [sourceAction],
    });

    The GitHub source action emits variables:

    declare const sourceOutput: codepipeline.Artifact;
    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.GitHubSourceAction({
      actionName: 'Github_Source',
      output: sourceOutput,
      owner: 'my-owner',
      repo: 'my-repo',
      oauthToken: SecretValue.secretsManager('my-github-token'),
      variablesNamespace: 'MyNamespace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        COMMIT_URL: {
          value: sourceAction.variables.commitUrl,
        },
      },
    });

    BitBucket

    CodePipeline can use a BitBucket Git repository as a source:

    Note: you have to manually connect CodePipeline through the AWS Console with your BitBucket account. This is a one-time operation for a given AWS account in a given region. The simplest way to do that is to either start creating a new CodePipeline, or edit an existing one, while being logged in to BitBucket. Choose BitBucket as the source, and grant CodePipeline permissions to your BitBucket account. Copy & paste the Connection ARN that you get in the console, or use the codestar-connections list-connections AWS CLI operation to find it. After that, you can safely abort creating or editing the pipeline - the connection has already been created.

    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeStarConnectionsSourceAction({
      actionName: 'BitBucket_Source',
      owner: 'aws',
      repo: 'aws-cdk',
      output: sourceOutput,
      connectionArn: 'arn:aws:codestar-connections:us-east-1:123456789012:connection/12345678-abcd-12ab-34cdef5678gh',
    });

    You can also use the CodeStarConnectionsSourceAction to connect to GitHub, in the same way (you just have to select GitHub as the source when creating the connection in the console).

    Similarly to GitHubSourceAction, CodeStarConnectionsSourceAction also emits the variables:

    declare const project: codebuild.Project;
    
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeStarConnectionsSourceAction({
      actionName: 'BitBucket_Source',
      owner: 'aws',
      repo: 'aws-cdk',
      output: sourceOutput,
      connectionArn: 'arn:aws:codestar-connections:us-east-1:123456789012:connection/12345678-abcd-12ab-34cdef5678gh',
      variablesNamespace: 'SomeSpace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        COMMIT_ID: {
          value: sourceAction.variables.commitId,
        },
      },
    });

    AWS S3 Source

    To use an S3 Bucket as a source in CodePipeline:

    const sourceBucket = new s3.Bucket(this, 'MyBucket', {
      versioned: true, // a Bucket used as a source in CodePipeline must be versioned
    });
    
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.S3SourceAction({
      actionName: 'S3Source',
      bucket: sourceBucket,
      bucketKey: 'path/to/file.zip',
      output: sourceOutput,
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Source',
      actions: [sourceAction],
    });

    The region of the action will be determined by the region the bucket itself is in. When using a newly created bucket, that region will be taken from the stack the bucket belongs to; for an imported bucket, you can specify the region explicitly:

    const sourceBucket = s3.Bucket.fromBucketAttributes(this, 'SourceBucket', {
      bucketName: 'my-bucket',
      region: 'ap-southeast-1',
    });

    By default, the Pipeline will poll the Bucket to detect changes. You can change that behavior to use CloudWatch Events by setting the trigger property to S3Trigger.EVENTS (it's S3Trigger.POLL by default). If you do that, make sure the source Bucket is part of an AWS CloudTrail Trail - otherwise, the CloudWatch Events will not be emitted, and your Pipeline will not react to changes in the Bucket. You can do it through the CDK:

    import * as cloudtrail from '@aws-cdk/aws-cloudtrail';
    
    declare const sourceBucket: s3.Bucket;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const key = 'some/key.zip';
    const trail = new cloudtrail.Trail(this, 'CloudTrail');
    trail.addS3EventSelector([{
      bucket: sourceBucket,
      objectPrefix: key,
    }], {
      readWriteType: cloudtrail.ReadWriteType.WRITE_ONLY,
    });
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.S3SourceAction({
      actionName: 'S3Source',
      bucketKey: key,
      bucket: sourceBucket,
      output: sourceOutput,
      trigger: codepipeline_actions.S3Trigger.EVENTS, // default: S3Trigger.POLL
    });

    The S3 source action emits variables:

    const key = 'some/key.zip';
    declare const sourceBucket: s3.Bucket;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.S3SourceAction({
      actionName: 'S3Source',
      bucketKey: key,
      bucket: sourceBucket,
      output: sourceOutput,
      variablesNamespace: 'MyNamespace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        VERSION_ID: {
          value: sourceAction.variables.versionId,
        },
      },
    });

