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    @angular-architects/module-federation
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    15.0.2 • Public • Published

    @angular-architects/module-federation

    Seamlessly using Webpack Module Federation with the Angular CLI.

    Thanks

    Big thanks to the following people who helped to make this possible:

    Prequisites

    • Angular CLI 12 or higher (13, 14, 15)

    Motivation 💥

    Module Federation allows loading separately compiled and deployed code (like micro frontends or plugins) into an application. This plugin makes Module Federation work together with Angular and the CLI.

    Features 🔥

    Generates the skeleton for a Module Federation config.

    Installs a custom builder to enable Module Federation.

    Assigning a new port to serve (ng serve) several projects at once.

    The module federation config is a partial webpack configuration. It only contains stuff to control module federation. The rest is generated by the CLI as usual.

    Since Version 1.2, we also provide some advanced features like:

    Dynamic Module Federation support

    Sharing Libs of a Monorepo

    Which Version to use?

    • Angular 12: @angular-architects/module-federation: ^12.0.0
    • Angular 13: @angular-architects/module-federation: ~14.2.0
    • Angular 14: @angular-architects/module-federation: ^14.3.0
    • Angular 15: @angular-architects/module-federation: ^15.0.0

    Beginning with Angular 13, we had to add some changes to adjust to the Angular CLI. Please see the next section for this.

    Update

    This library supports ng update:

    ng update @angular-architects/module-federation
    

    If you update by hand (e. g. via npm install), make sure you also install a respective version of ngx-build-plus (version 15 for Angular 15, version 14 for Angular 14, version 13 for Angular 13, etc.)

    Upgrade from Angular 12 or lower

    Beginning with Angular 13, the CLI generates EcmaScript modules instead of script files. This affects how we work with Module Federation a bit.

    Please find information on migrating here:

    Migration Guide for Angular 13+

    If you start from the scratch, ng add will take care of these settings.

    Usage 🛠️

    Angular CLI

    1. ng add @angular-architects/module-federation
    2. Adjust the generated webpack.config.js file
    3. Repeat this for further projects in your workspace (if needed)

    Nx

    1. npm install --save-dev @angular-architects/module-federation
    2. nx g @angular-architects/module-federation:init
    3. Adjust the generated webpack.config.js file
    4. Repeat this for further projects in your workspace (if needed)

    🆕🔥 Version 14+: Use the --type switch to get the new streamlined configuration

    With version 14, we've introduced a --type switch for ng add and the init schematic. Set it to one of the following values to get a more streamlined configuration file:

    • host
    • dynamic-host
    • remote

    A dynamic host reads the micro frontend's URLs from a configuration file at runtime.

    Getting Started 🧪

    Please find here a tutorial that shows how to use this plugin.

    Microfrontend Loaded into Shell

    >> Start Tutorial

    Documentation 📰

    Please have a look at this article series about Module Federation.

    Example 📽️

    This example loads a microfrontend into a shell:

    Please have a look into the example's readme. It points you to the important aspects of using Module Federation.

    Advanced Features

    While the above-mentioned tutorial and blog articles guide you through using Module Federation, this section draws your attention to some advanced aspects of this plugin and Module Federation in general.

    Dynamic Module Federation

    Since version 1.2, we provide helper functions making dynamic module federation really easy. Just use our loadRemoteModule function instead of a dynamic include, e. g. together with lazy routes:

    import { loadRemoteModule } from '@angular-architects/module-federation';
    
    [...]
    const routes: Routes = [
        [...]
        {
            path: 'flights',
            loadChildren: () =>
                loadRemoteModule({
                    type: 'module',
                    remoteEntry: 'http://localhost:3000/remoteEntry.js',
                    exposedModule: './Module'
                })
                .then(m => m.FlightsModule)
        },
        [...]
    ]

    If somehow possible, load the remoteEntry upfront. This allows Module Federation to take the remote's metadata in consideration when negotiating the versions of the shared libraries.

    For this, you could call loadRemoteEntry BEFORE bootstrapping Angular:

    // main.ts
    import { loadRemoteEntry } from '@angular-architects/module-federation';
    
    Promise.all([
      loadRemoteEntry({
        type: 'module',
        remoteEntry: 'http://localhost:3000/remoteEntry.js',
      }),
    ])
      .catch((err) => console.error('Error loading remote entries', err))
      .then(() => import('./bootstrap'))
      .catch((err) => console.error(err));

    The bootstrap.ts file contains the source code normally found in main.ts and hence, it calls platform.bootstrapModule(AppModule). You really need this combination of an upfront file calling loadRemoteEntry and a dynamic import loading another file bootstrapping Angular because Angular itself is already a shared library respected during the version negotiation.