    AWS ECR

    To use an ECR Repository as a source in a Pipeline:

    import * as ecr from '@aws-cdk/aws-ecr';
    
    declare const ecrRepository: ecr.Repository;
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.EcrSourceAction({
      actionName: 'ECR',
      repository: ecrRepository,
      imageTag: 'some-tag', // optional, default: 'latest'
      output: sourceOutput,
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Source',
      actions: [sourceAction],
    });

    The ECR source action emits variables:

    import * as ecr from '@aws-cdk/aws-ecr';
    
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    declare const ecrRepository: ecr.Repository;
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.EcrSourceAction({
      actionName: 'Source',
      output: sourceOutput,
      repository: ecrRepository,
      variablesNamespace: 'MyNamespace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        IMAGE_URI: {
          value: sourceAction.variables.imageUri,
        },
      },
    });

    Build & test

    AWS CodeBuild

    Example of a CodeBuild Project used in a Pipeline, alongside CodeCommit:

    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    const repository = new codecommit.Repository(this, 'MyRepository', {
      repositoryName: 'MyRepository',
    });
    const project = new codebuild.PipelineProject(this, 'MyProject');
    
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'CodeCommit',
      repository,
      output: sourceOutput,
    });
    const buildAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      outputs: [new codepipeline.Artifact()], // optional
      executeBatchBuild: true, // optional, defaults to false
      combineBatchBuildArtifacts: true, // optional, defaults to false
    });
    
    new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline', {
      stages: [
        {
          stageName: 'Source',
          actions: [sourceAction],
        },
        {
          stageName: 'Build',
          actions: [buildAction],
        },
      ],
    });

    The default category of the CodeBuild Action is Build; if you want a Test Action instead, override the type property:

    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const testAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'IntegrationTest',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      type: codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildActionType.TEST, // default is BUILD
    });

    Multiple inputs and outputs

    When you want to have multiple inputs and/or outputs for a Project used in a Pipeline, instead of using the secondarySources and secondaryArtifacts properties of the Project class, you need to use the extraInputs and outputs properties of the CodeBuild CodePipeline Actions. Example:

    declare const repository1: codecommit.Repository;
    const sourceOutput1 = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const sourceAction1 = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'Source1',
      repository: repository1,
      output: sourceOutput1,
    });
    declare const repository2: codecommit.Repository;
    const sourceOutput2 = new codepipeline.Artifact('source2');
    const sourceAction2 = new codepipeline_actions.CodeCommitSourceAction({
      actionName: 'Source2',
      repository: repository2,
      output: sourceOutput2,
    });
    
    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    const buildAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'Build',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput1,
      extraInputs: [
        sourceOutput2, // this is where 'source2' comes from
      ],
      outputs: [
        new codepipeline.Artifact('artifact1'), // for better buildspec readability - see below
        new codepipeline.Artifact('artifact2'),
      ],
    });

    Note: when a CodeBuild Action in a Pipeline has more than one output, it only uses the secondary-artifacts field of the buildspec, never the primary output specification directly under artifacts. Because of that, it pays to explicitly name all output artifacts of that Action, like we did above, so that you know what name to use in the buildspec.

    Example buildspec for the above project:

    const project = new codebuild.PipelineProject(this, 'MyProject', {
      buildSpec: codebuild.BuildSpec.fromObject({
        version: '0.2',
        phases: {
          build: {
            commands: [
              // By default, you're in a directory with the contents of the repository from sourceAction1.
              // Use the CODEBUILD_SRC_DIR_source2 environment variable
              // to get a path to the directory with the contents of the second input repository.
            ],
          },
        },
        artifacts: {
          'secondary-artifacts': {
            'artifact1': {
              // primary Action output artifact,
              // available as buildAction.outputArtifact
            },
            'artifact2': {
              // additional output artifact,
              // available as buildAction.additionalOutputArtifact('artifact2')
            },
          },
        },
      }),
      // ...
    });

    Variables

    The CodeBuild action emits variables. Unlike many other actions, the variables are not static, but dynamic, defined in the buildspec, in the 'exported-variables' subsection of the 'env' section. Example:

    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const buildAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'Build1',
      input: sourceOutput,
      project: new codebuild.PipelineProject(this, 'Project', {
        buildSpec: codebuild.BuildSpec.fromObject({
          version: '0.2',
          env: {
            'exported-variables': [
              'MY_VAR',
            ],
          },
          phases: {
            build: {
              commands: 'export MY_VAR="some value"',
            },
          },
        }),
      }),
      variablesNamespace: 'MyNamespace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        MyVar: {
          value: buildAction.variable('MY_VAR'),
        },
      },
    });

    Jenkins

    In order to use Jenkins Actions in the Pipeline, you first need to create a JenkinsProvider:

    const jenkinsProvider = new codepipeline_actions.JenkinsProvider(this, 'JenkinsProvider', {
      providerName: 'MyJenkinsProvider',
      serverUrl: 'http://my-jenkins.com:8080',
      version: '2', // optional, default: '1'
    });

    If you've registered a Jenkins provider in a different CDK app, or outside the CDK (in the CodePipeline AWS Console, for example), you can import it:

    const jenkinsProvider = codepipeline_actions.JenkinsProvider.fromJenkinsProviderAttributes(this, 'JenkinsProvider', {
      providerName: 'MyJenkinsProvider',
      serverUrl: 'http://my-jenkins.com:8080',
      version: '2', // optional, default: '1'
    });

    Note that a Jenkins provider (identified by the provider name-category(build/test)-version tuple) must always be registered in the given account, in the given AWS region, before it can be used in CodePipeline.

    With a JenkinsProvider, we can create a Jenkins Action:

    declare const jenkinsProvider: codepipeline_actions.JenkinsProvider;
    const buildAction = new codepipeline_actions.JenkinsAction({
      actionName: 'JenkinsBuild',
      jenkinsProvider: jenkinsProvider,
      projectName: 'MyProject',
      type: codepipeline_actions.JenkinsActionType.BUILD,
    });

    Deploy

    AWS CloudFormation

    This module contains Actions that allows you to deploy to CloudFormation from AWS CodePipeline.

    For example, the following code fragment defines a pipeline that automatically deploys a CloudFormation template directly from a CodeCommit repository, with a manual approval step in between to confirm the changes:

    example Pipeline to deploy CloudFormation

    See the AWS documentation for more details about using CloudFormation in CodePipeline.

    Actions for updating individual CloudFormation Stacks

    This package contains the following CloudFormation actions:

    • CloudFormationCreateUpdateStackAction - Deploy a CloudFormation template directly from the pipeline. The indicated stack is created, or updated if it already exists. If the stack is in a failure state, deployment will fail (unless replaceOnFailure is set to true, in which case it will be destroyed and recreated).
    • CloudFormationDeleteStackAction - Delete the stack with the given name.
    • CloudFormationCreateReplaceChangeSetAction - Prepare a change set to be applied later. You will typically use change sets if you want to manually verify the changes that are being staged, or if you want to separate the people (or system) preparing the changes from the people (or system) applying the changes.
    • CloudFormationExecuteChangeSetAction - Execute a change set prepared previously.

    Actions for deploying CloudFormation StackSets to multiple accounts

    You can use CloudFormation StackSets to deploy the same CloudFormation template to multiple accounts in a managed way. If you use AWS Organizations, StackSets can be deployed to all accounts in a particular Organizational Unit (OU), and even automatically to new accounts as soon as they are added to a particular OU. For more information, see the Working with StackSets section of the CloudFormation developer guide.

    The actions available for updating StackSets are:

    • CloudFormationDeployStackSetAction - Create or update a CloudFormation StackSet directly from the pipeline, optionally immediately create and update Stack Instances as well.
    • CloudFormationDeployStackInstancesAction - Update outdated Stack Instaces using the current version of the StackSet.