    Then, when loading the remote Module, you set to mention the remoteEntry property anyway, as it also acts as an internal identifier for the remote:

    import { loadRemoteModule } from '@angular-architects/module-federation';
    
    [...]
    const routes: Routes = [
        [...]
        {
            path: 'flights',
            loadChildren: () =>
                loadRemoteModule({
                    type: 'module',
                    remoteEntry: 'http://localhost:3000/remoteEntry.js',
                    exposedModule: './Module'
                })
                .then(m => m.FlightsModule)
        },
        [...]
    ]

    Sharing Libs of a Monorepo

    Let's assume, you have an Angular CLI Monorepo or an Nx Monorepo using path mappings in tsconfig.json for providing libraries:

    "shared-lib": [
      "projects/shared-lib/src/public-api.ts",
    ],

    You can now share such a library across all your micro frontends (apps) in your mono repo. This means, this library will be only loaded once.

    New streamlined configuration in version 14+

    Beginning with version 14, we use a more steamlined configuration, when using the above mentioned --type switch with one of the following options: remote, host, dynamic-host.

    This new configuration automatically shares all local libararies. Hence, you don't need to do a thing.

    However, if you want to control, which local libraries to share, you can use the the sharedMappings array:

    module.exports = withModuleFederationPlugin({
      shared: {
        ...shareAll({
          singleton: true,
          strictVersion: true,
          requiredVersion: 'auto',
        }),
      },
    
      sharedMappings: ['shared-lib'],
    });

    Please don't forget that sharing in Module Federation is always an opt-in: You need to add this setting to each micro frontend that should share it.

    Legacy-Syntax and version 12-13

    In previous versions, you registered the lib name with the SharedMappings instance in your webpack config:

    const mf = require("@angular-architects/module-federation/webpack");
    const path = require("path");
    
    [...]
    
    const sharedMappings = new mf.SharedMappings();
    sharedMappings.register(
      path.join(__dirname, '../../tsconfig.json'),
      ['auth-lib']
    );

    Beginning with version 1.2, the boilerplate for using SharedMappings is generated for you. You only need to add your lib's name here.

    This generated code includes providing metadata for these libraries for the ModuleFederationPlugin and adding a plugin making sure that even source code generated by the Angular Compiler uses the shared version of the library.

    plugins: [
        new ModuleFederationPlugin({
            [...]
            shared: {
                [...]
                ...sharedMappings.getDescriptors()
            }
        }),
        sharedMappings.getPlugin(),
    ],

    Share Helper

    The helper function share adds some additional options for the shared dependencies:

    shared: share({
        "@angular/common": {
            singleton: true,
            strictVersion: true,
            requiredVersion: 'auto',
            includeSecondaries: true
        },
        [...]
    })

    The added options are requireVersion: 'auto' and includeSecondaries.

    requireVersion: 'auto'

    If you set requireVersion to 'auto', the helper takes the version defined in your package.json.

    This helps to solve issues with not (fully) met peer dependencies and secondary entry points (see Pitfalls section below).

    By default, it takes the package.json that is closest to the caller (normally the webpack.config.js). However, you can pass the path to an other package.json using the second optional parameter. Also, you need to define the shared libray within the node dependencies in your package.json.

    Instead of setting requireVersion to auto time and again, you can also skip this option and call setInferVersion(true) before:

    setInferVersion(true);

    includeSecondaries

    If set to true, all secondary entry points are added too. In the case of @angular/common this is also @angular/common/http, @angular/common/http/testing, @angular/common/testing, @angular/common/http/upgrade, and @angular/common/locales. This exhaustive list shows that using this option for @angular/common is not the best idea because normally, you don't need most of them.

    Since version 14.3, includeSecondaries is true by default.

    However, this option can come in handy for quick experiments or if you want to quickly share a package like @angular/material that comes with a myriad of secondary entry points.

    Even if you share too much, Module Federation will only load the needed ones at runtime. However, please keep in mind that shared packages can not be tree-shaken.

    To skip some secondary entry points, you can assign a configuration option instead of true:

    shared: share({
        "@angular/common": {
            singleton: true,
            strictVersion: true,
            requiredVersion: 'auto',
            includeSecondaries: {
                skip: ['@angular/common/http/testing']
            }
        },
        [...]
    })

    shareAll

    The shareAll helper shares all your dependencies defined in your package.json. The package.json is look up as described above:

    shared: {
      ...shareAll({
          singleton: true,
          strictVersion: true,
          requiredVersion: 'auto'
      }),
      ...sharedMappings.getDescriptors()
    }

    The options passed to shareAll are applied to all dependencies found in your package.json.

    This might come in handy in an mono repo scenario and when doing some experiments/ trouble shooting.

    Eager and Pinned

    Big thanks to Michael Egger-Zikes, who came up with these solutions.

    Module Federation allows to directly bundle shared dependencies into your app's bundles. Hence, you don't need to load an additional bundle per shared dependency. This can be interesting to improve an application's startup performance, when there are lots of shared dependencies.

    One possible usage for improving the startup times is to set eager to true just for the host. The remotes loaded later can reuse these eager dependencies alothough they've been shipped via the host's bundle (e. g. its main.js). This works best, if the host always has the highest compatible versions of the shared dependencies. Also, in this case, you don't need to load the remote entry points upfront.

    While the eager flag is an out of the box feature provided by module federation since its very first days, we need to adjust the webpack configuration used by the Angular CLI a bit to avoid code duplication in the generated bundles. The new withModuleFederationPlugin helper that has been introduced with this plugin's version 14 does this by default. The config just needs to set eager to true.

    module.exports = withModuleFederationPlugin({
      shared: {
        ...shareAll({
          singleton: true,
          eager: true,
          pinned: true,
          strictVersion: true,
          requiredVersion: 'auto',
        }),
      },
    });

    As shown in the last example, we also added another property: pinned. This makes sure, the shared dependency is put into the application's (e. g. the host's) bundle, even though it's not used there. This allows to preload dependencies that are needed later but subsequently loaded micro frontends via one bundle.

    Nx Integration

    If the plugin detects that you are using Nx (it basically looks for a nx.json), it uses the builders provided by Nx.

    Angular Universal (Server Side Rendering)

    Since Version 12.4.0 of this plugin, we support the new jsdom-based Angular Universal API for Server Side Rendering (SSR). Please note that SSR only makes sense in specific scenarios, e. g. for customer-facing apps that need SEO.

    To make use of SSR, you should enable SSR for all of your federation projects (e. g. the shell and the micro frontends).

    Adding Angular Universal BEFORE adding Module Federation

    If you start with a new project, you should add Angular Universal BEFORE adding Module Federation:

    ng add @nguniversal/common --project yourProject
    ng add @angular-architects/module-federation --project yourProject
    

    Then, adjust the port in the generated server.ts:

    const PORT = 5000;

    After this, you can compile and run your application:

    ng build yourProject && ng run yourProject:server
    node dist/yourProject/server/main.js
    

    Adding Angular Universal to an existing Module Federation project

    If you already use @angular-architects/module-federation, you can add Angular Universal this way:

    1. Update @angular-architects/module-federation to the latest version (>= 12.4).

      npm i @angular-architects/module-federation@latest
      
    2. Now, we need to disable asynchronous bootstrapping temporarily. While it's needed for Module Federation, the schematics provided by Angular Universal assume that Angular is bootstrapped in an traditional (synchronous) way. After using these Schematics, we have to enable asynchronous bootstrapping again:

      ng g @angular-architects/module-federation:boot-async false --project yourProject
      
      ng add @nguniversal/common --project yourProject
      
      ng g @angular-architects/module-federation:boot-async true --project yourProject
      
    3. As now we have both, Module Federation and Angular Universal, in place, we can integrate them with each other:

      ng g @angular-architects/module-federation:nguniversal --project yourProject
      
    4. Adjust the used port in the generated server.ts file:

      const PORT = 5000;
    5. Now, you can compile and run your application:

      ng build yourProject && ng run yourProject:server
      node dist/yourProject/server/main.js
      

    Example

    Please find an example here in the branch ssr.

    Trying it out

    To try it out, you can checkout the main branch of our example. After installing the dependencies (npm i), you can repeat the steps for adding Angular Universal to an existing Module Federation project described above twice: Once for the project shell and the port 5000 and one more time for the project mfe1 and port 3000.

    Please find a brain dump for this here.

    Pitfalls when sharing libraries of a Monorepo

    Schematics don't work anymore (e. g. ng add @angular/material or @angular/pwa)

    In order to make module federation work, we need to bootstrap the app asynchronously. Hence, we need to move the bootstrap logic into a new bootstrap.ts and import it via a dynamic import in the main.ts. This is a typical pattern when using Module Federation. The dynamic import makes Module Federation to load the shared libs.

    However, some schematics (e. g. ng add @angular/material or @angular/pwa) assume that bootstrapping directly happens in main.ts. For this reason, there is a schematic, that helps you turning async bootstrapping on and off:

    ng g @angular-architects/module-federation:boot-async false --project yourProject
    
    ng add your-libraries-of-chioce --project yourProject
    
    ng g @angular-architects/module-federation:boot-async true --project yourProject
    

    Warning: No required version specified

    If you get the warning No required version specified and unable to automatically determine one, Module Federation needs some help with finding out the version of a shared library to use. Reasons are not fitting peer dependencies or using secondary entry points like @angular/common/http.

    To avoid this warning you can specify to used version by hand:

    shared: {
        "@angular/common": {
            singleton: true,
            strictVersion: true,
            requireVersion: '12.0.0'
        },
        [...]
    },

    You can also use our share helper that infers the version number from your package.json when setting requireVersion to 'auto':

    shared: share({
        "@angular/common": {
            singleton: true,
            strictVersion: true,
            requireVersion: 'auto'
        },
        [...]
    })

    Not exported Components

    If you use a shared component without exporting it via your library's barrel (index.ts or public-api.ts), you get the following error at runtime:

    core.js:4610 ERROR Error: Uncaught (in promise): TypeError: Cannot read property 'ɵcmp' of undefined
    TypeError: Cannot read property 'ɵcmp' of undefined
        at getComponentDef (core.js:1821)
    

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    Install

    npm i @angular-architects/module-federation

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    59,959

    Version

    15.0.2

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    162 kB

    Total Files

    111

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • mikezks
    • rainerhahnekamp-aa
    • manfred.steyer