    Here's an example of using both of these actions:

    declare const pipeline: codepipeline.Pipeline;
    declare const sourceOutput: codepipeline.Artifact;
    
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'DeployStackSets',
      actions: [
        // First, update the StackSet itself with the newest template
        new codepipeline_actions.CloudFormationDeployStackSetAction({
          actionName: 'UpdateStackSet',
          runOrder: 1,
          stackSetName: 'MyStackSet',
          template: codepipeline_actions.StackSetTemplate.fromArtifactPath(sourceOutput.atPath('template.yaml')),
    
          // Change this to 'StackSetDeploymentModel.organizations()' if you want to deploy to OUs
          deploymentModel: codepipeline_actions.StackSetDeploymentModel.selfManaged(),
          // This deploys to a set of accounts
          stackInstances: codepipeline_actions.StackInstances.inAccounts(['111111111111'], ['us-east-1', 'eu-west-1']),
        }),
    
        // Afterwards, update/create additional instances in other accounts
        new codepipeline_actions.CloudFormationDeployStackInstancesAction({
          actionName: 'AddMoreInstances',
          runOrder: 2,
          stackSetName: 'MyStackSet',
          stackInstances: codepipeline_actions.StackInstances.inAccounts(
            ['222222222222', '333333333333'],
            ['us-east-1', 'eu-west-1']
          ),
        }),
      ],
    });

    Lambda deployed through CodePipeline

    If you want to deploy your Lambda through CodePipeline, and you don't use assets (for example, because your CDK code and Lambda code are separate), you can use a special Lambda Code class, CfnParametersCode. Note that your Lambda must be in a different Stack than your Pipeline. The Lambda itself will be deployed, alongside the entire Stack it belongs to, using a CloudFormation CodePipeline Action. Example:

    Example of deploying a Lambda through CodePipeline

    Cross-account actions

    If you want to update stacks in a different account, pass the account property when creating the action:

    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    new codepipeline_actions.CloudFormationCreateUpdateStackAction({
      actionName: 'CloudFormationCreateUpdate',
      stackName: 'MyStackName',
      adminPermissions: true,
      templatePath: sourceOutput.atPath('template.yaml'),
      account: '123456789012',
    });

    This will create a new stack, called <PipelineStackName>-support-123456789012, in your App, that will contain the role that the pipeline will assume in account 123456789012 before executing this action. This support stack will automatically be deployed before the stack containing the pipeline.

    You can also pass a role explicitly when creating the action - in that case, the account property is ignored, and the action will operate in the same account the role belongs to:

    import { PhysicalName } from '@aws-cdk/core';
    
    // in stack for account 123456789012...
    declare const otherAccountStack: Stack;
    const actionRole = new iam.Role(otherAccountStack, 'ActionRole', {
      assumedBy: new iam.AccountPrincipal('123456789012'),
      // the role has to have a physical name set
      roleName: PhysicalName.GENERATE_IF_NEEDED,
    });
    
    // in the pipeline stack...
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    new codepipeline_actions.CloudFormationCreateUpdateStackAction({
      actionName: 'CloudFormationCreateUpdate',
      stackName: 'MyStackName',
      adminPermissions: true,
      templatePath: sourceOutput.atPath('template.yaml'),
      role: actionRole, // this action will be cross-account as well
    });

    AWS CodeDeploy

    Server deployments

    To use CodeDeploy for EC2/on-premise deployments in a Pipeline:

    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline', {
      pipelineName: 'MyPipeline',
    });
    
    // add the source and build Stages to the Pipeline...
    const buildOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    declare const deploymentGroup: codedeploy.ServerDeploymentGroup;
    const deployAction = new codepipeline_actions.CodeDeployServerDeployAction({
      actionName: 'CodeDeploy',
      input: buildOutput,
      deploymentGroup,
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Deploy',
      actions: [deployAction],
    });
    Lambda deployments

    To use CodeDeploy for blue-green Lambda deployments in a Pipeline:

    const lambdaCode = lambda.Code.fromCfnParameters();
    const func = new lambda.Function(this, 'Lambda', {
      code: lambdaCode,
      handler: 'index.handler',
      runtime: lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_12_X,
    });
    // used to make sure each CDK synthesis produces a different Version
    const version = func.currentVersion;
    const alias = new lambda.Alias(this, 'LambdaAlias', {
      aliasName: 'Prod',
      version,
    });
    
    new codedeploy.LambdaDeploymentGroup(this, 'DeploymentGroup', {
      alias,
      deploymentConfig: codedeploy.LambdaDeploymentConfig.LINEAR_10PERCENT_EVERY_1MINUTE,
    });

    Then, you need to create your Pipeline Stack, where you will define your Pipeline, and deploy the lambdaStack using a CloudFormation CodePipeline Action (see above for a complete example).

    ECS

    CodePipeline can deploy an ECS service. The deploy Action receives one input Artifact which contains the image definition file:

    import * as ecs from '@aws-cdk/aws-ecs';
    
    declare const service: ecs.FargateService;
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const buildOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const deployStage = pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Deploy',
      actions: [
        new codepipeline_actions.EcsDeployAction({
          actionName: 'DeployAction',
          service,
          // if your file is called imagedefinitions.json,
          // use the `input` property,
          // and leave out the `imageFile` property
          input: buildOutput,
          // if your file name is _not_ imagedefinitions.json,
          // use the `imageFile` property,
          // and leave out the `input` property
          imageFile: buildOutput.atPath('imageDef.json'),
          deploymentTimeout: Duration.minutes(60), // optional, default is 60 minutes
        }),
      ],
    });

    Deploying ECS applications to existing services

    CodePipeline can deploy to an existing ECS service which uses the ECS service ARN format that contains the Cluster name. This also works if the service is in a different account and/or region than the pipeline:

    import * as ecs from '@aws-cdk/aws-ecs';
    
    const service = ecs.BaseService.fromServiceArnWithCluster(this, 'EcsService',
      'arn:aws:ecs:us-east-1:123456789012:service/myClusterName/myServiceName'
    );
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const buildOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    // add source and build stages to the pipeline as usual...
    const deployStage = pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Deploy',
      actions: [
        new codepipeline_actions.EcsDeployAction({
          actionName: 'DeployAction',
          service: service,
          input: buildOutput,
        }),
      ],
    });

    When deploying across accounts, especially in a CDK Pipelines self-mutating pipeline, it is recommended to provide the role property to the EcsDeployAction. The Role will need to have permissions assigned to it for ECS deployment. See the CodePipeline documentation for the permissions needed.

    Deploying ECS applications stored in a separate source code repository

    The idiomatic CDK way of deploying an ECS application is to have your Dockerfiles and your CDK code in the same source code repository, leveraging Docker Assets, and use the CDK Pipelines module.

    However, if you want to deploy a Docker application whose source code is kept in a separate version control repository than the CDK code, you can use the TagParameterContainerImage class from the ECS module. Here's an example:

    example ECS pipeline for an application in a separate source code repository

    AWS S3 Deployment

    To use an S3 Bucket as a deployment target in CodePipeline:

    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const targetBucket = new s3.Bucket(this, 'MyBucket');
    
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const deployAction = new codepipeline_actions.S3DeployAction({
      actionName: 'S3Deploy',
      bucket: targetBucket,
      input: sourceOutput,
    });
    const deployStage = pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Deploy',
      actions: [deployAction],
    });

    Invalidating the CloudFront cache when deploying to S3

    There is currently no native support in CodePipeline for invalidating a CloudFront cache after deployment. One workaround is to add another build step after the deploy step, and use the AWS CLI to invalidate the cache:

    // Create a Cloudfront Web Distribution
    import * as cloudfront from '@aws-cdk/aws-cloudfront';
    declare const distribution: cloudfront.Distribution;
    
    // Create the build project that will invalidate the cache
    const invalidateBuildProject = new codebuild.PipelineProject(this, `InvalidateProject`, {
      buildSpec: codebuild.BuildSpec.fromObject({
        version: '0.2',
        phases: {
          build: {
            commands:[
              'aws cloudfront create-invalidation --distribution-id ${CLOUDFRONT_ID} --paths "/*"',
              // Choose whatever files or paths you'd like, or all files as specified here
            ],
          },
        },
      }),
      environmentVariables: {
        CLOUDFRONT_ID: { value: distribution.distributionId },
      },
    });
    
    // Add Cloudfront invalidation permissions to the project
    const distributionArn = `arn:aws:cloudfront::${this.account}:distribution/${distribution.distributionId}`;
    invalidateBuildProject.addToRolePolicy(new iam.PolicyStatement({
      resources: [distributionArn],
      actions: [
        'cloudfront:CreateInvalidation',
      ],
    }));
    
    // Create the pipeline (here only the S3 deploy and Invalidate cache build)
    const deployBucket = new s3.Bucket(this, 'DeployBucket');
    const deployInput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'Pipeline', {
      stages: [
        // ...
        {
          stageName: 'Deploy',
          actions: [
            new codepipeline_actions.S3DeployAction({
              actionName: 'S3Deploy',
              bucket: deployBucket,
              input: deployInput,
              runOrder: 1,
            }),
            new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
              actionName: 'InvalidateCache',
              project: invalidateBuildProject,
              input: deployInput,
              runOrder: 2,
            }),
          ],
        },
      ],
    });

    Alexa Skill

    You can deploy to Alexa using CodePipeline with the following Action:

    // Read the secrets from ParameterStore
    const clientId = SecretValue.secretsManager('AlexaClientId');
    const clientSecret = SecretValue.secretsManager('AlexaClientSecret');
    const refreshToken = SecretValue.secretsManager('AlexaRefreshToken');
    
    // Add deploy action
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    new codepipeline_actions.AlexaSkillDeployAction({
      actionName: 'DeploySkill',
      runOrder: 1,
      input: sourceOutput,
      clientId: clientId.toString(),
      clientSecret: clientSecret,
      refreshToken: refreshToken,
      skillId: 'amzn1.ask.skill.12345678-1234-1234-1234-123456789012',
    });

    If you need manifest overrides you can specify them as parameterOverridesArtifact in the action:

    // Deploy some CFN change set and store output
    const executeOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact('CloudFormation');
    const executeChangeSetAction = new codepipeline_actions.CloudFormationExecuteChangeSetAction({
      actionName: 'ExecuteChangesTest',
      runOrder: 2,
      stackName: 'MyStack',
      changeSetName: 'MyChangeSet',
      outputFileName: 'overrides.json',
      output: executeOutput,
    });
    
    // Provide CFN output as manifest overrides
    const clientId = SecretValue.secretsManager('AlexaClientId');
    const clientSecret = SecretValue.secretsManager('AlexaClientSecret');
    const refreshToken = SecretValue.secretsManager('AlexaRefreshToken');
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    new codepipeline_actions.AlexaSkillDeployAction({
      actionName: 'DeploySkill',
      runOrder: 1,
      input: sourceOutput,
      parameterOverridesArtifact: executeOutput,
      clientId: clientId.toString(),
      clientSecret: clientSecret,
      refreshToken: refreshToken,
      skillId: 'amzn1.ask.skill.12345678-1234-1234-1234-123456789012',
    });

    AWS Service Catalog

    You can deploy a CloudFormation template to an existing Service Catalog product with the following Action:

    const cdkBuildOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const serviceCatalogDeployAction = new codepipeline_actions.ServiceCatalogDeployActionBeta1({
      actionName: 'ServiceCatalogDeploy',
      templatePath: cdkBuildOutput.atPath("Sample.template.json"),
      productVersionName: "Version - " + Date.now.toString,
      productVersionDescription: "This is a version from the pipeline with a new description.",
      productId: "prod-XXXXXXXX",
    });

    Approve & invoke

    Manual approval Action

    This package contains an Action that stops the Pipeline until someone manually clicks the approve button:

    import * as sns from '@aws-cdk/aws-sns';
    
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const approveStage = pipeline.addStage({ stageName: 'Approve' });
    const manualApprovalAction = new codepipeline_actions.ManualApprovalAction({
      actionName: 'Approve',
      notificationTopic: new sns.Topic(this, 'Topic'), // optional
      notifyEmails: [
        'some_email@example.com',
      ], // optional
      additionalInformation: 'additional info', // optional
    });
    approveStage.addAction(manualApprovalAction);
    // `manualApprovalAction.notificationTopic` can be used to access the Topic
    // after the Action has been added to a Pipeline

    If the notificationTopic has not been provided, but notifyEmails were, a new SNS Topic will be created (and accessible through the notificationTopic property of the Action).

    If you want to grant a principal permissions to approve the changes, you can invoke the method grantManualApproval passing it a IGrantable:

    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const approveStage = pipeline.addStage({ stageName: 'Approve' });
    const manualApprovalAction = new codepipeline_actions.ManualApprovalAction({
      actionName: 'Approve',
    });
    approveStage.addAction(manualApprovalAction);
    
    const role = iam.Role.fromRoleArn(this, 'Admin', Arn.format({ service: 'iam', resource: 'role', resourceName: 'Admin' }, this));
    manualApprovalAction.grantManualApproval(role);

    AWS Lambda

    This module contains an Action that allows you to invoke a Lambda function in a Pipeline:

    declare const fn: lambda.Function;
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const lambdaAction = new codepipeline_actions.LambdaInvokeAction({
      actionName: 'Lambda',
      lambda: fn,
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'Lambda',
      actions: [lambdaAction],
    });

    The Lambda Action can have up to 5 inputs, and up to 5 outputs:

    declare const fn: lambda.Function;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const buildOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const lambdaAction = new codepipeline_actions.LambdaInvokeAction({
      actionName: 'Lambda',
      inputs: [
        sourceOutput,
        buildOutput,
      ],
      outputs: [
        new codepipeline.Artifact('Out1'),
        new codepipeline.Artifact('Out2'),
      ],
      lambda: fn,
    });

    The Lambda Action supports custom user parameters that pipeline will pass to the Lambda function:

    declare const fn: lambda.Function;
    
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const lambdaAction = new codepipeline_actions.LambdaInvokeAction({
      actionName: 'Lambda',
      lambda: fn,
      userParameters: {
        foo: 'bar',
        baz: 'qux',
      },
      // OR
      userParametersString: 'my-parameter-string',
    });

    The Lambda invoke action emits variables. Unlike many other actions, the variables are not static, but dynamic, defined by the function calling the PutJobSuccessResult API with the outputVariables property filled with the map of variables Example:

    const lambdaInvokeAction = new codepipeline_actions.LambdaInvokeAction({
      actionName: 'Lambda',
      lambda: new lambda.Function(this, 'Func', {
        runtime: lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_12_X,
        handler: 'index.handler',
        code: lambda.Code.fromInline(`
            const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
    
            exports.handler = async function(event, context) {
                const codepipeline = new AWS.CodePipeline();
                await codepipeline.putJobSuccessResult({
                    jobId: event['CodePipeline.job'].id,
                    outputVariables: {
                        MY_VAR: "some value",
                    },
                }).promise();
            }
        `),
      }),
      variablesNamespace: 'MyNamespace', // optional - by default, a name will be generated for you
    });
    
    // later:
    declare const project: codebuild.PipelineProject;
    const sourceOutput = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    new codepipeline_actions.CodeBuildAction({
      actionName: 'CodeBuild',
      project,
      input: sourceOutput,
      environmentVariables: {
        MyVar: {
          value: lambdaInvokeAction.variable('MY_VAR'),
        },
      },
    });

    See the AWS documentation on how to write a Lambda function invoked from CodePipeline.

    AWS Step Functions

    This module contains an Action that allows you to invoke a Step Function in a Pipeline:

    import * as stepfunctions from '@aws-cdk/aws-stepfunctions';
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const startState = new stepfunctions.Pass(this, 'StartState');
    const simpleStateMachine  = new stepfunctions.StateMachine(this, 'SimpleStateMachine', {
      definition: startState,
    });
    const stepFunctionAction = new codepipeline_actions.StepFunctionInvokeAction({
      actionName: 'Invoke',
      stateMachine: simpleStateMachine,
      stateMachineInput: codepipeline_actions.StateMachineInput.literal({ IsHelloWorldExample: true }),
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'StepFunctions',
      actions: [stepFunctionAction],
    });

    The StateMachineInput can be created with one of 2 static factory methods: literal, which takes an arbitrary map as its only argument, or filePath:

    import * as stepfunctions from '@aws-cdk/aws-stepfunctions';
    
    const pipeline = new codepipeline.Pipeline(this, 'MyPipeline');
    const inputArtifact = new codepipeline.Artifact();
    const startState = new stepfunctions.Pass(this, 'StartState');
    const simpleStateMachine  = new stepfunctions.StateMachine(this, 'SimpleStateMachine', {
      definition: startState,
    });
    const stepFunctionAction = new codepipeline_actions.StepFunctionInvokeAction({
      actionName: 'Invoke',
      stateMachine: simpleStateMachine,
      stateMachineInput: codepipeline_actions.StateMachineInput.filePath(inputArtifact.atPath('assets/input.json')),
    });
    pipeline.addStage({
      stageName: 'StepFunctions',
      actions: [stepFunctionAction],
    });

    See the AWS documentation for information on Action structure reference.

    Install

    npm i @aws-cdk/aws-codepipeline-actions

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